Mary Mother of GOD
 Monday   Saints of this Day May 30   Tértio Kaléndas Júnii  
Memorial Day, May 30, 2016

Our Lady of Fatima May 13, October 13, 1917 2015

Ramadan begins Monday, June 5, 2016
and ends Tuesday, July 5, 2016


  Et álibi aliórum plurimórum sanctórum Mártyrum et Confessórum, atque sanctárum Vírginum.
And elsewhere in divers places, many other holy martyrs, confessors, and holy virgins.
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!  (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)



 40 Days for Life  We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
40 days for Life Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world

It is a great poverty that a child must die so that you may live as you wish -- Mother Teresa
 Saving babies, healing moms and dads, 'The Gospel of Life.

CAUSES OF SAINTS April  2016

The saints are a “cloud of witnesses over our head”,
showing us life of Christian perfection is possible.

Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List

Acts of the Apostles

Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

How do I start the Five First Saturdays?

Mary Mother of GOD 15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary
1st v. St. Andronicus 1/70 Disciples received Holy Spirit in Upper Room on day of the Pentecost:  Romans 16:7: "Greet Andronicus and Junia, my kinsmen and my fellow prisoners, who are of note among the apostles, who also were in Christ before me."  preached the Gospel in many cities in the company of Junia, and they guided many to the Christian faith, and performed many miracles, healed the sick, and transformed the temples of idols to churches.
  189 ST ELEUTHERIUS, POPE
383 St Isaac received monastic tonsure pursued ascetic labors in the desert Isaac left the wilderness went to Constantinople to console/encourage the Orthodox, fight heretics prophet miracles helped laypeople and the poor
 628 St. Anastasius XV Bishop convert from the heresy of Arianism, appointed bishop of Pavia in Lombardy, Italy
 714 St. Hubert Benedictine monk at the age of twelve at the abbey of Bretigny, near Noyon, France
1016 St. Walstan Penitent and model of charity and intense personal goodness, spending his life in prayer gave away his goods and worked as a farmhand
1085 St. Gregory VII Hildebrand directed his reformer’s attention, first as counselor to the popes and later (1073-1085) as pope The Gregorian Reform, a milestone in the history of Christ’s Church, was named after this man who tried to extricate the papacy and the whole Church from undue control by civil rulers. Against an unhealthy Church nationalism in some areas, Gregory reasserted the unity of the whole Church based on Christ and expressed in the bishop of Rome, the successor of St. Peter.
1431 St. Joan of Arc the patroness of soldiers and of France voices "of St. Michael, St. Catherine, and St. Margaret" told Joan to go to the King of France and help him reconquer his kingdom
1582 Bl. William Filby Martyr of England studied at Oxford converted to Catholicism  ordination as a priest in 1581 Reims, France arrested with St. Edmund Campion executed at Tyburn
1612 Bl. Richard Newport English martyr studied in Rome and was ordained in 1597 arrested banished twice returned each time martyred after third arrest
1933 Apolo Kivebulaya 1972 wurde der erste Bischof nach Boga entsandt und heute gibt es eine große anglikanische Kirche in Zaire.

May 30 – Our Lady of Europe (Gibraltar) – 4th Apparition of Tre Fontane (Italy)
- Saint Joan of Arc (d. 1431)   
Every Saturday, Joan of Arc used to bring flowers to the Madonna
Because she had a special devotion to the Virgin Mary, Joan went to the Bermont Hermitage every Saturday, since she did not have to work that day. She would bring candles or bouquets of flowers to the 14th-century Madonna that is still visible today.
(…) Joan had a particular devotion to the Virgin in the mystery of the Annunciation, whose feast was on the first day of the year in Lorraine, France. When she was at the head of the army, she kept her dear banner dedicated to Christ the King at her side, which was a pennant representing the Annunciation that she “loved 40 times more than her sword.”
In this, she was unknowingly imitating the official cult of the diocese of the Duchy of Lorraine whose national flag was the great standard of Lorraine called “The Nunciade” because it depicted the scene of the Annunciation on the white muslin.

www.amis-jeanne-darc.org


May 30 – 4th apparition at Tre Fontane (Rome, Italy, 1947), approved 
 
Two white hands “removed something from his eyes”
 Bruno Cornacchiola was born on May 9, 1913 in a poor agnostic family of five children. He became a Christian in an Adventist church, which was hostile to the pope.
As a radical Protestant, he intended to kill Pope Pius XII, until the Virgin Mary appeared to him at Tre Fontane (Rome) on April 12, 1947. Tre Fontane is where Saint Paul (whose name was Saul before his conversion) was beheaded.
On April 12, 1947, Bruno had taken his three children to play ball on a field near Tre Fontane; the ball was lost, a search began. Then one of the children, Gianfranco, suddenly knelt at the entrance of a grotto, saying: "The beautiful lady!" The other children came and knelt too, repeating: "The beautiful lady!" Their father tried to pull them away but they had become extremely heavy and he could not move them.

Entering the grotto, Bruno Cornacchiola had the sensation that two white hands "removed something from his eyes," and after a moment of darkness, he saw her too ... The beautiful Lady said: "You are persecuting me, stop now! Return to the holy fold. Ask the people to pray, and to recite the Rosary daily for the conversion of sinners,
the unbelievers, and for the unity of Christians."  Françoise Breynaert


May 30 - Our Lady of Europe (Gibraltar)
Now Mary Said (I)
Now Mary said: "You see before you the Lord's servant, let it happen to me as you have said." The inner calm of Mary, mother of Jesus Christ, proceeds from her unconditional surrender to God. Her whole being concentrates on Him as Creator and Redeemer, just as she exults in the Magnificat: "My soul proclaims the greatness of the Lord and my spirit rejoices in God my Savior; because He has looked upon the humiliation of his servant."

That is Mary all over: in her awareness of her littleness expecting all from God with a boundless confidence.
A deep, imperturbable silence flows through her, because she has given full space to God to solemnize the immense miracle of the incarnation of His Son in her virginal womb. I use the word 'solemnize' rather than 'execute' for its deeper meaning, because the word is used for espousals. In fact Mary is the bride of the Holy Spirit. She wondered, however, how this would come about, to which the angel answered: "The Holy Spirit will come upon you, and the power of the Most High will cover you with its shadow. And so the child will be holy and will be called Son of God. And I tell you this too: your cousin Elizabeth also, in her old age, has conceived a son, and she whom people called barren is now in her sixth month, for nothing is impossible to God." The same Elizabeth calls her blessed, because: "(...) blessed is she who believed that the promise made her by the Lord w ould be fulfilled."
By Nicolaas Maria Peeters (artist, 2002).

Mary's Divine Motherhood
Called in the Gospel "the Mother of Jesus," Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as "the Mother of my Lord" (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly "Mother of God" (Theotokos).

Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.

1st v. St. Andronicus 1/70 Disciples received Holy Spirit in Upper Room on day of the Pentecost:  Romans 16:7: "Greet Andronicus and Junia, my kinsmen and my fellow prisoners, who are of note among the apostles, who also were in Christ before me."  preached the Gospel in many cities in the company of Junia, and they guided many to the Christian faith, and performed many miracles, healed the sick, and transformed the temples of idols to churches.
IV v.  Natalia and Salonus  beheaded by the sword for confessing faith in Christ
   Saint Euplos died a martyr's death sewn up in an ox skin beneathe the harsh rays of the sun.
       Isaiah and Nikanor of Arkhangel'sk Monks glorified in the exploit of wilderness-dwelling on the banks of the River Rucha in the Arkhangel'sk frontier region.
  189 ST ELEUTHERIUS, POPE
XV v.  Monk Yakov (James) of Galich pursued asceticism in the
 274 St. Felix I Pope from 269-274
            Gabíni et Críspuli Túrribus, in Sardínia, sanctórum Mártyrum  where they had preached the Gospel
            Syci et Palatíni Antiochíæ sanctórum endured many torments for the name of Christ
 383 St Isaac received monastic tonsure pursued ascetic labors in the desert Isaac left the wilderness went to Constantinople to console/encourage the Orthodox, fight heretics prophet miracles helped laypeople and the poor
  370 St Basilíi et Emméliæ uxóris  Cæsaréæ in Cappadócia parents of St. Basil the Great, St. Gregory of Nyssa, St. Peter of Sebastopol, bishops, and St. Macrina, virgin lived in exile in the deserts of Pontus after the persecution they died in peace, leaving their children as heirs of their virtues.
 400 St. Venantius Hermit brother of St. Honoratus Both lived on an island near Cannes, France, until they departed to embrace the monastic life in the Eastern Empire.Venantius died at Medon, in Morea (modern Greece).
 410 St Isaac of Constantinople bravely defended the Catholic faith against Arian Emperor Valens whom he publicly denounced Abbot
  418  Exsuperántii, Epíscopi et Confessóris Ravénnæ sancti
 628 St. Anastasius XV Bishop convert from the heresy of Arianism, appointed bishop of Pavia in Lombardy, Italy
 655 St. Madelgisilus (Mauguille) disciple of St Fursey hermit disciple of St Fursey hermit with St Pulgan
 714 St. Hubert Benedictine monk at the age of twelve at the abbey of Bretigny, near Noyon, France
1016 St. Walstan Penitent and model of charity and intense personal goodness, spending his life in prayer gave away his goods and worked as a farmhand
1085 St. Gregory VII Hildebrand directed his reformer’s attention, first as counselor to the popes and later (1073-1085) as pope The Gregorian Reform, a milestone in the history of Christ’s Church, was named after this man who tried to extricate the papacy and the whole Church from undue control by civil rulers. Against an unhealthy Church nationalism in some areas, Gregory reasserted the unity of the whole Church based on Christ and expressed in the bishop of Rome, the successor of St. Peter.
1252 St. Ferdinand III of Castile extremely devoted to the Blessed Virgin Patron of engineers conquered the city of Cordoba from the Moors founded the Cathedral of Burgos University of Salamanca a great administrator and a man of deep faith. He founded hospitals and bishoprics, monasteries, chuches, and cathedrals during his reign. He also compiled and reformed a code of laws which were used until the modern era. Ferdinand rebuilt the Cathedral of Burgos and changed the mosque in Seville into a Cathedral. He was a just ruler, frequently pardoning former offenders to his throne. buried in the habit of his secular Franciscan Order
1401 Blessed Andrew Franchi bishop of Pistoia, an office he filled with distinction and holiness for 23 years good religious and an able administrator served as prior in three convents while still quite young, OP B (AC)
1431 St. Joan of Arc the patroness of soldiers and of France voices "of St. Michael, St. Catherine, and St. Margaret" told Joan to go to the King of France and help him reconquer his kingdom
1483 Blessed James Bertoni At nine James joined Servites serving as procurator of the friary from the time of his ordination till death, Miracles wrought at his tomb in the church of St John at Faenza led to a popular cultus, formally approved in 1766OSM (AC)
1582 Bl. William Filby Martyr of England studied at Oxford converted to Catholicism  ordination as a priest in 1581 Reims, France arrested with St. Edmund Campion executed at Tyburn
1582 Bl. Thomas Cottam English martyr raised as a Protestant and studied at Oxford University convert to Catholicism ordination at Douai and Rome Jesuit
1582 Bl. Lawrence Richardson Martyr of England educated at Oxford. Converting to the faith, ordained in 1577 at Douai  worked in Lancashire until martyrdom at Tyburn
1582 St. Luke Kirby 1/40 martyrs of England and Wales Educated at Cambridge converted and studied in Rome and in Douai martyred at Tyburn
1612 Bl. Richard Newport English martyr studied in Rome and was ordained in 1597 arrested banished twice returned each time martyred after third arrest
1612 Bl. Maurus Scott Benedictine martyr of England studied law at Cambridge where he became Catholic converted by Blessed John Roberts ordained in Sahagun Spain St. Facundus Benedictine Abbey banished returned again and again exiled each time finally martyred
1933 Apolo Kivebulaya 1972 wurde der erste Bischof nach Boga entsandt und heute gibt es eine große anglikanische Kirche in Zaire.
Solemnity of Pentecost, the Pope recalls the fact that this year marks the 51st anniversary of Servant of God Pius XII's Encyclical "Fidei donum,"
which "promoted and encouraged cooperation between Churches for the mission 'ad gentes'."
Mary the Mother of God


1st v. St. Andronicus 1/70 Disciples received Holy Spirit in Upper Room on day of the Pentecost:  Romans 16:7: "Greet Andronicus and Junia, my kinsmen and my fellow prisoners, who are of note among the apostles, who also were in Christ before me."  preached the Gospel in many cities in the company of Junia, and they guided many to the Christian faith, and performed many miracles, healed the sick, and transformed the temples of idols to churches.
On this day, St. Andronicus departed. This disciple was chosen by the Lord to be among the seventy disciples whom He sent before Him to preach the kingdom of God. He received the Holy Spirit in the Upper Room on the day of the Pentecost. St. Paul mentioned his name in (Romans 16:7) saying: "Greet Andronicus and Junia, my kinsmen and my fellow prisoners, who are of note among the apostles, who also were in Christ before me."

He preached the Gospel in many cities in the company of Junia, and they guided many to the Christian faith, and performed many miracles, healed the sick, and transformed the temples of idols to churches. When they completed their course, and the Lord willed to take them from this world, Andronicus became ill for a short time and departed in peace. Junia buried him in a cave, and he prayed to the Lord to take him also. He departed on the next day.

IV v. Natalia and Salonus The Holy Martyrs beheaded by the sword for confessing faith in Christ, not later than the IV Century.
Saint Euplos died a martyr's death sewn up in an ox skin beneathe the harsh rays of the sun.
Monk Yakov (James) of Galich pursued asceticism in the XV Century and was buried in the Galich Starotorzhsk monastery, beneathe the altar of the church in honour of the holy Passion-Bearers Boris and Gleb. The holy saint of God was glorified by miracles after his death.
Monks Isaiah and Nikanor of Arkhangel'sk glorified in the exploit of wilderness-dwelling on the banks of the River Rucha in the Arkhangel'sk frontier region.

189 ST ELEUTHERIUS, POPE

As in the case of all the other early Roman pontiffs, we have very little reliable information concerning Pope Eleutherius. It is stated that he was a Greek by origin. In his time Montanism was causing uneasiness in both West and East, and St Irenaeus came to Rome with a letter about it from the Christians of Lyons but it is not clear what action the pope took.

Eleutherius is now chiefly remembered from his supposed correspondence with the British king, Lucius, who was believed to have written to ask his warranty to be admitted into the Christian fold, thus bringing about the first preaching of Christianity in Britain (see St Lucius, December 3). This legend is no longer credited, but on the strength of it a feast of St Eleutherius is observed in the dioceses of Westminster and Portsmouth on May 30.

See the Liber Pontificalis, ed. Duchesne, vol. i, pp. cii—civ, 58 and 136 and J. P. Kirsch in the Catholic Encyclopedia, vol. v, pp. 378—379.
383 St Isaac received monastic tonsure pursued ascetic labors in the desert Isaac left the wilderness went to Constantinople to console and encourage the Orthodox, fight heretics prophet miracles helped laypeople and the poor
Isaak vom Dalmatus-Kloster
Orthodoxe Kirche: 30. Mai (auch 22. März und 3. August) Katholische Kirche: 27. März (auch 30. Mai und 3. August)

During the reign of the emperor Valens (364-378), a zealous adherent of the Arian heresy, there was a persecution of the Orthodox, and churches were closed and destroyed.
Hearing of the persecution, St Isaac left the wilderness and went to Constantinople to console and encourage the Orthodox, and to fight against the heretics.
At that time, barbarian Goths along the River Danube were making war against the Empire. They seized Thrace and advanced toward Constantinople.

When emperor Valens was leaving the capital with his soldiers, St Isaac cried out, "Emperor, unlock the churches of the Orthodox, and then the Lord will aid you!"

But the emperor, disdaining the words of the monk, confidently continued on his way. The saint repeated his request and prophecy three times. The angry emperor ordered St Isaac to be thrown into a deep ravine, filled with thorns and mud, from which it was impossible to escape.
St Isaac remained alive by God's help, and he emerged, overtook the emperor and said, "You wanted to destroy me, but three angels pulled me from the mire. Hear me, open up the churches for the Orthodox and you shall defeat the enemy. If, however, you do not heed me, then you shall not return. You will be captured and burned alive." The emperor was astonished at the saint's boldness and ordered his attendants Saturninus and Victor to take the monk and hold him in prison until his return.

St Isaac's prophecy was soon fulfilled. The Goths defeated and pursued the Greek army. The emperor and his Arian generals took refuge in a barn filled with straw, and the attackers set it afire. After receiving news of the emperor's death, they released St Isaac and honored him as a prophet.

Then the holy Emperor Theodosius the Great (379-395) came to the throne. On the advice of Saturninus and Victor, he summoned the Elder, treating him with great respect. Obeying his instructions, he banished the Arians from Constantinople and restored the churches to the Orthodox. St Isaac wanted to return to his desert, but Saturninus and Victor begged him not to leave the city, but to remain and protect it by his prayers.  Saturninus built a monastery for the saint in Constantinople, where monks gathered around him. St Isaac was the monastery's igumen and spiritual guide. He also nourished laypeople, and helped many of the poor and suffering. When he had reached an advanced age, St Isaac made St Dalmatus (August 3) igumen. The monastery was later named for Dalmatus.
St Isaac died in the year 383, and his memory is also celebrated on March 22.
Isaak vom Dalmatus-Kloster
Orthodoxe Kirche: 30. Mai (auch 22. März und 3. August) Katholische Kirche: 27. März (auch 30. Mai und 3. August)

Isaak stammte aus Syrien und lebte im 4. Jahrhundert als Einsiedler. Unter Kaiser Valentius (364-378), der den Arianern anhing, wurden die Athanasianer verfolgt und ihre Kirchen geschlossen oder zerstört. Als Isaak von der Verfolgung erfuhr, verließ er seine Einsiedelei und ging nach Konstantinopel, um hier die Gemeinden zu unterstützen. Als die Goten Thrakien eroberten und auf Konstantinopel vorrückten, beschwor Isaak dreimal den Kaiser, die Kirchen der Athanasianer wieder zu öffnen, sonst würde er keine Hilfe von Gott erhalten. Der Kaiser ließ Isaak daraufhin in einen Sumpf werfen, aber Isaak kam unversehrt wieder aus dem Sumpf hervor und prophezeite dem Kaiser, er werde im Feuer umkommen, wenn er nicht die Kirchen öffne. Valentius übergab Isaak den Gefängnisaufsehern Saturninus und Viktor und zog gegen die Goten. Er wurde mit seinen Generälen von den Goten in einer Scheune, in die er sich geflüchtet hatte, verbrannt. Isaak wurde daraufhin freigelassen und als Prophet verehrt. Der neue Kaiser Theodosius (379-395) öffnete die Kirchen der Athanasianer und verbannte die Arianer aus Konstantinopel. Isaak ließ sich auf Wunsch von Saturninus und Viktor nahe Konstantinopel nieder. Aus seiner Einsiedelei entstand ein Kloster, in dem er 383 starb. Das Kloster wurde später nach seinem Gefährten und Nachfolger Dalmatus benannt. Das Gedächtnis Isaaks wird auch am 22. März und am 3. August (mit Dalmatus und Faustus) begangen.

370 Basilíi et Emméliæ uxóris ,Cæsaréæ, in Cappadócia, sanctórum Basilíi et Emméliæ uxóris , qui fuérunt paréntes beatórum Basilíi Magni et Gregórii Nysséni ac Petri Sebasténsis Episcopórum, atque Macrínæ Vírginis.  Hi vero sancti cónjuges, témpore Galérii Maximiáni, extórres facti, Pónticas solitúdines incolúere; et post persecutiónem, fíliis suárum relíctis virtútum herédibus, in pace quievérunt.
    At Caesarea in Cappadocia, the Saints Basil and his wife Emmelia, parents of St. Basil the Great, St. Gregory of Nyssa, St. Peter of Sebastopol, bishops, and St. Macrina, virgin.  They lived in exile in the deserts of Pontus during the reign of Galerius Maximian, and after the persecution they died in peace, leaving their children as heirs of their virtues.

Basil and Emmelia (RM)
Died c. 370. Saint Basil and Saint Emmelia were the parents of Saints Basil, Gregory of Nyssa, Peter of Sebaste, and Macrina the Younger. They were exiled for their Christianity during the persecution of Galerius Maximinus but were later allowed to return to Caesarea, Cappadocia, where they lived the rest of their lives. Saint Basil was educated at home by his mother (Benedictines, Delaney).

418 Exsuperántii, Epíscopi et Confessóris Ravénnæ sancti
    At Ravenna, St. Exuperantius, bishop and confessor.
Exuperantius of Ravenna B (RM)
Died 418. Bishop of Ravenna, Italy, 398 to 418 (Benedictines).
418 ST EXSUPERANTIUS, BISHOP OF RAVENNA

THE successor of St Ursus as metropolitan of Ravenna was St Exsuperantius, or Superantius—a holy man who did much to promote the temporal as well as the spiritual welfare of his flock. He lived during the reign of the Emperor Honorius, and when Stilicho invested Ravenna with his army, St Exsuperantius prevailed upon him to restrain his soldiers from desecrating and looting the cathedral. The bishop built the town of Argenta—so-called because it paid a tribute in silver to the church of Ravenna. After a peaceful and uneventful episcopate of twenty years St Exsuperantius died in 418 and was buried in the church of St Agnes. His relics now rest in the cathedral of Ravenna.

There is a short account in the Acta Sanctorum, May, vol. vii, but the ultimate authority seems to be the not very trustworthy Liber pontificalis seu vitae pontificum Ravennatum of Andreas Agnellus. This may conveniently be consulted in Migne, PL., vol. 106 cc. 525-528 but a better text is provided by Holder-Egger in MGH., Scriptores Rerum Langobardicarum, pp. 265 seq.

Antiochíæ sanctórum Syci et Palatíni, qui, pro Christi nómine, multa torménta passi sunt.
    At Antioch, Saints Sycus and Palatinus, who endured many torments for the name of Christ.

Túrribus, in Sardínia, sanctórum Mártyrum Gabíni et Críspuli.
    At Torres in Sardinia, the holy martyrs Gabinus and Crispulus.

274 St. Felix I Pope from 269-274
Sancti Felícis Primi, Papæ et Mártyris, cujus dies natális tértio Kaléndas Januárii recensétur.
    Pope St. Felix I, martyr, whose birthday is commemorated on the 30th of December.

St. Felix inherited from Dionysius the problems associated with the deposition of Bishop Paul of Samosata. Although he had been deposed legitimately, he refused to allow Domnus to succeed him. Emperor Aurelian helped to insure that Domnus was allowed to rule the see.

Date of birth unknown; d. 274. Early in 269 he succeeded Saint Dionysius as head of the Roman Church. About this time there arrived at Rome, directed to Pope Dionysius, the report of the Synod of Antioch which in that very year had deposed the local bishop, Paul of Samosata, for his heretical teachings concerning the doctrine of the Trinity (see Antioch).
A letter, probably sent by Felix to the East in response to the synodal report, containing an exposition of the doctrine of the Trinity, was at a later date interpolated in the interest of his sect by a follower of Apollinaris (see Apollinarianism). This spurious document was submitted to the Council of Ephesus in 431 (Mansi, "Coll. conc.", IV, 1188; cf. Harnack, "Geschichte der altchristlichen Literatur", I, 659 sqq.; Bardenhewer, "Geschichte der altchristlichen Literatur", II, 582 sq.).
The fragment preserved in the Acts of the council lays special emphasis on the unity and identity of the Son of God and the Son of Man in Christ.
The same fragment gives Pope Felix as a martyr; but this detail, which occurs again in the biography of the pope in the "Liber Pontificalis" (Ed. Duchesne, I, 58), is unsupported by any authentic earlier evidence and is manifestly due to a confusion of names. According to the notice in the "Liber Pontificalis", Felix erected a basilica on the Via Aurelia; the same source also adds that he was buried there ("Hic fecit basilicam in Via Aurelia, ubi et sepultus est"). The latter detail is evidently an error, for the fourth century Roman calendar of feasts says that Pope Felix was interred in the Catacomb of St. Callistus on the Via Appia ("III Kal. Januarii, Felicis in Callisti", it reads in the "Depositio episcoporum").

The statement of the "Liber Pontificalis" concerning the pope's martyrdom results obviously from a confusion with a Roman martyr of the same name buried on the Via Aurelia, and over whose grave a church was built. In the Roman "Feriale" or calendar of feasts, referred to above, the name of Felix occurs in the list of Roman bishops (Depositio episcoporum), and not in that of the martyrs.

The notice in the "Liber Pontificalis" ascribes to this pope a decree that Masses should be celebrated on the tombs of martyrs ("Hic constituit supra memorias martyrum missas celebrare"). The author of this entry was evidently alluding to the custom of celebrating the Holy Sacrifice privately, at the altars near or over the tombs of the martyrs in the crypts of the catacombs (missa ad corpus), while the solemn celebration of the Sacred Mysteries always took place in the basilicas built over the catacombs. This practice, still in force at the end of the fourth century (Prudentius, "Peristephanon", XI, vv. 171 sqq.), dates apparently from the period when the great cemeterial basilicas were built in Rome, and owes its origin to the solemn commemoration services of martyrs, held at their tombs on the anniversary of their burial, as early as the third century.

Felix probably issued no such decree, but the compiler of the "Liber Pontificalis" attributed it to him because he made no departure from the custom in force in his time. According to the above-mentioned detail of the "Depositio episcoporum", Felix was interred in the catacomb of St. Callistus, 30 December. In the present Roman Martyrology his name occurs 30 May, the date given in the "Liber Pontificalis" as that of his death (III Kal. Jun.); it is probably an error which could easily occur through a transcriber writing Jun. for Jan.

274 ST FELIX I, POPE 

ACCORDING to the Roman Martyrology and the Liber Pontificalis, Felix I (a Roman by birth) ended his life as a martyr. This is almost certainly a mistake due to confusion with a certain Felix, a martyr who was buried on the Via Aurelia. The same confusion has led to the undoubtedly incorrect state­ment in the Liber Pontificalis (second edition) that Pope Felix “built a church on the Via Aurelia where he was also buried “. Very little is known of Felix, though he seems to have sent some reply to the report of the Synod of Antioch—announcing the deposition of Paul of Samosata—which had been brought to Rome in the time of his predecessor, Pope St Dionysius. On the other hand the quotation from what purported to be Felix’s letter which was read at the Council of Ephesus is declared by such scholars as Duchesne, Bardenhewer, Harnack and others to have been an Apollinarian forgery. The statement that Pope Felix “decreed that Masses should be celebrated on the tombs of the martyrs” may possibly refer to some practice initiated by him of placing an obstruction to block the hollow space (arcosolia) left above the tombs in the catacombs, exception only being made for tombs which were known to be those of martyrs. Thus the decree would mean that the Mysteries should be celebrated (only) on the tombs of martyrs. The true date of his death was December 30 (111 kal. Jan.), but a misreading of Jun. for Jan. has led to its being assigned to May 30. The Depositio Episcoporum which reveals this error also informs us that Felix was buried in the cemetery of Callistus.

See J. P. Kirsch in the Catholic Encyclopedia, vol. vi, pp. 29—30; Duchesne in Liber Pontificalis, vol. i, p. 158; CMH., pp. 14—16 ; Bardenhewer, Geschichte der altkirchilchen Literatur, vol. ii, pp. 645—647.

1933 Apolo Kivebulaya 1972 wurde der erste Bischof nach Boga entsandt und heute gibt es eine große anglikanische Kirche in Zaire.
Anglikanische Kirche: 30. Mai

10 Jahre nach dem Tod der Märtyrer von Uganda bat das Stammesoberhaupt von Boga, einem Ort in Westuganda, erneut um Missionare, die aber nach kurzer Zeit wieder fortgesandt wurden, da sie zu energisch gegen Zauberei, Vielehe und Alkoholismus vorgingen. 1896 wurde ein junger Soldat, Apolo Kivebulaya, nach Boga gesandt, der sich kurz zuvor bekehrt hatte und als Katechet ausgebildet war. Auch er konnte sich in dem Dorf kaum behaupten und wurde schließlich des Mordes an der Schwester des Stammeshäuptlings angeklagt. Er verbrachte eine Zeit im Gefängnis der britischen Verwaltung, wurde dann aber freigelassen und kehrte nach Boga zurück. Hier predigte er weiter das Evangelium und konnte mehrere Menschen bekehren. 1915 wurde Boga Belgisch-Kongo zugeschlagen und die kleine Gemeinde war nunmehr von Uganda isoliert. Aber Apolo bildete viele der Bekehrten aus, so daß die Gemeinde sich selbst erhalten konnte. Als er am 30.5.1933 starb, bestand eine blühende Gemeinde in Boga, die außerhalb des kleinen Gebietes kaum bekannt war. 1969 fand ein amerikanischer Offizier eine Gemeinde von 25.000 Mitgliedern vor und drängte die anglikanische Kirche, diese Gemeinde zu unterstützen.
1972 wurde der erste Bischof nach Boga entsandt und heute gibt es eine große anglikanische Kirche in Zaire.
1612 Bl. Richard Newport English martyr studied in Rome and was ordained in 1597 arrested banished twice returned each time martyred after third arrest
Also called Richard Smith. Born at Harringworth, Nothamptonshire, England, he studied in Rome and was ordained in 1597. Returning to England, he worked in London for a number of years before being arrested and banished twice, but he returned each time. His third arrest was with Blessed William Scott. Both were hanged, drawn, and quartered at Tybum for being Catholic priests.
1612 Bl. Maurus Scott Benedictine martyr of England studied law at Cambridge where he became Catholic converted by Blessed John Roberts ordained in Sahagun Spain St. Facundus Benedictine Abbey banished returned again and again exiled each time Finally martyred.
1612 BB. WILLIAM SCOTT AND RICHARD NEWPORT, MARTYRS
WILLIAM Scott, of Chigwell, was studying law at Trinity Hall, Cambridge, when he was converted by reading Catholic literature. He went abroad, and took the Benedictine habit in the abbey of St Facundus, assuming in religion the name of Maurus. After his ordination he was sent on the English mission. As he entered London he saw Bd John Roberts, the monk who had received him into the Church, being hurried to execution, and three days later he was himself arrested and cast into prison where he remained a year. He was then deported, but soon made his way back to England. According to a contemporary he was imprisoned and exiled more than once and on each occasion he returned. After his final arrest, as he was being conveyed by boat from Gravesend to London he threw into the river a bag containing his breviary, his faculties and some medals and crosses. The bag was caught in a fisherman’s net and figured at the trial. In prison he had as his companion a secular priest called Richard Newport, a Northamptonshire man by birth, who after having been trained in Rome, had laboured very successfully in England. He also had been several times imprisoned and twice banished. The two prisoners were brought up at the Old Bailey before the Lord Mayor, the Bishop of London, the Lord Chief Justice, and other magistrates. They made a bold defence, but their condemnation was a foregone conclusion and they were sentenced to death as traitors. They suffered at Tyburn with great fortitude on May 30, 1612.

See Challoner, MMP., pp. 323—329, and B. Camm, Nine Martyr Monks (1931), pp. 180-237.

Born William Scott in Chigwell, Essex, England, he studied law at Cambridge, where he became a Catholic. Maurus was converted by Blessed John Roberts, the Benedictine, and was sent to Sahagun, in Spain, to St. Facundus Benedictine Abbey He was ordained there, taking the name Maurus. When he returned to England he was arrested, imprisoned for a year, and then banished. He returned again and again, being exiled each time. Finally, he was hanged, drawn, and quartered at Tyburn on May 30 with Blessed Richard Newport.
1582 Bl. William Filby Martyr of England studied at Oxford converted to Catholicism  ordination as a priest in 1581 Reims, France arrested with St. Edmund Campion executed at Tyburn
Born in Oxfordshire, he studied at Oxford. After graduation, William was converted to Catholicism and went to Reims, France, where he received ordination as a priest in 1581. He returned to England immediately and was arrested with St. Edmund Campion. William was executed at Tyburn with three companions on May 30. He was beatified in 1886.
1582 Bl. Thomas Cottam English martyr raised as a Protestant and studied at Oxford University convert to Catholicism ordination at Douai and Rome Jesuit
Born at Dilworth, Lancashire, England, in 1549, he was raised as a Protestant and studied at Oxford University before undergoing a conversion to Catholicism. Leaving England to prepare for ordination at Douai and Rome, he was ordained and joined the Jesuits going home in 1580. Arrested at his landing at Dover, he was taken to the Tower of London and eventually hanged, drawn, and quartered with three companions.
1582 Bl. Lawrence Richardson Martyr of England educated at Oxford. Converting to the faith, Lawrence went to Douai ordained in 1577 worked at Lancashire until his martyrdom at Tyburn
He was born in Great Crosby, Lancashire, England, and was educated at Oxford. Converting to the faith, Lawrence went to Douai, France, and was ordained in 1577. He returned to Lancashire and worked there until his martyrdom at Tyburn. He was beatified in 1886.
1582 St. Luke Kirby 1/40 martyrs of England and Wales Educated at Cambridge converted and studied in Rome and in Douai martyred at Tyburn
Educated at Cambridge, England, he converted and studied in Rome and in Douai, France. In 1580, he returned to England, only to be arrested two years later. Luke was imprisoned in the Tower of London and subjected to the infamous device “Scavenger’s Daughter.” a hideous form of torture. He was then martyred at Tyburn.
1483 Blessed James Bertoni At nine James joined Servites serving as procurator of the friary from the time of his ordination till death, Miracles wrought at his tomb in the church of St John at Faenza led to a popular cultus, formally approved in 1766 OSM (AC)
Born in Faenza, Italy, c. 1444; cultus confirmed 1766. At the age of nine, James joined the Servites, whom he served as procurator of the friary from the time of his ordination till his death (Benedictines).
1483 BD JAMES BERTONI tall, thin and very pallid: Miracles wrought at his tomb in the church of St John at Faenza led to a popular cultus, which was formally approved in 1766
AT the age of nine, Bd James Philip Bertoni was placed in the Servite priory of Faenza in fulfilment of a vow which his father had made during a dangerous illness, and in later years as a professed Servite he proved himself a most holy religious. So great was his horror of sin that he made his confession every day. In appearance he was tall, thin and very pallid. After his ordination he became procurator of the priory of Faenza and held other responsible offices. He died on May 25, 1483, at the age of thirty-nine. Miracles wrought at his tomb in the church of St John at Faenza led to a popular cultus, which was formally approved in 1766. Soon after his death, in recognition of his son’s sanctity, his father was declared a burgher of Faenza and was granted exemption from all taxes.

A short Latin life written by Nicholas Borghesi was printed in the Acta Sanctorum, May, vol. vi, as also in the Monumenta Ordinis Servorum B.V.M., vol. iv (1901), pp. 63—67. There is also a modem sketch by L. Trebbi (I867).
1431 St. Joan of Arc the patroness of soldiers and of France voices "of St. Michael, St. Catherine, and St. Margaret" told Joan to go to the King of France and help him reconquer his kingdom
Rotómagi sanctæ Joánnæ Arcénsis Vírginis, Puéllæ Aurelianénsis appellátæ, quæ cum fórtiter pro pátria dimicásset, tandem, in hóstium potestátem trádita, iníquo judício condemnáta est et igne combústa; atque a Benedícto Décimo quinto, Pontífice Máximo, Sanctórum fastis adscrípta.
    At Rouen, St. Joan of Arc, virgin, called the Maid of Orleans.  After fighting heroically for her fatherland, she was at the end delivered into the hands of the enemies, condemned by an unjust judge, and burned at the stake.  The supreme Pontiff Benedict XV placed her name on the canon of the saints.

1431 ST JOAN OF ARC, VIRGIN
ST JEANNE LA PUCELLE, or Joan of Arc as she has always been called in England, was born on the feast of the Epiphany 1412, at Domrémy, a little village of Champagne on the bank of the Meuse. Her father, Jacques d’Arc, was a peasant farmer of some local standing, a worthy man, frugal and rather morose; but his wife was a gentle affectionate mother to their five children. From her the two girls of the family received a good training in household duties. “In sewing and spinning I fear no woman”, Joan afterwards declared; reading and writing, however, she never learnt. Impressive and often touching testimony to her piety and exemplary conduct appears in the sworn depositions of her former neighbours presented in the process for her rehabilitation. Priests and former playmates amongst others recalled her love of prayer and church, her frequent reception of the sacraments, her care of the sick, and her sympathy with poor wayfarers to whom she often gave up her own bed. “She was so good”, it was stated, “that all the village loved her.” A happy childhood hers seems to have been, though clouded by the disasters of her country as well as by the dangers of attack to which a frontier town like Domrémy, bordering on Lorraine, was specially exposed. On one occasion at least before she began her great undertaking Joan had been obliged to flee with her parents to the town of Neufchatel, at eight miles distance, to escape a raid of Burgundian freebooters who sacked Domrémy.

She had been but a very young child when Henry V of England invaded France, overran Normandy and claimed the crown of the insane king, Charles VI. France, in the throes of civil war between the contending parties of the Dukes of Burgundy and Orleans, had been in no condition from the first to put up an adequate resistance, and after the Duke of Burgundy had been treacherously murdered by the Dauphin’s servants the Burgundians threw in their lot with the English, who supported their claims. The death of the rival kings in 1422 brought no relief to France. The Duke of Bedford, as regent for the infant King of England, prosecuted the war with vigour, one fortified town after another falling into the hands of the allies, while Charles VII, or the Dauphin as he was still called, seems to have regarded the position as hopeless and spent his time in frivolous pastimes with his court.
St Joan was in her fourteenth year when she experienced the earliest of those supernatural manifestations which were to lead her through the path of patriotism to death at the stake. At first it was a single voice addressing her apparently from near by, and accompanied by a blaze of light: afterwards, as the voices increased in number, she was able to see her interlocutors whom she identified as St Michael, St Catherine, St Margaret and others. Only very gradually did they unfold her mission: it was a mission which might well appal her: she, a simple peasant girl, was to save France!  She never spoke about these Voices in Domrémy she was too much afraid of her stern father. By May 1428 they had become insistent and explicit. She must present herself at once to Robert Baudricourt, who commanded the king’s forces in the neighbouring town of Vaucouleurs. Joan succeeded in persuading an uncle who lived near Vaucouleurs to take her to him, but Baudricourt only laughed and dismissed her, saying that her father ought to give her a good hiding.
At this time the military position was well-nigh desperate, for Orleans, the last remaining stronghold, had been invested by the English and was in danger of falling. After Joan’s return to Domrémy her Voices gave her no rest. When she protested that she was a poor girl who could neither ride nor fight, they replied; “It is God who commands it”. Unable to resist such a call she secretly left home and went back to Vaucouleurs. Baudricourt’s scepticism as to her mission was somewhat shaken when official confirmation reached him of a serious defeat of the French which Joan had previously announced to him. He now not only consented to send her to the king but gave her an escort of three men-at-arms. At her own request she travelled in male dress to protect herself. Although the little party reached Chinon, where the king was residing, on March 6, 1429, it was not till two days later that Joan was admitted to his presence. Charles had purposely disguised himself, but she identified him at once and, by a secret sign communicated to her by her Voices and imparted by her to him alone, she obliged him to believe in the supernatural nature of her mission. She then asked him for soldiers whom she might lead to the relief of Orleans. This request was opposed by La Trémouille, the king’s favourite, and by a large section of the court, who regarded the girl as a crazy visionary or a scheming impostor. To settle the matter it was decided to send her to be examined by a learned body of theologians at Poitiers.
After a searching interrogatory extending over three weeks this council decided that they found nothing to disapprove of, and advised Charles to make prudent use of her services. Accordingly after her return to Chinon arrangements were pushed forward to equip her to lead an expeditionary force. A special standard was made for her bearing the words “Jesus: Maria”, together with a representation of the Eternal Father to whom two kneeling angels were presenting a fleur-delis. On April 27 the army left Blois with Joan at its head clad in white armour, and in spite of some contretemps she entered Orleans on April 29. Her presence in the beleaguered city wrought marvels. By May 8, the English forts which surrounded Orleans had been captured and the siege raised, after she herself had been wounded in the breast by an arrow. All these events with their approximate dates she had prophesied before starting the campaign. She would fain have followed up these successes, for her Voices had told her that she would not last for long; but La Trémouille and the archbishop of Rheims were in favour of negotiating with the enemy. They persisted in regarding the relief of Orleans merely as a piece of good luck. However, the Maid was allowed to undertake a short campaign on the Loire with the Due d’Alençon, one of her best friends. It was completely successful and ended with a victory at Patay in which the English forces under Sir John Fastolf suffered a crushing defeat. Joan now pressed for the immediate coronation of the Dauphin. The road to Rheims had practically been cleared and the last obstacle was removed by the unexpected surrender of Troyes.
But the French leaders dallied, and only very reluctantly did they consent to follow her to Rheims where, on July 17, 1429, Charles VII was solemnly crowned, Joan standing at his side with her standard. That event, which completed the mission originally entrusted to her by her Voices, marked also the close of her military successes. A boldly planned attack on Paris failed, mainly for lack of Charles’s promised support and presence. During the action Joan was wounded in the thigh by an arrow and had to be almost dragged into safety by Alençon. Then followed a truce which entailed on the Maid a winter of inaction spent for the most part in the entourage of a worldly court, where she was regarded with thinly veiled suspicion. Upon the resumption of hostilities she hurried to the relief of Compiègne which was holding out against the Burgundians. She entered the city at sunrise on May 23, 1430, and that same day led an unsuccessful sortie. Through panic or some miscalculation on the part of the governor, the drawbridge over winch her company was retiring was raised too soon, leaving Joan and some of her men outside at the mercy of the enemy. She was dragged from her horse with howls of execration, and led to the quarters of John of Luxembourg, one of whose soldiers had been her captor. From that time until the late autumn she remained the prisoner of the Duke of Burgundy. Never during that period or afterward was the slightest effort made on her behalf by King Charles or any of his subjects. With the basest ingratitude they were content to leave her to her fate. But the English leaders desired to have her if the French did not: and on November 21 she was sold to them for a sum equivalent to about £23,000 in modern money. Once in their hands her execution was a foregone conclusion. Though they could not condemn her to death for defeating them in open warfare, they could have her sentenced as a sorceress and a heretic. In an age when fear of witchcraft was general the charge would not seem preposterous, and already the English and Burgundian soldiers attributed their reverses to her spells.
In the castle of Rouen to which she was transferred two days before Christmas Joan was confined at first—we are told, but this is doubtful—in an iron cage, for she had twice tried to escape. Afterwards she lay in a cell where, though chained to a plank bed, she was watched day and night by soldiers. On February 21, 1431, she appeared for the first time before a tribunal presided over by Peter Cauchon, bishop of Beauvais, an unscrupulous man who hoped through English influence to become archbishop of Rouen. The judges were composed of dignitaries and doctors carefully selected by Cauchon, as well as of the ordinary officials of an ecclesiastical court. During the course of six public and nine private sessions the prisoner was examined and cross-examined as to her visions and “voices”, her assumption of male attire, her faith and her willingness to submit to the Church. Alone and undefended she bore herself fearlessly, her shrewd answers and accurate memory astonishing and frequently embarrassing her questioners. Only very occasionally was she betrayed into making damaging replies, through her ignorance of theological terms and lack of education. Nevertheless, at the conclusion of the sittings a grossly unfair summing-up of her statements was drawn up and submitted first to the judges, who on the strength of it declared her revelations to have been diabolical, and then to the University of Paris, which denounced her in violent terms.
In a final deliberation the tribunal decided that she must be handed over to the secular arm as a heretic if she refused to retract. This she declined to do, though threatened with torture. Only when she was brought into the cemetery of St Ouen before a huge crowd, to be finally admonished and sentenced, was she intimidated into making some sort of retractation. The actual terms of this retractation are uncertain and have been the occasion of much controversy. She was led back to
prison but her respite was a short one. Either as the result of a trick played by those who thirsted for her blood or else deliberately of her own free-will, she resumed the male dress which she had consented to discard; and when Cauchon with some of his satellites visited her in her cell to question her concerning what they chose to regard as a relapse, they found that she had recovered from her weakness. Once again she declared that God had truly sent her and that her voices came from God. “Be of good cheer” Cauchon is reported as having exclaimed exultingly to the Earl of Warwick as he left the castle, “we shall get her again.” On Tuesday, May 29, 1431, the judges after hearing Cauchon’s report condemned her as a relapsed heretic to be delivered over to the secular arm, and the following morning at eight o’clock Joan was led out into the market-place of Rouen to be burned at the stake. Joan’s demeanour on that occasion was such as to move even the most hardened to tears. When the faggots had been lighted, a Dominican friar at her request held up a cross before her eyes, and as the flames leaped up she was heard to call upon the name of Jesus before surrendering her soul to God.
She was not yet twenty years old. After her death her ashes were contemptuously cast into the Seine, but there must have been many amongst the spectators to echo the remorseful exclamation of John Tressart, one of King Henry’s secretaries “We are lost: we have burned a saint!” Twenty—three years later Joan’s mother and her two brothers appealed for a reopening of the case, and Pope Callistus III appointed a commission for the purpose. Its labours resulted, on July 7, 1456, in the quashing of the trial and verdict and the complete rehabilitation of the Maid. Over four hundred and fifty years later, on May 26, 1920, she was canonized with all the solemnity of the Church.
This canonization was the occasion in England, as elsewhere, of a renewed and widespread interest in Joan of Arc; and there has been, almost inevitably, a tendency for various “Joan-legends” to grow up. There is the “Joan the Protestant” legend, popularized by George Bernard Shaw. Granted an inadequate understanding of Catholicism, this mistake is understandable it is nevertheless a mistake. As an accidental by-product of the same, there is the “theatre St Joan” legend, stereotyped as a pert Lancashire mill-girl with experience of festival religious drama a figure partly attractive, partly tiresome, wholly untrue. Then there is “Joan the nationalist”. A great patriot she certainly was; but when she said “France” can her supernatural Voices have meant anything else but Justice? There is “Joan the feminist”, in some ways the most foolish of these legends, both historically and in sentiment; and, of course, there is the Joan of the repositories, who may fitly be typified by the statue in Winchester cathedral. Moreover, there is the common error that the Church venerates her as a martyr.
What then was St Joan? Quite simply, a peasant girl, full of natural ability, good sense, and the grace of God; who knew, amongst other things, the story of the Annunciation, and when the will of God was made known to her, astounding as it was (though less so to her simplicity than to our sophistication), she faced it intelligently, welcomed it and submitted to it. That is what emerges from every page of the text of the original documents of her trial.  Other things as well can be learned from them, some of them little gratifying to Catholics; for though the tribunal that condemned her was not the Church, nevertheless it, and the ecclesiastics who upheld its decisions, included some honest and representative churchmen. It also included others who were not. The dealings with the Maid are an ineffaceable blot on the history of England. The Englishmen concerned were not the only people who earned disgrace.  No adequate bibliography of St Jeanne d’Arc is possible within these narrow limits. The list made in 1906 by Canon U. Chevalier contains some 1500 entries, and this was before she was even beatified. Innumerable books and articles have been written since then.

No adequate bibliography of St Jeanne d’Arc is possible within these narrow limits. The list made in 1906 by Canon U. Chevalier contains some 1500 entries, and this was before she was even beatified. Innumerable books and articles have been written since then. The most important sources were first published in Quicherat’s Procès de Condamnation et Réhabili­tation, 5 vols. (1841—1849); these are in Latin, but may be read in translations, e.g. by P. Champion in French and T. D. Murray in English, and the record of the trial only, by W. P. Barrett (1931). There is also a vast collection of materials, mostly translated, in the five volumes of Fr Ayroles, La Vraie Jeanne d’Arc (1890—1901), but it is unfortunate that the polemical note is here so much emphasized. The same exception may also be taken to the otherwise excellent books of Canon Dunand, Histoire complete de Jeanne d’Arc, 4 vols. (1912) and Etudes Critiques, 4 vols. (1909). Consult further Denifle’s Chartularium Universitatis Parisiensis, with its supplement; and C. Lemire, Le Procès de Jeanne d’Arc; and for biblio­graphies see the Cambridge Medieval History, vol. viii, pp. 871 seq., and J. Calmette, La France et l’Angleterre en Conflit (1937), pp. 405 seq. The following biographies and studies in French may be mentioned by L. H. Petitot (1921); M. Gasquet (1929); P. Champion (1934); Funck-Brentano (1943); J. Cordier (1948). No one has written more convincingly on the subject in English than Andrew Lang, The Maid of France (1908), especially in his criticism of Anatole France’s misleading Vie. Other English works are by Hilaire Belloc (1930), C. F. Oddie (1931) and V. Sackville West (1937). For a consideration of Bernard Shaw’s Saint Joan, see Fr Bede Jarrett in Blackfriars, May 1924, pp. 67 seq., and cf. E. Robo, St, Joan (1948), which includes a letter from Shaw. Fr Paul Doncoeur’s La minute française des interrogatoires de Jeanne Ia Pucelle (1952) is important. There is a highly recommended assessment of evidence, literature and general judgement on St Joan in La Vie Spirituelle, January 1954, pp. 84—98.

St. Joan of Arc is the patroness of soldiers and of France.  On January 6, 1412, Joan of Arc was born to pious parents of the French peasant class, at the obscure village of Domremy, near the province of Lorraine. At a very early age, she heard voices: those of St. Michael, St. Catherine and St. Margaret.  At first the messages were personal and general. Then at last came the crowning order. In May, 1428, her voices "of St. Michael, St. Catherine, and St. Margaret" told Joan to go to the King of France and help him reconquer his kingdom. For at that time the English king was after the throne of France, and the Duke of Burgundy, the chief rival of the French king, was siding with him and gobbling up evermore French territory.
After overcoming opposition from churchmen and courtiers, the seventeen year old girl was given a small army with which she raised the seige of Orleans on May 8, 1429. She then enjoyed a series of spectacular military successes, during which the King was able to enter Rheims and be crowned with her at his side.

In May 1430, as she was attempting to relieve Compiegne, she was captured by the Burgundians and sold to the English when Charles and the French did nothing to save her. After months of imprisonment, she was tried at Rouen by a tribunal presided over by the infamous Peter Cauchon, Bishop of Beauvais, who hoped that the English would help him to become archbishop.

Through her unfamiliarity with the technicalities of theology, Joan was trapped into making a few damaging statements. When she refused to retract the assertion that it was the saints of God who had commanded her to do what she had done, she was condemned to death as a heretic, sorceress, and adulteress, and burned at the stake on May 30, 1431. She was nineteen years old. Some thirty years later, she was exonerated of all guilt and she was ultimately canonized in 1920, making official what the people had known for centuries
1401 Blessed Andrew Franchi bishop of Pistoia, an office he filled with distinction and holiness for 23 years good religious and an able administrator served as prior in three convents while still quite young, OP B (AC)
1401 BD ANDREW, BISHOP OF PIST0IA
Bd ANDREW was a member of the noble family of the Franchi Boccagni of Pistoia, his native city, and early entered the Dominican Order. A great preacher, he was also endowed with administrative powers which led to his being made prior of three convents in Italy. In 1378 he was appointed bishop of Pistoia. For twenty-three years he ruled his diocese wisely and well, promoting peace and spending his revenues on the restoration of churches and the relief of the poor. As a bishop he led a life of extreme simplicity, striving as far as possible to observe the rule to which he had been bound as a simple friar. A year before his death he resigned his office and retired to his old convent in Pistoia, where he prepared himself for the end. He died on May 26, 1401. In 1921 Pope Benedict XV sanctioned his cultus for the Dominicans and for the diocese of Pistoia.

In the decree confirming the cultus (see the Acta Apostolicae Sedis, vol. xiv, 1922, pp. 16—19) there is a short biographical summary. A longer account will he found in the Année Dominicaine, vol. V (1891), pp. 689—693; and in 1922 Fr Taurisano published a brief life in Italian.

Born in Pistoia, Italy, in 1335; beatified in 1921. Blessed Andrew was born into the noble dei Franchi Boccagni family. He entered the Dominican Order at Pistoia about 1351, when the Italian peninsula was still under the shadow of the plague and was deeply involved in fratricidal wars. Another theory has it that he entered at Florence in 1348, which was the year the plague reached its peak. Whichever date he entered, he did so to give attention to his immortal soul, at a time when the world around him was apparently falling to pieces.

Andrew proved to be a good religious and an able administrator. He served as prior in three convents while still quite young. In 1378, he was appointed bishop of Pistoia, an office he filled with distinction and holiness for 23 years.

It is written of Andrew that he devoted himself to the poor, and spent his revenues to relieve their misery and to rebuild the ruined churches. He had a great personal devotion to Our Lady, to the Holy Childhood, and to the Three Holy Kings. As bishop, he lived a life of extreme simplicity, retaining his religious habit, and as much as he could of the rule. A year before his death, he resigned his office and retired to die at his old convent of Pistoia (Benedictines, Dorcy).
1252 St. Ferdinand III of Castile extremely devoted to the Blessed Virgin Patron of engineers conquered the city of Cordoba from the Moors founded the Cathedral of Burgos University of Salamanca a great administrator and a man of deep faith. He founded hospitals and bishoprics, monasteries, chuches, and cathedrals during his reign. He also compiled and reformed a code of laws which were used until the modern era. Ferdinand rebuilt the Cathedral of Burgos and changed the mosque in Seville into a Cathedral. He was a just ruler, frequently pardoning former offenders to his throne; buried in the habit of his secular Franciscan Order
Híspali, in Hispánia, sancti Ferdinándi Tértii, Castéllæ et Legiónis Regis, ob virtútum præstántiam cognoménto Sancti; qui, fídei propagándæ zelo clarus, tandem, devíctis Mauris, ad cæléste regnum, terréno relícto, felíciter evolávit.
    At Seville in Spain, St. Ferdinand III, king of Castile and Leon.  He was surnamed the Saint on account of his eminent virtues; he was celebrated for his zeal in spreading the faith.  After conquering the Moors he left his kingdom on earth to pass happily to that of heaven.
1252 ST FERDINAND III OF CASTILE
THE father of Ferdinand III was Alfonso IX, king of Leon, and his mother was Berengaria, who was the elder daughter of Alfonso III, king of Castile: her mother was a daughter of Henry II of England, and her sister Blanche became the mother of St Louis of France. The death of her brother Henry in 1217 left Berengaria heiress to the throne of Castile, but she resigned her rights in favour of her eighteen-year-old son Ferdinand. Two years later he married Beatrice, daughter of King Philip of Swabia, and they had seven sons and three daughters.
Ferdinand was severe in the administration of justice, but readily forgave personal injuries. His wisdom showed itself particularly in the choice he made of governors, magistrates and generals; the archbishop of Toledo, Rodrigo Ximenes, was chancellor of Castile and his principal adviser for many years. In 1230, on the death of his father, Ferdinand became king also of Leon, but not without strife, for there were those who supported the claim of his two half-sisters.
King Ferdinand was the real founder of the great University of Salamanca; but it is as the tireless and successful campaigner against the Moors that he impressed himself on the minds and hearts of Spaniards. For twenty-seven years he was engaged in almost uninterrupted warfare with the oppressors. He drove them out of Ubeda in 1234, Cordova (1236), Murcia, Jaen, Cadiz and finally Seville itself (1249). It was at the battle of Xeres, when only ten Spanish lives were lost, that St James was said to have been seen leading the host on a white horse, in thanksgiving for his victories, Ferdinand rebuilt the cathedral of Burgos and turned the great mosque of Seville into a church. Unlike some warriors he was a forbearing ruler: it is remembered of him that he said that he “feared the curse of one old woman more than a whole army of Moors”; and he fought primarily not to extend his territories but to rescue Christian people from the dominion of infidels.
On the death of Queen Beatrice, Ferdinand married Joan of Ponthieu, who bore him two sons and a daughter: that daughter was Eleanor, who became the wife of Edward I of England. He himself died on May 30, 1252, and was buried in the cathedral of Seville in the habit of the Friars Minor. Ferdinand was declared a saint by Pope Clement X in 1671.
The Bollandists in the Acta Sanctorum, May, vol. vii, have translated into Latin those portions of the chronicle of Rodrigo Ximenes, archbishop of Toledo (referred to above), which refer to St Ferdinand. With this we have also the summary account of Luke, bishop of Tuy, who was likewise a contemporary, and other miscellaneous documents. Further, there is preserved a narrative by the Franciscan, Giles of Zamora (c. AD. 1300). This will be found in the Detain de la real Academia de la Historia, vol. v (1884), pp. 308—321. St Ferdinand, of course, plays a conspicuous part in all Spanish histories which cover this period. Among modern biographies may be mentioned those by J. Laurentie in French (1910), F. Maccono in Italian (1924), and a popular life in Spanish by J. R. Coloma (1928).

Ferdinand III of Castile was the son of Alfonso IX, King of Leon, and Berengaria, daughter of Alfonso III, King of Castile (Spain). He was declared king of Castile at age eighteen. Ferdinand was born near Salamanca; proclaimed king of Palencia, Valladolid, and Burgos; his mother advised and assisted him during his young reign.
He married Princess Beatrice, daughter of Philip of Suabia, King of Germany and they had seven sons and three daughters. His father (the king of Leon) turned against him and tried to take over his rule. The two reconciled later, and fought successfully against the Moors. In 1225, he held back Islamic invaders; prayed and fasted to prepare for the war; extremely devoted to the Blessed Virgin. Between 1234-36, Ferdinand conquered the city of Cordoba from the Moors. Queen Beatrice died in 1236, and he overtook Seville shortly thereafter. He founded the Cathedral of Burgos and the University of Salamanca; married Joan of Ponthieu after the death of Beatrice. He died on May 30th after a prolonged illness, and buried in the habit of his secular Franciscan Order. His remains are preserved in the Cathedral of Seville and was canonized by Pope Clement X in 1671. Ferdinand was a great administrator and a man of deep faith. He founded hospitals and bishoprics, monasteries, chuches, and cathedrals during his reign. He also compiled and reformed a code of laws which were used until the modern era. Ferdinand rebuilt the Cathedral of Burgos and changed the mosque in Seville into a Cathedral. He was a just ruler, frequently pardoning former offenders to his throne.
1085 St. Gregory VII Hildebrand directed his reformer’s attention, first as counselor to the popes and later (1073-1085) as pope The Gregorian Reform, a milestone in the history of Christ’s Church, was named after this man who tried to extricate the papacy and the whole Church from undue control by civil rulers. Against an unhealthy Church nationalism in some areas, Gregory reasserted the unity of the whole Church based on Christ and expressed in the bishop of Rome, the successor of St. Peter.

b.-1020 The tenth century and the first half of the eleventh were dark days for the Church, partly because the papacy was the pawn of various Roman families. In 1049, things began to change when Pope Leo IX, a reformer, was elected. He brought a young monk named Hildebrand to Rome as his counselor and special representative on important missions. He was to become Gregory VII.

Three evils plagued the Church then: simony (the buying and selling of sacred offices and things), the unlawful marriage of the clergy and lay investiture (kings and nobles controlling the appointment of Church officials). To all of these Hildebrand directed his reformer’s attention, first as counselor to the popes and later (1073-1085) as pope himself.

Gregory’s papal letters stress the role of bishop of Rome as the vicar of Christ and the visible center of unity in the Church. He is well known for his long dispute with Holy Roman Emperor Henry IV over who should control the selection of bishops and abbots.
Gregory fiercely resisted any attack on the liberty of the Church. For this he suffered and finally died in exile. He said, “I have loved justice and hated iniquity; therefore I die in exile.” Thirty years later the Church finally won its struggle against lay investiture.

Comment: The Gregorian Reform, a milestone in the history of Christ’s Church, was named after this man who tried to extricate the papacy and the whole Church from undue control by civil rulers. Against an unhealthy Church nationalism in some areas, Gregory reasserted the unity of the whole Church based on Christ and expressed in the bishop of Rome, the successor of St. Peter. Quote:  Gregory has much to say to our age in which civil or national religion is making subtle demands: “In every country, even the poorest of women is permitted to take a lawful husband according to the law of the land and by her own choice; but, through the desires and evil practices of the wicked, Holy Church, the bride of God and mother of us all, is not permitted lawfully to cling to her spouse on earth in accordance with divine law and her own will” (A Call to the Faithful).
1016 St. Walstan Penitent and model of charity and intense personal goodness, spending his life in prayer gave away his goods and worked as a farmhand
Born at Bawburgh, near Norwich, England, he was renowned for his charity and intense personal goodness, spending his life in prayer. Wealthy, he gave away his goods and worked as a farmhand at Taverham and Costessey. Walstan became a popular saint in the area of Norwich and became the hero of various legends. His shrine at Bawburgh was much visited until the English Reformation of the sixteenth century when it was destroyed.

1016 ST WALSTAN

NOT much can be stated with any certainty regarding St Walstan. There is no notice of him in the Dictionary of National Biography, and Sir T. D. Hardy in his Materials relating to the History of Great Britain and Ireland refers only to the account given in Capgrave, Nova Legenda Angliae. But it is possible that Alban Butler had before him a copy of some manuscript materials which have now perished, perhaps in the fire which so seriously damaged the Cottonian collection. He wrote at any rate of St Walstan as follows, appealing, besides Capgrave and Blomfield’s history of Norfolk, to “an old manuscript Life”

“St Walstan was formerly much honoured at Cossey and Bawburgh, commonly called Baber, two villages four miles from Norwich. He was born at Baber, and of a rich and honourable family. The name of his father was Benedict, that of his mother Blida. By their example and good instructions he, from his infancy, conceived an ardent desire to devote himself to God, with the greatest perfection possible. In this view, at twelve years of age, he renounced his patrimony, left his father’s house, and entered as a poor servant at Taverham, a village adjoining to Cossey. He was so charitable that he gave his own victuals to the poor, and sometimes even his shoes, going himself barefoot. He applied himself to the meanest and most painful country labour in a perfect spirit of penance and humility; fasted much, and sanctified his soul and all his actions by assiduous, fervent prayer, and the constant union of his heart with God. He made a vow of celibacy, but never embraced a monastic state.

“God honoured his humility before men by many miracles. He died in the midst of a meadow where he was at work, on the 3oth of May in 1016. His body was interred at Baber it was carried thither through Cossey or Costessey, where a well still bears his name, as does another which was more famous at Baber, a little below the church. These places were much resorted to by pilgrims, especially to implore the intercession of this saint for the cure of fevers, palsies, lameness and blindness. His body was enshrined in the north chapel of that church, which chapel was on that account pulled down in the reign of Henry VIII though the church is still standing. All the mowers and husbandmen in these parts constantly visited it once a year, and innumerable other pilgrims resorted to it, not only from all parts of England, but also from beyond the seas. The church is sacred to the memory of the Blessed Virgin and of St Walstan.”

Father Joseph Stevenson, s.j., in certain manuscript notes he has left concerning the English saints, adds these details “ St Walstan, after giving away his shoes, loaded thorns in a cart without suffering any injury. His master offered to adopt him, but he refused, accepting, however, the gift of a cow, which produced two calves at one birth. When his approaching death was notified to him in a vision, he ordered his body to be placed on a cart drawn by two oxen who should be suffered to go on until they stopped of their own accord. They proceeded towards Costesheya (Cossey), and, though they passed through some water, the wheel-tracks then made are said to remain to the present day. The oxen came to a stop at Bawburgh, and there his body is buried.”

In the British Martyrology, compiled by Bishop Challoner with the title, A Memorial of Ancient British Piety (1765), there is a brief mention of St Walstan under May 30. On the other hand, the name is apparently not to be found in any surviving pre-Reformation calendar, nor does it figure in the “Martiloge” of R. Whitford (1526) nor in that of Father Wilson (1608 and 1640). The Bollandists, writing in the seventeenth century, would seem never to have heard of St Walstan, for he is not mentioned even among the “ Praetermissi”of May 30. Fr Paul Grosjean, Bollandist, suggests that the old life of the saint known to Butler may be identified with the English life in 75 stanzas now at Lambeth see Proceedings of the Norfolk and Norwich Arch. Soc., vol. xix, p. 250. It is a transcript from a parchment affixed to a triptych at the saint’s shrine in Bawburgh church.
714 St. Hubert Benedictine monk at the age of twelve at the abbey of Bretigny, near Noyon, France
Sometimes called Hugbert. He became a monk at the age of twelve at the abbey of Bretigny, near Noyon, France. 
655 St. Madelgisilus (Mauguille) disciple of St Fursey hermit disciple of St Fursey hermit with St Pulgan
Born in Ireland, he was disciple of St Fursey. After some years of monastic life at St Riquier in France, he went to live as a hermit with St Pulgan near Monstrelet.
Irish monk and companion of St. Fursey. Also known as Mauguille, Maguil, or Mauguil, he accompanied St. Fursey from Ireland to England and then to France. He became a monk at Saint-Riquier when St. Fursey died. He then left the monastery to avoid the adulation of his fellow monks and became a hermit at Monstrelet with St. Vulgan.

655 ST MADELGISILUS, OR MAUGUJLLE

ST MADELGISILUS, or Mauguille, is said to have been an Irishman and the com­panion of St Fursey, with whom he went to England and afterwards to Gaul. After the death of St Fursey, Madelgisilus joined the monks of Saint-Riquier or Centula. Dismayed at finding himself regarded with veneration by his brethren, he obtained leave from the abbot to retire into the solitude of Monstrelet, on the river Authie. Here he lived an austere life of contemplation alone until he was visited by a holy English recluse named Vulgan who, finding him very ill, nursed him back to health. A great friendship sprang up between them and they continued to practise the eremitic life side by side until Vulgan’s death. St Madelgisilus did not long survive his friend. He was buried in the hermitage chapel, but his relics were afterwards removed to a church of his name built near Saint-Riquier.

A life by Hariulphus, who, though he wrote as late as the beginning of the twelfth century, was a painstaking compiler, is printed in the Acta Sanctorum, May, vol. vii. See also Corbiet, Hagiographie du diocese d’Amiens, vol. iii, pp.226 seq., and cf Gougaud, Gaelic Pioneers of Christianity, pp. 19 and 134.
628 St. Anastasius XV Bishop convert from the heresy of Arianism, appointed bishop of Pavia in Lombardy, Italy
Papíæ sancti Anastásii Epíscopi.      At Pavia, St. Anastasius, bishop.
Sometimes listed as Anastasius II. He was a convert from the heresy of Arianism, appointed bishop of Pavia in Lombardy, Italy Anastasius served from 668 to 680.
410 Saint Isaac of Constantinople bravely defended the Catholic faith against the Arian Emperor Valens, whom he publicly denounced Abbot (AC)
Saint Isaac bravely defended the Catholic faith against the Arian Emperor Valens, whom he publicly denounced. Isaac narrowly escaped death, and became a monk, then abbot, of a large monastery in Constantinople (Benedictines).

410 ST ISAAC OF CONSTANTINOPLE, ABBOT

WHEN the Arian Emperor Valens was persecuting his Catholic subjects, a hermit named Isaac was inspired to leave his solitude in order to remonstrate with the monarch. Coming• to Constantinople he warned the emperor several times that unless he ceased his oppression and restored to the Catholics the churches which he had given to the Arians, a great disaster awaited him and a miserable end. Valens treated these warnings with scorn and on one occasion when the hermit seized the bridle of his horse as he was riding out of the city, he gave orders that the prophet should be thrown into a neighbouring swamp. Isaac escaped— miraculously as it seemed—but on repeating his prophecy he was put in prison. His words were fulfilled shortly afterwards, for the emperor was defeated and killed at the battle of Adrianople. St Isaac was released by the successor of Valens, Theodosius, who always held him in great veneration. The holy man attempted to resume the solitary life, but soon found himself surrounded by disciples who A refused to leave him. For them he founded a monastery which is said to have been the oldest in Constantinople. From St Dalmatus, one of St Isaac’s disciples and his successor, it was afterwards called the Dalmatian monastery. St Isaac took part in the first Council of Constantinople — usually described as the second ecumenical council of the Church; and he died at an advanced age.

A Greek life of St Isaac is printed in the seventh volume for May of the Acts Sanctorum, from the last paragraph of which it has been inferred that the saint died in 383. This, however, is a mistake, as J. Pargoire has shown in Échos d’Orient, vol. ii (1899), pp. 138-145 the one reliable life of St Dalmatus proves that Isaac must have lived at least until 406. See the Analecta Bollandiana, vol. xviii (1899), pp. 430—431.
400 St. Venantius Hermit brother of St. Honoratus Both lived on an island near Cannes, France, until they departed to embrace the monastic life in the Eastern Empire.Venantius died at Medon, in Morea (modern Greece).

Pope Francis  PRAYER INTENTIONS FOR  May 2016
Universal:   “That in every country in the world, women may be honoured and respected
and that their essential contribution to society may be highly esteemed”.

Evangelization:  “That families, communities and groups may pray the Holy Rosary for evangelisation and peace”.
God Bless Mother Angelica 1923-2016
ewtnmissionaries.com

On Death and Life
"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!
   (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)


 40 Days for Life  We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
40 days for Life Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world

It is a great poverty that a child must die so that you may live as you wish -- Mother Teresa
 Saving babies, healing moms and dads, 'The Gospel of Life'
May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.

Jesus brings us many Blessings
 
The more we pray, the more we wish to pray. Like a fish which at first swims on the surface of the water, and afterwards plunges down, and is always going deeper; the soul plunges, dives, and loses itself in the sweetness of conversing with God. -- St. John Vianney

  Month by Month of Saintly Dedications


The Rosary html Mary Mother of GOD -- Her Rosary Here
Mary Mother of GOD Mary's Divine Motherhood: FEASTS OF OUR LADY
     of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

May 9 – Our Lady of the Wood (Italy, 1607) 
Months of Dedication
January is the month of the Holy Name of Jesus since 1902;
March is the month of Saint Joseph since 1855;
May, the month of Mary, is the oldest and most well-known Marian month, officially since 1724;
June is the month of the Sacred Heart since 1873;
July is the month of the Precious Blood since 1850;
August is the month of the Immaculate Heart of Mary;
September is the month of Our Lady of Sorrows since 1857;
October is the month of the Rosary since 1868;
November is the month of the Holy Souls in Purgatory since 1888;
December is the month of the Immaculate Conception.

In all, five months of the year are dedicated to Mary.
The idea of dedicating months came from Rome and promotion of the month of Mary owes much to the Jesuits.  arras.catholique.fr


Pray that the witness of 40 Days for Life bears abundant fruit, and that we begin again each day to storm the gates of hell until God welcomes us into the gates of heaven.

If you seek patience, you will find no better example than the cross. Great patience occurs in two ways:
either when one patiently suffers much, or when one suffers things which one is able to avoid and yet does not avoid.
Christ endured much on the cross, and did so patiently, because when he suffered he did not threaten;
he was led like a sheep to the slaughter and he did not open his mouth.-- St. Thomas Aquinas


We begin our day by seeing Christ in the consecrated bread, and throughout the day we continue to see Him in the torn bodies of our poor. We pray, that is, through our work, performing it with Jesus, for Jesus and upon Jesus.
The poor are our prayer. They carry God in them. Prayer means praying everything, praying the work.
We meet the Lord who hungers and thirsts, in the poor.....and the poor could be you or I or any person kind enough to show us his or her love and to come to our place.
Because we cannot see Christ, we cannot express our love to Him in person.
But our neighbor we can see, and we can do for him or her what we would love to do for Jesus if He were visible.
-- Mother Teresa
My God, I believe, I adore, I trust and I love Thee.  I beg pardon for those who do not believe, do not adore, do not love Thee.  O most Holy trinity, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, I adore Thee profoundly.
 I offer Thee the most precious Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ, present in all the Tabernacles of the world,  in reparation for the outrages, sacrileges and indifference by which He is offended,
and by the infite merits of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

I beg the conversion of poor sinners,  Amen Fatima Prayer, Angel of Peace
Mary's Divine Motherhood
Pope Francis and Pope Benedict XVI { 2013 } Catholic Church In China { article here}
1648 to1930 St. Augustine Zhao Rong and 120 Companions Christianity arrived in China by way of Syria -- 600s.
        Depending on China's relations with outside world,
Christianity for centuries was free to grow or forced to operate secretly.

How do I start the Five First Saturdays? 
Called in the Gospel “the Mother of Jesus,” Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as “the Mother of my Lord” (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity. Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos). 
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
“The Blessed Virgin was eternally predestined, in conjunction with the incarnation of the divine Word, to be the Mother of God. By decree of divine Providence, she served on earth as the loving mother of the divine Redeemer, an associate of unique nobility, and the Lord's humble handmaid. She conceived, brought forth, and nourished Christ.”
The voice of the Father is heard, the Son enters the water, and the Holy Spirit appears in the form of a dove.
   THE spirit and example of the world imperceptibly instil the error into the minds of many that there is a kind of middle way of going to Heaven; and so, because the world does not live up to the gospel, they bring the gospel down to the level of the world. It is not by this example that we are to measure the Christian rule, but words and life of Christ. All His followers are commanded to labour to become perfect even as our heavenly Father is perfect, and to bear His image in our hearts that we may be His children. We are obliged by the gospel to die to ourselves by fighting self-love in our hearts, by the mastery of our passions, by taking on the spirit of our Lord.
   These are the conditions under which Christ makes His promises and numbers us among His children, as is manifest from His words which the apostles have left us in their inspired writings. Here is no distinction made or foreseen between the apostles or clergy or religious and secular persons. The former, indeed, take upon themselves certain stricter obligations, as a means of accomplishing these ends more perfectly; but the law of holiness and of disengagement of the heart from the world is geeral and binds all the followers of Christ.

Join Mary of Nazareth Project help us build the International Marian Center of Nazareth
http://www.worldpriest.com/
THE EUCHARIST, A MYSTERY TO BE BELIEVED POST-SYNODAL APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION
SACRAMENTUM CARITATIS OF THE HOLY FATHER BENEDICT XVI
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Miracles by Century 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000    1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800   1900  Miracles_BLay Saints
Morning Prayer and Hymn    Meditation of the Day    Prayer for Priests    Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List  Here
We are called upon with the whole Church militant on earth to join in praising and thanking God for the grace and glory he has bestowed on his saints. At the same time we earnestly implore Him to exert His almighty power and mercy in raising us from our miseries and sins, healing the disorders of our souls and leading us by the path of repentance to the company of His saints, to which He has called us.
   They were once what we are now, travellers on earth they had the same weaknesses, which we have. We have difficulties to encounter so had the saints, and many of them far greater than we can meet with; obstacles from kings and whole nations, sometimes from the prisons, racks and swords of persecutors. Yet they surmounted these difficulties, which they made the very means of their virtue and victories. It was by the strength they received from above, not by their own, that they triumphed. But the blood of Christ was shed for us as it was for them and the grace of our Redeemer is not wanting to us; if we fail, the failure is in ourselves.
   THE saints and just, from the beginning of time and throughout the world, who have been made perfect, everlasting monuments of God’s infinite power and clemency, praise His goodness without ceasing; casting their crowns before His throne they give to Him all the glory of their triumphs: “His gifts alone in us He crowns.”
“The saints must be honored as friends of Christ and children and heirs of God, as John the theologian and evangelist says: ‘But as many as received him, he gave them the power to be made the sons of God....’ Let us carefully observe the manner of life of all the apostles, martyrs, ascetics and just men who announced the coming of the Lord. And let us emulate their faith, charity, hope, zeal, life, patience under suffering, and perseverance unto death, so that we may also share their crowns of glory” Exposition of the Orthodox Faith

Called in the Gospel the Mother of Jesus, Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as the Mother of my Lord (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son,  the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos).
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart ... From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque
On Friday during Holy Communion, He said these words to me, His unworthy slave, if I mistake not:
I promise you in the excessive mercy of my Heart that its all-powerful love will grant to all those who receive Holy Communion on nine first Fridays of consecutive months the grace of final repentance; they will not die under my displeasure or without receiving their sacraments, my divine Heart making itself their assured refuge at the last moment.
Margaret Mary was inspired by Christ to establish the Holy Hour and to pray lying prostrate with her face to the ground from eleven till midnight on the eve of the first Friday of each month, to share in the mortal sadness.
He endured when abandoned by His Apostles in His Agony, and to receive holy Communion on the first Friday of every month. In the first great revelation, He made known to her His ardent desire to be loved by men and His design of manifesting His Heart with all Its treasures of love and mercy, of sanctification and salvation.
He appointed the Friday after the octave of the feast of Corpus Christi as the feast of the Sacred Heart; He called her the Beloved Disciple of the Sacred Heart, and the heiress of all Its treasures. The love of the Sacred Heart was the fire which consumed her, and devotion to the Sacred Heart is the refrain of all her writings. In her last illness she refused all alleviation, repeating frequently: What have I in heaven and what do I desire on earth, but Thee alone, O my God, and died pronouncing the Holy Name of Jesus.
With regard to this promise it may be remarked: (1) that our Lord required Communion to be received on a particular day chosen by Him; (2) that the nine Fridays must be consecutive; (3) that they must be made in honor of His Sacred Heart, which means that those who make the nine Fridays must practice the devotion and must have a great love for our Lord; (4) that our Lord does not say that those who make the nine Fridays will be dispensed from any of their obligations or from exercising the vigilance necessary to lead a good life and overcome temptation; rather He implicitly promises abundant graces to those who make the nine Fridays to help them to carry out these obligations and persevere to the end; (5) that perseverance in receiving Holy Communion for nine consecutive First Firdays helps the faithful to acquire the habit of frequent Communion, which our Lord eagerly desires; and (6) that the practice of the nine Fridays is very pleasing to our Lord He promises such great reward, and all Catholics should endeavor to make nine Fridays.
How do I start the Five First Saturdays? by Fr. Tom O'Mahony.
On July 13,1917, Our Lady appeared for the third time to the three children of Fatima an showed them the vision of hell and made the now - famous thirteen prophecies. In this vision Our Lady said that 'GOD WISHES TO ESTABLISH IN THE WORLD DEVOTION to Her Immaculate Heart and that She would come TO ASK FOR THE COMMUNION OF REPARATION ON THE FIRST SATURDAYS...'  Eight years later, on December 10, 1925, Our Lady did indeed come back. She appeared (with the Child Jesus) to Lucia in the convent of the Dorothean Sisters in Pontevedra.
The Child Jesus spoke first:
'HAVE COMPASSION ON THE HEART OF YOUR MOST HOLY MOTHER WHICH IS COVERED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT, WHILE THERE IS NO ONE TO REMOVE THEM WITH AN ACT OF REPARATION.'

THE GREAT PROMISE
Our Lady then said: 'MY DAUGHTER LOOK AT MY HEART SURROUNDED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT BY THEIR BLASPHEMIES AND INGRATITUDE. YOU, AT LEAST, TRY TO CONSOLE ME, AND SAY THAT I PROMISE TO ASSIST AT THE HOUR OF DEATH WITH ALL THE GRACES NECESSARY FOR SALVATION, ALL THOSE WHO, ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS GO TO CONFESSION AND RECEIVE HOLY COMMUNION, RECITE FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY AND KEEP ME COMPANY FOR A QUARTER OF AN HOUR WHILE MEDITATING ON MYSTERIES OF THE ROSARY, WITH THE INTENTION OF MAKING REPARATION TO ME.'

The Five Reasons
Lucia once asked this question of Our Lord and received as an answer: 'MY DAUGHTER, THE MOTIVE IS SIMPLE, THERE ARE FIVE KINDS OF OFFENCES AND BLASPHEMIES UTTERED AGAINST THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY: (1) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION: (2) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER VIRGINITY: (3) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER DIVINE MATERNITY: (4) BLASPHEMIES OF THOSE WHO OPENLY SEEK TO FOSTER IN THE HEARTS OF CHILDREN INDIFFERENCE OR EVEN HATRED FOR THIS IMMACULATE MOTHER: (5) THE OFFENCES OF THOSE WHO DIRECTLY OUTRAGE HER IN HOLY IMAGES.'
From the above, it is easy to see that each of the Five Saturdays can correspond to a specific offence. By offering the graces received during each First Saturday as reparation for the offence being prayed for, the participant can hope to help remove the thorns from Our Lady's Heart.
What Do I Have To Do?
The devotion of First Saturdays, as requested by Our Lady of Fatima, carries with it the assurance of salvation. However, to derive profit from such a great promise of Our Lady, the devotion must be properly understood and duly performed.
The requirements as stipulated by Our Lady are as follows:
(1) CONFESSION, (2) COMMUNION, (3) FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY, (4) MEDITATION ON ONE OR MORE OF THE ROSARY MYSTERIES FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES, (5) TO DO ALL THESE THINGS IN THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION TO THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY, and (6) TO OBSERVE ALL THESE PRACTICES ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS.
(1) CONFESSION: A reparative confession means that the confession should not only be good (valid and licit), but also be offered in the spirit of reparation, in this case, to Mary's Immaculate Heart. This confession may be made on the First Saturday itself or some days before or after the First Saturday within the preceding octave would suffice.
(2) COMMUNION: The communion of reparation must be sacramental duly received with the intention of making reparation. This offering, like the confession, is an interior act and so no external action to express the intention is needed.
(3) THE ROSARY: The Rosary mentioned here was indicated by the Portuguese word 'terco' which is commonly employed to denote a Rosary of five decades, since it forms a fourth of the full Rosary of 20 decades. This too must recited in a spirit of reparation.
(4) MEDITATION FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES: Here the meditation on one mystery or more is to be made without simultaneous recitation of the Rosary decade. As indicated, the meditation may be either on one mystery alone for 15 minutes, or on all 20 mysteries, spending about one minute on each mystery, or again, on two or more mysteries during the period. This can also be made before each decade spending three minutes or more in considering the mystery of the particular decade. This meditation has likewise to be made in the spirit of reparation to the Immaculate Heart.
(5) THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION: All these acts, as said above, have to be done with the intention of offering reparation to the Immaculate Heart of Mary for the offences committed against Her. Everyone who offends Her commits, so to speak, a two-fold offence, for these sins also offend her Divine Son, Christ, and so endanger our salvation. They give bad example to others and weaken the strength of society to withstand immoral onslaughts. Such devotions therefore make us consider not only the enormity of the offence against God, but also the effect of sins on human society as well as the need for undoing these social effects even when the offender repents and is converted. Further, this reparation emphasises our responsibility towards sinners who, themselves, will not pray and make reparation for their sins.
(6) FIVE CONSECUTIVE FIRST SATURDAYS: The idea of the Five First Saturdays is obviously to make us persevere in the devotional acts for these Saturdays and overcome initial difficulties. Once this is done, Our Lady knows that the person would become devoted to Her immaculate Heart and persist in practising such devotion on all First Saturdays, working thereby for personal self-reform and for the salvation of others.

Unless Russia is converted, the movement against God and for sin will continue to spread, promoting wars and persecutions, and making the attainment for peace and justice impossible for this world. One means of obtaining Russia's conversion is to practise the Fatima Message. The stakes are so great that to encourage Catholics to practise the devotion of the First Saturdays, Our Lady has assured us that She will obtain salvation for all those who observe the first Saturdays for five consecutive months in accordance with Her conditions.
At the supreme moment the departing person will be either in the state of grace or not. In either case Our Lady will be by his side. If in the state of grace, She will console and help him to resist whatever temptations the devil might put before him in his last attempt to take the person with him to hell. If not in the state of grace, Our Lady will help the person to repent in a manner agreeable to God and so benefit by the fruits of redemption and be saved.

God loves variety. He doesn't mass-produce his saints. Every saint is unique, for each is the result of a new idea.  As the liturgy says: Non est inventus similis illis--there are no two exactly alike. It is we with our lack of imagination, who paint the same haloes on all the saints. Dear Lord, grant us a spirit that is not bound by our own ideas and preferences.  Grant that we may be able to appreciate in others what we lack in ourselves. O Lord, grant that we may understand that every saint must be a unique praise of Your glory. Catholic saints are holy people and human people who lived extraordinary lives.  Each saint the Church honors responded to God's invitation to use his or her unique gifts.   God calls each one of us to be a saint in order to get into heavenonly saints are allowed into heaven. The more "extravagant" graces are bestowed NOT for the benefit of the recipients so much as FOR the benefit of others.
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

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