Mary Mother of GOD 15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary
40 Days for Life  11,000+ saved lives in 2015
 Sunday   Saints of this Day November 13 Idus Novémbris    
Et álibi aliórum plurimórum sanctórum Mártyrum et Confessórum, atque sanctárum Vírginum.
And elsewhere in divers places, many other holy martyrs, confessors, and holy virgins.
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас! (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)

St. Frances Xavier Cabrini, Virgin (Memorial)

Six Canonized on Feast of Christ the King Nov 23 2014

CAUSES OF SAINTS April  2014

Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List

Acts of the Apostles

Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

How do I start the Five First Saturdays?

Mary Mother of GOD 15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary




After a record-breaking 2015 — surpassing 11,000+ saved lives and 64 closed abortion centers — you are about to learn how 40 Days for Life is going ALL IN for the crucial year of 2016:
 
You are invited to attend a LIVE worldwide streaming video webcast, where you’ll discover:
Why Planned Parenthood and the abortion industry are at an all-time low ... and how to ensure their downward spiral continues to accelerate
How the videos exposing Planned Parenthood's barbaric practice of harvesting and trafficking in aborted baby body parts are multiplying the effectiveness of life-saving efforts
The staggering results your prayers and efforts helped to achieve — in 307 cities around the globe — during the just-completed 40 Days for Life campaign
Inspiring and hope-filled reports of victories directly from local leaders on the front lines of this movement in key cities worldwide
How, going into the critical year of 2016, YOU can save more lives, help more abortion workers quit, and work toward ending abortion in the city where you live
Space for this one-time-only, live online event is limited, and the announcement about the webcast is going out to well over 100,000 people ...  so register now to claim your spot — it's 100% FREE:
Yesterday I invited you to attend a live video webcast that 40 Days for Life is presenting:
 
http://app.webinarjam.net/register/270/fa411857e5   
 
November 13 – Our Lady of Nanteuil (France) - Beatification of Charles de Foucauld (d.1910)
 
I strived to imitate the Virgin Mary 
 
About five and a half years ago, I told you... that I was striving to imitate the Blessed Virgin in the mystery of the Visitation, by silently carrying, like her, Jesus and the evangelical virtues, not to Saint Elizabeth’s home, but among the infidels, to sanctify those unfortunate children of God by the presence of the Holy Eucharist and by the example of living a life of Christian virtue...

Seven years ago this spring I wrote to you from Akbes about what I intended to do: imitate the Virgin Mary in the mystery of the Visitation, that is to say, to sanctify the infidels in mission countries by carrying Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament among them in silence, without preaching, and practicing the evangelical virtues.
 
Blessed Charles de Foucauld (d.1916), Hermit in the Sahara, Martyr
Excerpts from his letters to his spiritual director, Father Huvelin
 
 
The Blessed Virgin's Predestination (II) November 13 - Our Lady of Nanteuil (France, 1st Century.)

His science is one, simple and indivisible, but to adjust it to our intelligence we must first divide it into acts or instants, the more so that the created things that are its object are subordinated among themselves, follow each other in succession and are linked together.
The first instant is: after God communicated ad intra or within himself, he found it worthy of his goodness to communicate himself ad extra, i.e. outwardly, by sharing his divinity and perfections with creatures in whom he would find, besides, his delights. In the second instant he decreed to execute this communication for the external glory which he would derive from the manifestation of his greatness. In the third instant he determined the order in which this communication would occur, so that the most beautiful harmony would glimmer between all his creatures.
Excerpts from City of God or the Divine History and Life of the Virgin Mother of God (Part 1, chapter I) manifested to Mary of Agreda.
 
It Makes No Sense Not To Believe In GOD 
Every Christian must be a living book wherein one can read the teaching of the gospel
Friday   Saints of this Day November 13 Idus Novémbris  

St. Frances Xavier Cabrini, Virgin (Memorial).

November 13
St. Frances Xavier Cabrini, Virgin (Memorial)
  founded schools hospitals orphanages; Patron of immigrants
St. Frances Xavier Cabrini, Virgin St. Frances was born in Lombardi, Italy in 1850, one of thirteen children. At eighteen, she desired to become a Nun, but poor health stood in her way. She helped her parents until their death, and then worked on a farm with her brothers and sisters.

One day a priest asked her to teach in a girls' school and she stayed for six years. At the request of her Bishop, she founded the Missionary Sisters of the Sacred Heart to care for poor children in schools and hospitals. Then at the urging of Pope Leo XIII she came to the United States with six nuns in 1889 to work among the Italian immigrants.


The measure of charity may be taken from the want of desires.
As desires diminish in the soul, charity increases in it;
and when it no longer feels any desire, then it possesses perfect charity. St. Augustine

It is not particularly difficult to find thousands who will spend two or three hours a day in exercising, but if you ask them to bend their knees to God in five minutes of prayer, they protest that it is too long.
-- Bishop Fulton Sheen
November 13 – Our Lady of Nanteuil (France)
  In our hearth be Queen!
In our hearth be Queen!  this very old popular hymn is still sung every year on Pentecost Monday, during the Pilgrimage of Our Lady of Nanteuil, and again at the beginning of September, for the Pilgrimage of Saint Gilles of Aiguevives (Montrichard, France). 

Kings Louis XI and Louis XII (who married Joan of France in the Church of the Holy Cross of Montrichard) both had a special devotion to Our Lady of Nanteuil, as did the spouse of Napoleon III, Empress Eugenie, who was also a pilgrim to Our Lady of Nanteuil and made many donations to these two churches (liturgical ornaments, chalice, pieta, etc).  Father Gerard Gouineau Foreign Missions of Paris http://romaaeterna.jp/augustin/aug1013.htm

 
November 13 - Dedication of the Abbey Our Lady of Bec Hellouin (Normandy, France)
- Beatification of Charles de Foucault
It is Normal that Children ask their Mother
An enthusiastic prayer to the Blessed Virgin is never pushed away: Jesus makes a point of showing us today, as in Cana, that He loves his Mother, always answers her prayers and enjoys seeing her invoked and honored by us.
It is normal that children ask their mother; so let us ask the Blessed Virgin. It is not possible for us to be true brothers and sisters of Jesus, to imitate him and resemble him, if we are not true children of the Blessed Virgin.
Blessed Charles de Foucault Meditation on the Holy Scriptures #429
Coptic Ss John and James, Bishops of Persia Martyrdom of; would not turn from the faith, would not cease from teaching the people and strengthening them, in spite of their torture
Coptic Ss Epimachus and Adrianus (Azarianus); Martyrdom of; admonished Maximianus for worshipping man-made idols which could neither see nor hear and wherein dwelt Satan, who led men astray by worshipping these idols
    305 St. Valentine, Solutor & Victor MM (RM)
    314 St. Mitrius martyr Slave  honorable mention by Saint Gregory of Tours
    444 St. Brice raised by St. Martin of Tours at Marmoutier
    437 St. Arcadius and Companions Protomartyrs Vandal persecution
          St. Columba martyr England
   527 St. Quintian  Bishop Africa native
   548 St. Columba abbot disciple of St. Finian Ireland
   580 St. Dalmatius Bishop of Rodez
6th v. St. Devinicus Scottish missionary bishop
 657 Saint Eugenius of Toledo gifted poet musician most zealous for all that pertained to divine worship B (RM)
7th v. St. Gredifael Welsh or Breton abbot of Whitland
  670 St. Maxellendis Virgin martyr Caudry restored sight to her murderer

7th v. St. Chillien Irish; Bishop Saint Faro of Meaux sent him to preach Gospel in the Artois, met with success
7th v. St. Caillin bishop turned Druids into stone;  when they refused to embrace the Christian faith.
7th v. St. Gredifael Welsh or Breton abbot of Whitland; accompanied Saint Padarn from Brittany to Wales
  867 St. Nicholas I, Pope served Pope Sergius II deacon under Pope Leo IV trusted adviser to Pope Benedict III elected bishop of Rome still a deacon, and occupied the see with distinguished courage and energy for nine troubled years.(RM) patron of tailors cloth workers
1004 St. Abbo Monastic abbot; leader, papal representative calming effect of year 1000.
1199 Saint Homobonus of Cremona life of the utmost rectitude integrity known for his charity concern for poor devoted profits to relief some he looked after in his own house (RM)
1230 Nicholas Tavelic, Adeodatus Aribert, Stephen of Cueno & Peter of Siardus of Mariengaarden, O. Praem
1280 Blessed Mark of Scala, OSB Abbot (AC)
1463 St. Didacus several miracles restoring patients eremite kind gentle
1568 Stanislaus Kostka, SJ (RM); known for his studious ways, deep religious fervor, mortifications. After recovered from serious illness experienced several visions, he decided to join the Jesuits; experienced ecstasies at Mass.
1917 St. Frances Xavier Cabrini founded schools hospitals orphanages; Patron of immigrants; In 1946, Pope Pius XII named her patroness of all emigrants and immigrants.
Shrine of Our Lady of Nanteuil Nov 13 - OUR LADY OF NANTEUIL (France 1st C.)


This shrine is one of the oldest in France. The first chapel was built around an oak tree in which a statue of Our Lady had been found. A parish church, later built nearby, shows late 12th century architecture, but the original shrine was already very old at that time.

The religious upheavals in 16th - century France left Our Lady of Nanteuil undisturbed, but before the French Revolution, a change came over the statue. The smiling face became sad, and many pilgrims testified to seeing tears on the cheeks. The Revolution brought sorrow to the shrine.
One of the pilgrims threw a rope around the neck of the statue and pulled it to the ground, breaking all but the head. A woman who carelessly tossed the head aside and looked for better loot was punished by almost instant death. Another woman took up the mutilated head and hid it until the destruction was over and a new body could be made to go with it.
One of the many miracles recorded of Our Lady of Nanteuil is the cure of a little boy who was completely crippled.
His mother carried him on her back for three pilgrimages, and the third time he returned home entirely cured.
The shrine was famous for cures of sick children.
This shrine had a privileged altar, highly indulgenced.
It was a favorite of the Venerable Olier and of that saintly vagabond Benedict Joseph Labre.
Sister Manetta Lamberty, S.C.C. The Woman in Orbit, 1966.

“The saints must be honored as friends of Christ and children and heirs of God, as John the theologian and evangelist says: ‘But as many as received him, he gave them the power to be made the sons of God....’ Let us carefully observe the manner of life of all the apostles, martyrs, ascetics and just men who announced the coming of the Lord. And let us emulate their faith, charity, hope, zeal, life, patience under suffering, and perseverance unto death, so that we may also share their crowns of glory” Exposition of the Orthodox Faith

God calls each one of us to be a saint in order to get into heaven.
1917 St. Frances Xavier Cabrini founded schools hospitals orphanages; Patron of immigrants
       

Coptic Ss John and James, Bishops of Persia Martyrdom of; would not turn from the faith, and would not cease from teaching the people and strengthening them, in spite of their torture
On this day, Sts. John and James, Bishops of Persia, were martyred by the hands of Shapur, the son of Hormuzd (Hermez), King of Persia.  When the King demanded them to worship the sun and fire, and to offer sacrifices to them, they did not obey him. Instead, they continued teaching and confirming the people in the faith of the Lord Christ, to Whom is the glory. Therefore, the King ordered them be tortured severely. When they would not turn from the faith, and would not cease from teaching the people and strengthening them, in spite of their torture, he ordered them be cast into the fire. They gave up their souls into the hand of the Lord Christ, thus received the crown of glory with all the saints.
Their prayers be with us. Amen.
Coptic Ss Epimachus and Adrianus (Azarianus); Martyrdom of; admonished Maximianus for worshipping man-made idols which could neither see nor hear and wherein dwelt Satan, who led men astray by worshipping these idols
On this day also, Sts. Epimachus and Adrianus (Azarianus), who were from the city of Rome, were martyred. Some people accused them of being Christians to the Governor, who was appointed by Maximianus the Emperor.  He brought them and questioned them about their belief. They confessed that they were Christians. Then they reproved him for having forsaken the worship of God, who created the Heaven, the Earth, and all that is therein. They also admonished him for worshipping man-made idols which could neither see nor hear and wherein dwelt Satan, who led men astray by worshipping these idols. The Governor marvelled at their audacity and commanded their necks to be cut off. Thus they received the crown of martyrdom.
Their intercession be with us and Glory be to our God, forever. Amen.
297 Antoninus, Zebinas, Germanus & Ennatha MM (RM)
Cæsaréæ, in Palæstína, pássio sanctórum Antoníni, Zébinæ, Germáni et Ennathæ Vírginis.  Hæc, sub Galério Maximiáno Imperatóre, verbéribus cæsa, igne cremáta est; illi vero, cum intrépidi ac líbera voce Firmiliánum Præsidem, diis immolántem, impietátis argúerent, cápite cæsi sunt.
    At Caesarea in Palestine, the martyrdom of the Saints Antoninus, Zebina, Germanus, and the virgin Ennatha.  Under Galerius Maximian, Ennatha was scourged and burned alive, while the others, for boldly reproaching the governor Firmilian for his idolatry in sacrificing to the gods, were beheaded.
This quartet was martyred by Galerius, to whom they had dared to preach the Gospel. The virgin Ennatha was burned alive, while the others were beheaded (Benedictines, Encyclopedia).

305 Valentine, Solutor & Victor MM (RM)
Ravénnæ natális sanctórum Mártyrum Valentíni, Solutóris et Victóris; qui sub Diocletiáno Imperatóre passi sunt.
    At Ravenna, the birthday of the holy martyrs Valentine, Salutor, and Victor, who suffered under Emperor Diocletian.
Martyrs at Ravenna under Diocletian. Probably a duplicate of November 11. To both groups some martyrologies add a number of other names (Benedictines).
314 St. Mitrius martyr; Slave honorable mention by Saint Gregory of Tours
Aquis, in província Narbonénsi, beáti Mítrii, claríssimi Mártyris.
    At Aix, in the province of Narbonne, the renowned martyr, blessed Mitrius.
Beheaded by his master in Aix, Provence, France. He is also listed as Merre, Metre, and Mitre. Mitrius was abused by fellow slaves because of his Christian faith even before his martyrdom.

Mitrius of Aix M (RM) (also known as Mitre, Metre, Merre). Although no authentic acta of Saint Mitrius have survived to our time, the Greek slave of a tyrannical master at Aix-en-Provence is given honorable mention by Saint Gregory of Tours. He was savagely ill-used by his master and by his fellow-slaves, and finally beheaded during the reign of Diocletian (Benedictines, Husenbeth). In art he is shown as a layman carrying his head into Aix Cathedral. Sometimes he is portrayed giving grapes to a poor man. Saint Mitrius is venerated as the patron of Aix-en-Provence (Roeder).

437 St. Arcadius and Companions Protomartyrs Vandal persecution of the faith.
In Africa sanctórum Mártyrum Hispanórum Arcádii, Paschásii, Probi et Eutychiáni; qui, in persecutióne Wandálica, cum in Ariánam perfídiam nullátenus declináre pateréntur, hinc a Genseríco, Rege Ariáno, primum proscrípti, deínde acti in exsílium atque atrocíssimis supplíciis cruciáti, postrémum divérso mortis génere interémpti sunt.  Tunc et Paulílli puéruli, germáni sanctórum Paschásii et Eutychiáni, constántia enítuit; qui, cum de fide cathólica nullátenus posset avélli, fústibus diu cæsus est, atque ad ínfimam servitútem damnátus.
    In Africa, the holy martyrs Arcadius, Paschasius, Probus, and Eutychian, Spaniards who absolutely refused to yield to the Arian perfidy, during the persecution of the Vandals.  Accordingly, they were condemned by the Arian king Genseric, driven into exile, and finally, after being subjected to fearful tortures, were put to death in divers manners.  At that time there was also seen the constancy of the small boy Paulillus, brother of the Saints Paschasius and Eutychian.  Because he could not be turned from the Catholic faith, he was long beaten with rods and sentenced to the lowest servitude.
They were Spaniards, exiled to Africa by Geiseric, the Vandal king, who professed the Arian heresy. Paulillus and Paschasius were young boys, brothers of Eutychian. Arcadius was a married man, and Probus a believer in the faith. Paulillus was beaten until he died. The others were tortured and executed.

437 Arcadius, Paschasius, Probus, Eutychian & Paulillus MM (RM)
All of these martyrs were Spaniards, who were exiled by the Vandal Arian King Genseric to Africa, where they became the protomartyrs of the Vandal persecution. Paulillus was only a boy, the little brother of Paschasius and Eutychian. "As he could not be turned from the Catholic faith he was long beaten with rods, and condemned to the basest servitude" (Benedictines).

437 SS. ARCADIUS AND HIS COMPANIONS, MARTYRS
“IN Africa”, says the Roman Martyrology, “the passion of the holy Spanish martyrs Arcadius, Paschasius, Probus and Eutychian who, in the Vandal persecution, when they absolutely refused to enter into the Arian perfidy, were first proscribed by the Arian king, Genseric, then exiled and treated with atrocious cruelty, and finally slain in various ways. At that time, too, was seen the constancy of Paulillus, the little brother of SS. Paschasius and Eutychian, who, since he could in no way be turned from the Catholic faith, was long beaten with sticks and con­demned to the lowest slavery.” The boy afterwards died of exposure. In a letter to St Arcadius in captivity, Antoninus Honoratus, Bishop of Constantine, calls him the “standard—bearer of the faith”, and we learn from it—if indeed it was addressed to this Arcadius—the martyr was married and had a family.

There seems to be no independent passio of this group of martyrs, but there is a summary account in the Chronicle of Prosper of Aquitaine. The letter of Bishop Antoninus Honoratus is printed in Migne, PL., vol. I, cc. 567—570. 

444 Saint Brice of Tours B (RM)
Turónis, in Gállia, sancti Brítii Epíscopi, qui fuit discípulus beáti Martíni Epíscopi.
    At Tours in France, St. Brice, bishop, a disciple of the blessed Bishop Martin. (also known as Brictio, Britius, Brixius)
444 ST BRICE, BISHOP OF TOURS
Brice (Britius, Brictio) was brought up by St Martin of Tours at Marmoutier but for long was no credit to his master. He was badly behaved, and contemptuous towards St Martin, who refrained from degrading and dismissing Brice, only lest he should thereby be avoiding a trial sent from God. Moreover, if the story be true, he had already foreseen that the troublesome cleric would be his successor. For while Brice was yet a deacon he had characterized his master as crazy; and when St Martin asked why he thought he was mad, denied his words. But St Martin replied that he had heard them. “Nevertheless”, he said, “I have prayed for you and you shall be bishop of Tours. But you will suffer many adversities in your office.” And Brice went away grumbling that he had always said the bishop was a fool. In one of the dialogues of Sulpicius Severus, Brice is represented as holding himself up as a model because he had been brought up at Marmoutier, while St Martin had been bred in camps and was falling into superstition and folly in his old age. Then suddenly he threw himself at St Martin’s feet and begged his pardon and Martin, whose pardon it was never difficult to get, forgave him, saying, “If Christ could tolerate Judas, surely I can put up with Brice”.

St Martin died in 397 and Brice was in fact elected to his place. He did not give satisfaction as a bishop and several unsuccessful attempts were made to get him condemned, until in the thirty-third year of his episcopate a happening was alleged with a woman. St Gregory of Tours asserts that Brice cleared himself by a very astonishing miracle, but he was driven from his see and went to Rome to protest his innocence. He remained in exile for seven years, during which he became a reformed character, and when Armentius, who had administered Tours in his place, died, he returned to his see. Brice lived to govern it for some years and by his exemplary life made such amends for his past that when he died he was venerated as a saint, considerable evangelical activity being attributed to him.

Within twenty-five years of his death the feast of St Brice was kept at Tours with a vigil, and his cultus soon spread. He was very popular in England (the Anglican calendar still retains his name), but nowadays he is only associated with the Massacre of St Brice’s Day in 1002, when Ethelred the Redeless ordered the wholesale murder of Danes which provoked Sweyn’s invasion of this country. 

What we know of St Brice is almost entirely derived from Sulpicius Severus’s writings on St Martin and from the popular traditions retailed by St Gregory of Tours. There is, no doubt, much that is perplexing in the story of St Brice, but the matter should be considered in the light of what two specialists have written on the subject see Poncelet in the Analecta Bollandiana, vol. xxx (1911), pp. 88—89, and Delehaye in the same vol. xxxviii (1920), pp. 5—136, especially pp. 105 and 135. The letters of Pope Zosimus will be found summarized in Jaffé-Kaltenbrunner, Regesta Pontificum, nn. 330—331, and the full text in Migne, FL., vol. xx, cc. 650 and 663. In the second of these he expressly declares that Lazarus, the accuser of Brice, was “pro calumniatore damnatus, cum Bricii innocentis episcopi vitam falsis objectionibus appetisset”. It was probably his close connection with St Martin which made St Brice a popular saint both in England and in Italy; in nearly every one of the early English calendars printed by F. Wormald for the Henry Bradshaw Society his name is entered under November 13.  

God loves variety. He doesn't mass-produce his saints. Every saint is unique, for each is the result of a new idea. As the liturgy says: Non est inventus similis illis--there are no two exactly alike. It is we with our lack of imagination, who paint the same haloes on all the saints.  God loves variety. And He has a remarkable sense of humor. Sometimes He seemingly takes mischievous pleasure in placing side by side two saints whose characters should make it impossible for them to get along together. No doubt God wants to teach them humility, by showing them that each represents only a small part of the mystery of saintliness; and perhaps God also wants to reassure us, by telling us that if there are many mansions in heaven, there are also many roads leading there.  And so it was in the 4th century in Touraine, France. God set the impeccable Saint Martin of Tours side- by-side with the insufferable Saint Brice. Unlike his master, Brice was a proud, ambitious, and, perhaps, even licentious cleric.

When still very young, Brice entered the monastery that Martin had founded at Marmoûtier, just outside Tours. At first he was just an ordinary, boisterous young monk, but soon he grew up. By the time he was 18, he had become a deacon and had his own stables and slaves.  Martin, whose enemies reproached him for his excessive poverty and for what Gaston Boissier has called his 'rather democratic' outlook, was worried about the way the young deacon was behaving and remonstrated him like a father.
Brice bristled and answered the bishop with biting sarcasm. How could a barbarian from the wilds of Hungary tell him, who had been born on the banks of the Loire, how to behave? Was he, who had been educated properly, to take instruction from an improperly educated old legionary? Anyone who has ever dealt with teenagers can imagine the encounter.
Unlike most adults, however, Martin listened calmly and replied gently. He even predicted that Brice would one day become bishop, but that his episcopate would not be a peaceful one. The vicars- general and the canons of Tours, who didn't relish the idea of one day being ruled by this spitfire, urged Martin to send him packing. But Martin replied, "If Christ put up with Judas, then surely I can put up with Brice."
Brice continued to hold Martin in contempt, but despite Brice's attitude Martin dealt patiently with him, and eventually Brice repented with great remorse and begged Martin's forgiveness.

When Martin died, Brice succeeded him in 397 as bishop of Tours-- not by tricks or intrigue but by the regular open vote of the people. For 30 years Brice taught, baptized, confirmed, administered, and fulfilled all his duties as bishop. Several times Brice was accused of laxness but nothing really extraordinary happened, none of those miracles or scandals that were as dear to the hearts of the chroniclers then as they are to journalists today.  Nevertheless, Brice slept badly; he couldn't forget that Martin had predicted that he would be put to the test, and with a man like Martin there wasn't the slightest hope that the prediction would prove false. It might be late coming, but come it would. And every day for 30 years Brice waited for the fulfillment of the prophecy. It was uncomfortable but God had chosen it as a way of deflating the excessive conceit of youth.

Then it happened. One morning the rumor ran through the streets of Tours that a seamstress belonging to the bishop's palace had borne him a son. What a windfall for the town's gossips!  The accusation was false, but how to prove it? Since blood tests for paternity hadn't been discovered, Brice had to find another way. He had the infant brought to him, and, in his most episcopal voice, said, "I admonish you in the name of Jesus Christ to say, in the presence of everybody, if I am the man who fathered you." To which the baby replied, "You are not my father."

Such precociousness seemed suspicious to those present, and they thought that there must be some trick (unless it is we who have been tricked by Saint Gregory of Tours, who recorded the story). At any rate Brice's people were so far from being convinced that they expelled their bishop by physical force.  Brice didn't resist, for he realized that Martin's prophecy was now being fulfilled. About 430, he used his free time to make a journey ad limina, which took him seven years. During his 'exile' Brice had an opportunity to repent of his ways and completely changed his lifestyle. On his way back home he founded several new Christian centers.  When the seven years had passed, Brice returned to Tours. Just as he was coming into sight of the town, a providential fever killed the bishop who had been elected his successor. Not wanting to be lacking in politeness, Brice quickened his step and arrived in time to perform the funeral rites for this most tactful of bishops. He then resumed the episcopate himself for the remaining years of his life and ruled with humility, holiness, and ability.

At his death he was held to be a saint, and rightly so, such was the change of his manners after his conversion in Rome. He was buried in the same church as Saint Martin, for now that they were both saints there was no reason why they shouldn't sleep side-by- side. God had destined them to be together and to serve as foundations for the church of Tours. By joining the serenity of Martin to the vigor of Brice, harmony was ensured for a town where the Loire and Vouvray meet (Attwater, Benedictines, Delaney, Encyclopedia).

In art Saint Brice carries hot coals in his vestments. Sometimes he is pictured as (1) carrying fire in his hand; (2) with a child in his arms or near him; or (3) with Saint Martin of Tours (because he was a disciple of Saint Martin) (Roeder).

Dear Lord, grant us a spirit that is not bound by our own ideas and preferences. Grant that we may be able to appreciate in others what we lack in ourselves. O Lord, grant that we may understand that every saint must be a unique praise of Your glory.

 St. Brice raised by St. Martin of Tours at Marmoutier
and also known as Britius. He became a vain, overly ambitious cleric, holding Martin in great contempt. Despite Brice's attitude, Martin was most patient with him, and in time, in great remorse, he asked Martin's forgiveness for his attitude toward him. He succeeded Martin as Bishop of Tours in 397 but reverted to his old ways, neglected his duties, was several times accused of lackness and immorality. Though cleared of the latter charge, he was exiled from his See. He went to Rome and in the seven years of his exile there, repented and completely changed his life style. When the administrator of his See, in his absence died, he returned and ruled with such humility, holiness, and ability, he was venerated as a saint by the time of his death.
6th v. St. Devinicus Scottish missionary bishop also called Denick or Teavneck.
He was a companion of Sts. Columba and Machar in evangelizing Caithness. Other details of his life no longer exist.
Devinicus of Caithness B (AC) (also known as Denick, Teavneck)  6th century. In his old age this native of northern Scotland associated himself with the missionary work of Saints Columba and Machar and evangelized Caithness. He is reputed to have been a bishop (Benedictines).

527 St. Quintian  Bishop Africa native
 Arvérnis, in Gállia, sancti Quinctiáni Epíscopi.     In Auvergne in France, St. Quinctian, bishop.
He was forced to leave his homeland during the invasion of Africa by the Arian Vandals. These Arians began a persecution of orthodox Christians. Settling in Gaul, he served the Church and was eventually appointed bishop of Clermont as successor to St. Euphrasius.
Quintain of Rodez B (RM). An African by birth, he fled to Gaul to escape the Arian-Vandal persecution. Eventually he became bishop of Rodez, but was driven thence, this time by Arian Visigoths, and went to Auvergne, where Saint Euphrasius made him successor in the see of Clermont (Benedictines).

548 St. Columba abbot disciple of St. Finian Ireland
He ruled the monastery of Tydaglas in Munster, Ireland.
580 St. Dalmatius Bishop of Rodez
France, ruling from 524 until his death. King Amalaric, the Visigoth ruler who embraced the heresy of Arianisni, persecuted Dalmatius because of his orthodoxy.
Dalmatius of Rodez B (AC). Bishop Dalmatius of Rodez, France, (524-580) suffered much at the hands of the Arian Visigoth King Amalric (Benedictines).

St. Columba martyr England
The patroness of two parished in Cornwall, England. The heather king there put her to death. Columba of Cornwall VM (AC)
Columba, the patron saint of two parishes in Cornwall, is said to have been a Christian maiden put to death by a heathen king of Cornwall (Benedictines).

657 Saint Eugenius of Toledo gifted poet musician most zealous for all that pertained to divine worship B (RM).
Toléti, in Hispánia, sancti Eugénii Epíscopi.    At Toledo in Spain, St. Eugene, bishop.
Eódem die natális sancti Eugénii, Epíscopi Toletáni et Mártyris; qui fuit beáti Dionysii Areopagítæ discípulus, et in território Parisiénsi, consummáto martyrii cursu, beátæ passiónis corónam percépit a Dómino.  Ipsíus autem corpus Tolétum, in Hispánia, póstea fuit translátum.
Also, the birthday of St. Eugene, bishop of Toledo and martyr, disciple of blessed Denis the Areopagite.  His martyrdom was completed near Paris, and he received from our Lord a crown for his blessed sufferings. 
His body was afterwards translated to Toledo in Spain.
(also known as Eugene II) Born in Toledo, Spain. Eugenius, a Spanish Goth, was successively a cleric under Saint Helladius, a monk of Saint Engracia at Saragossa, and then the archdeacon of Saint Braulio in Toledo. Finally, in 646, he was raised to the primatial see of Toledo. He was a gifted poet and musician, and most zealous for all that pertained to divine worship (Benedictines).
657 ST EUGENIUS, ARCHBISHOP OF Toledo
IT is said there was an Eugenius who occupied the see of Toledo and was an astronomer and mathematician his successor, St Eugenius, was a musician and poet. He was a Spanish Goth, a monk at Saragossa, and to avoid ecclesiastical promotion he hid himself in a cemetery. But he was forced to return and receive episcopal consecration. Some of the writings of St Eugenius, in prose and in verse, are extant; and we are told that he was a good musician, who tried to improve the poor singing of which he heard so much. He governed his see with great edification, and was followed therein by his nephew, St Ildephonsus. Alban Butler refers to another St EUGENIUS, called “of Toledo”, who is mentioned in the Roman Martyrology on November 15. He is said to have been a martyred associate of St Dionysius of Paris, but he had nothing to do with Spain. The martyrology also names, on the 17th, a third ST EUGENIUS, deacon to St Zenobius of Florence and a disciple of St Ambrose. 
There has been confusion in the early episcopal lists of Toledo, and the existence of Eugenius I is questionable. The story printed in the Analecta Bollandiana, vol. ii, is probably a myth. But there can be no question about the real existence and the literary activities of the Eugenius who died in 657. St Ildephonsus gives a short account of him in his De viris illustribus, cap. xiv (Migne, PL., vol. xcvi, c. 204). His poetical writings, with notes, etc., have been edited in MGH., Auctores Antiquissimi, vol. xiv. See on this the Analecta Bollandiana, vol. xxiv (1905), pp. 297—298. See also J. Madoz in Revue d’histoire ecclésiastique, vol. xxxv (1939), pp. 530—533.
7th v. St. Chillien Irish; Bishop Saint Faro of Meaux sent him to preach Gospel in the Artois, met with success
7th v. ST KILIAN
THIS Kilian (Chilianus), a native of Ireland, was said to be related to St Fiacre whom, returning from a pilgrimage to Rome, he visited at his hermitage in Brie, staying some time with him there. St Aubert having asked for some missionaries for Artois, St Faro of Meaux induced St Kilian to leave his solitude and undertake the work. It is related that, coming to the house of a nobleman near the banks of the Aisne, the weary traveller asked for something to drink, and was told by the mistress of the house that the river was just behind him, whereat he could quench his thirst at his leisure she had nothing for him to drink. “May it be to you as you have said”, replied Kilian, and walked off. When the nobleman came home from hunting, he also called for a drink, and was annoyed to find that all his barrels, full in the morning, were now empty. There was a hue and cry for Kilian, and when he was found profuse apologies were made to him, and the barrels were found again to be full. This nobleman had another house at Aubigny, and here St Kilian eventually made his headquarters, building a church on a piece of land given him near the Scarpe and preaching the gospel zealously throughout Artois until the day of his death.

There is a Latin life of late date, which was printed for the first time in the Analecta Bollandiana, vol. xx (1901), pp. 431—444. It has since been edited by B. Krusch in MGH., Scriptores Merov., vol. v. On this Kenney (Sources, vol. i, pp. 494—495) remarks “the extant life contains much that is absurd” but Hildegaire (c. 889) speaks of a Life of Kilian in his possession, so that it is possible there may have been some foundation in authentic materials. See also A. Perret, Histoire de S. Kilien d’Aubigny (1920), and L. Gougaud, Les Saints irlandais hors d’Irlande (1936).  

Relative of St. Fiacre. Chillien worked in Artois, France, to spread the faith. He is buried in Aubigny. Kilian of Aubigny (RM)(also known as Chillianus, Chillien, Chillen)
Born in Ireland; 7th century. Saint Kilian, kinsman of Saint Fiacre, became a missionary in France almost by accident. On his return from a pilgrimage to Rome, Kilian stopped to visit Fiacre in his solitude in Brie. There he joined his near relative in his contemplation and evangelizing efforts. Then Bishop Saint Faro of Meaux sent him out to preach the Gospel on his own in the Artois, where he met with success. His body was enshrined at Aubigny, near Arras, in the monastery church he established, where he is the object of great veneration. Styled a bishop in Colgan's manuscript, Kilian is said to have been the only Irishman to have been offered the papacy--which he declined (Benedictines, Husenbeth, Montague).

7th v. St. Gredifael Welsh or Breton abbot of Whitland; accompanied Saint Padarn from Brittany to Wales
in Dyfed, Wales. He accompanied St. Paternus from Brittany to Wales.
Gredifael of Wales (AC)
7th century. A Breton or Welsh saint who accompanied Saint Padarn from Brittany to Wales. He is said to have been abbot of Whitland in Pembrokeshire (Benedictines).

7th v. St. Caillin bishop turned Druids into stone;  when they refused to embrace the Christian faith.
associated with St. Aidan of Ferns, Ireland. Legends claim that Caillin turned Druids into stone when they refused to embrace the Christian faith.
Caillin of Ferns B (AC) 7th century. Caillin is associated with Saint Aidan (Maidhoc) of Ferns. It is said that Caillin turned certain unbelieving Druids into stones (Benedictines, Montague).

670 St. Maxellendis Virgin martyr Caudry restored sight to her murderer.
670 St Maxellendis, Virgin And Martyr
The diocese of Cambrai observes today the feast of St Maxellendis, the maiden daughter of the noble Humolin and Ameltrudis of the town of Caudry. Many young men, among whom her parents favoured a certain Harduin of Solesmes, sought her hand in marriage but Maxellendis said she did not wish to be married. When her father pointed out that God could be served well in the married state and that many saints had been wives as well, she asked for time to think it over. During the night she dreamed that an angel confirmed her resolution, and the next day she told Humolin that she was quite determined to take no other bridegroom but Christ. But her parents were equally determined that she should be the bride of Harduin, and when preparations for the wedding were going forward Maxellendis fled from the house. She took refuge with her nurse near Cateau­-Cambrésis, but her hiding-place was discovered and Harduin and his friends broke into the house. Maxellendis could not be seen anywhere, but in ransacking the place a large clothes-chest was thrown open, and the girl found therein. Disre­garding her cries and struggles they carried her off, but she broke loose and tried to run away, so that Harduin in his anger drew his sword and struck her with such force that she was killed on the spot. The men ran away in horror, all except Harduin himself, who was seized with blindness. St Maxellendis was buried in a neighbouring church, where she was the occasion of many marvels, so that St Vindician, Bishop of Cambrai, about the year 673 translated her body solemnly to Caudry. On this occasion the repentant Harduin asked to be led out to meet the procession. When he was brought near the coffin he fell on his knees, loudly accusing himself of his crime and asking God for pardon: and at once his sight was restored.

She was the daughter of Humolin and Ameltrudis, and she fled a proposed marriage with Harduin of Solesmes. Maxellendis wanted to become a nun, and when she was discovered by Harduin and his escort, she fought to escape him. Harduin killed Maxellendis with his sword and was struck blind. His sight was restored when he knelt for forgiveness beside Maxellendis’ coffin when her remains were retumed to Caudry in 673.
177—187.
670 Saint Maxellendis of Caudry VM (AC)
Saint Maxellendis was stabbed to death at Caudry, near Cambrai, by Lord Hardouin of Solesmes, to whom she was betrothed by her parents. Having paid the bride-price then traditional, he killed her in a fit of rage when she told him she wanted to be a nun (Benedictines, Encyclopedia).
The passio of the saint has been printed in Ghesquière, Acta Sanctorum Belgii, vol. iii, pp. 580—589. The details are quite untrustworthy, but there were translations of her relics and an active cultus, especially at Cambrai where the greater part were eventually enshrined. See C. J. Destombes, Vies des Saints de Cambrai et Arras (1887), vol. iv, pp. 177-187
867 Nicholas I, Pope served Pope Sergius II deacon under Pope Leo IV trusted adviser to Pope Benedict III elected bishop of Rome still a deacon, and occupied the see with distinguished courage and energy for nine troubled years. (RM)
Romæ sancti Nicolái Papæ Primi, vigóre apostólico præstántis.
    At Rome, Pope St. Nicholas, distinguished for the apostolic spirit.
867 St Nicholas I, Pope
When Nicholas I died on this day in the year 867 after a pontificate of nine years all men of goodwill bewailed his loss, and heavy rains at that time were looked on by the Romans as testimony to the grief of the very heavens, for the dead pope had well deserved the titles “Saint” and “the Great” which succeeding ages bestowed on him.

 “Since the time of Blessed Gregory [the Great]”, writes a contemporary, “no one comparable with him has been raised to the papal dignity. He gave orders to kings and rulers as though he were lord of the world. To good bishops and priests, to religious lay-people, he was kind and gentle and modest; to evil­doers he was terrible and stern. It is rightly said that in him God raised up a second Elias”, and the greatest pope between Gregory I and Hildebrand.

He was a scion of a good Roman house, and Sergius II attached him to the papal household. St Leo IV and Benedict III used his talents, and on the death of the last-named in 858 Nicholas, then a deacon, was elected to the supreme pontificate. The new pope was at once confronted with the troubled state of affairs in the second see of Christendom, Constantinople. It has been related in the notice of St Ignatius, Patriarch of Constantinople (October 23), how that Bardas Caesar and the Emperor Michael III removed hierarch from his see, and Photius put in his place.

Other important matters were soon involved, and St Nicholas was engaged in very difficult and delicate relations with Constan­tinople throughout his pontificate. During the course of them he received a letter from the newly baptized ruler of the Bulgars, Boris, asking a number of questions Nicholas’s reply was “a masterpiece of pastoral wisdom and one of the finest documents of the history of the papacy”. It also reproved Boris for his cruelty to pagans, forbidding their “conversion” by force, and told the Bulgars to be less superstitious, less ferocious in war, and not to use torture. Naturally St Nicholas wished these new Christians to belong to his Patriarchate, but Boris eventually submitted his people to Constantinople.

 
St Nicholas I stands out as a firm defender of the integrity of marriage, of the weak and oppressed, and of the equality of all before the divine law. He had to uphold the matrimonial sacrament not only against King Lothair of Lorraine but also against the complaisant bishops who had approved his divorce and remarriage and when Charles the Bald of Burgundy obtained from the Frankish bishops the excommunication of his daughter Judith for having married Baldwin of Flanders without her father’s consent, Nicholas intervened in favour of freedom of marriage, recommending less severity and urging Hincmar of Rheims to try and reconcile Charles with his daughter.*{* The lady was a widow, having been the wife of Ethelwulf of Wessex and also united to her stepson Ethelbald. From her marriage with Baldwin was descended Matilda, the wife of William the Conqueror.}

This Hincmar was a prominent figure among early medieval bishops, but he was proud and ambitious, and Nicholas, like other popes, had to force him to acknowledge the right of the Holy See to take cognizance of all important causes, one of Hincmar’s suffragans having appealed to Rome against the sentence of his metropolitan. St Nicholas also twice excommunicated Archbishop John of Ravenna, for his intolerance towards his suffragans and other clergy and open defiance of the pope. People turned to this strong and just judge from all over Europe and beyond.
The Church in the West was in a bad way at the time when St Nicholas was called to govern it after the collapse of Charlemagne’s empire. Young, inexperi­enced and even vicious bishops received and lost sees at the will of secular nobles. Excommunication was used (and for long after) as a daily weapon in the most unsuitable circumstances. Contempt for the persons of the clergy led to disrespect for their office; evil living had followed on the degeneration and disuse of canonical penance. The great pope did his utmost against thronging ills during a short reign: injustice and wickedness he denounced unsparingly, whether in high or low, clergy or laity. Certainly he did not lack ambition, but it was the ambition to consolidate for the Apostolic See a position in which the maximum amount of good could be done for souls. +{+He has been accused of deliberately making use of those documents known as the False Decretals, knowing them to be false. Whatever limited use he may have made of them he certainly did not know they were forged: nobody did before the fifteenth century. They were brought into Italy from France.}

“If, wrote the Anglican Dean Milman, “he treated the royal dignity of France with contempt, it had already become contempt­ible in the eyes of mankind; if he annulled by his own authority the decree of a national council, composed of the most distinguished prelates of Gaul, that council had already been condemned by all who had natural sympathies with justice and with innocence.” When any scandal or disorder arose, “he gave no rest to his frame or repose to his limbs “till he had tried to remedy it.”

Though his responsibilities were conterminous with Christendom, Nicholas had a deep personal solicitude for his own episcopal flock. For example, he had drawn up a list of all the disabled poor in Rome, who were fed daily in their homes, while the able-bodied were given food at the papal residence. Each person on the register had a particular day of the week on which to fetch it, and was provided with a sort of tally to remind him which was his day. St Nicholas was worn down by ill health, as well as by his own ceaseless energy. “Our heavenly Father”, he wrote, “has seen good to send me such pain that not only am I unable to write proper replies to your questions, but I cannot even dictate them, so intensely do I suffer,” He died at Rome on November 13, 867.   Pope St Nicholas the Great, whose feast is kept each year by the Romans, “was patient and temperate, humble and chaste, beautiful in face and graceful in body. His speech was learned and modest, illustrious though he was by great deeds. He was devoted to penance and the Holy Mysteries, the friend of widows and orphans, and the champion of all the people”. (Liber Pontificalis). Yet whilst he lay dying he was robbed by one of his officials of money that he had set aside for the poor.   St Nicholas I belongs to general church history and there is nothing which can be regarded as an early hagiographical life of this great pope, The account in the Liber, Pontificalis (see Duchesne’s edition, vol. ii, pp. 151—172) is somewhat less of an inventory than other preceding notices and is probably due to Anastasius the Librarian himself. A very good biography is provided in Mann, Lives of the Popes, vol. iii (1906), pp. 1148, and in the little volume of Jules Roy, St Nicholas I (Eng. trans., 1901) both these furnish a full list of sources and works to be consulted. But since they wrote additions have been made. The important correspondence of Pope Nicholas is accessible not only in Migne, PL., vol. cxix, but in MGH., Epistolae, vol. vi, on which see E. Perels in the Neues Archiv, vol. xxxvii (1912) and vol. xxxix (1914), as well as the book of the same scholar, Papst Nicolaus I und Anastasius Bibliothecarius (1920). See also Duchesne, Les Premiers Temps de l’État pontifical (1911) ; F. Dvornik, Les Slaves, Byzance et Rome au IXeme siècle (1926), and The Photian Schism (1948); F. X. Seppelt, Das Papsttum im Früh-Mittelalter (1934), pp. 241—284. On the question of the Forged Decretals, see especially P. Fournier and G. Le Bras, Histoire des Collections caroniques en Occident, vol. (1931), pp. 127—233, and J. Hailer, Nikolaus 1 und Pseudo-Isidor (1936).  Born in Rome between 819-822; died there in 867. Born into a distinguished Roman family, Nicholas served in the Curia under Pope Sergius II, became a deacon under Pope Leo IV, and was a trusted adviser to Pope Benedict III. Nicholas was elected bishop of Rome on April 22, 858, while still a deacon, and occupied the see with distinguished courage and energy for nine troubled years.
Among the matters with which he had to deal was the long dispute about the patriarchal see of Constantinople, the turbulence of Archbishop John of Ravenna and the ambition of Hincmar of Rheims, in addition to the matrimonial troubles of several important persons. He insisted on the sanctity and indissolubility of marriage, despite the threat of the invasion of Rome, when he denounced the bigamous marriage of the emperor's nephew, King Lothair II of Lorraine. This precipitated a struggle during which Nicholas deposed two German archbishops and Lothair's army threatened Rome.
He also insisted on the freedom to marry when he forced King Charles the Bald of Burgundy to accept the marriage of his daughter Judith to Baldwin of Flanders without the king's consent and compelled the Frankish bishops to withdraw the excommunication they had imposed on her for marrying without her father's consent.
In 861 Nicholas compelled Archbishop Hincmar of Rheims to accept papal appellate jurisdiction in important cases when he obliged Hincmar to restore Bishop Rothad of Soissons, whom he had deposed.
Twice he excommunicated recalcitrant and powerful Archbishop John of Ravenna, who counted on imperial support, for infringing on the rights of the Holy See and for abuses of his office, and made him submit to papal authority.
Nicholas was also involved in controversy with Constantinople throughout his pontificate over the illegal deposition of Ignatius and the appointment of Photius as patriarch of Constantinople by Emperor Michael III. Nicholas excommunicated Michael in 863; the matter was not finally resolved until newly crowned Emperor Basil I expelled Photius, who had declared the pope deposed, on the day Nicholas died.
Faced by disorder or scandal, Nicholas could not rest until he had dealt with it; but he sometimes invoked the aid of persons considerably less moderate and reasonable than himself.
He encouraged missionary activities, sending Saint Anskar as papal missionary to Scandinavia and bringing about the conversion of Bulgaria with missionaries he sent there. A letter (Responsa Nicolai ad consulta Bulgarum) he sent to the newly baptized Khan Boris of the Bulgars has been characterized as 'a masterpiece of pastoral wisdom and one of the finest documents of the history of the papacy.' The letter summarizes Christian faith and discipline.
A champion of papal primacy and the ascendancy of the Church over emperors, kings, and other secular authorities in matters concerning the Church, he was responsible for restoring the papacy to the highest prestige.
Nicholas's generosity made him beloved by the people and his defense of justice and virtue earned the respect of his contemporaries generally. He was famous for the reforms he instituted among the clergy and laity, was a patron of the arts and learning, and was a man of the highest personal integrity. Saint Nicholas is one of the three popes to whom the epithet 'the Great' is given (Saint Leo I and Saint Gregory I being the other two) (Attwater, Benedictines, Delaney).
1004 St. Abbo Monastic abbot; leader, papal representative calming effect of year 1000.
sometimes called Abbo of Fleury and Abbon.
1004 St Abbo Of Fleury, Abbot
Abbo Of Fleur was a monk among the most conspicuous for learning in his time and one, moreover, associated for a short period with our own country. About the year 971 St Oswald of York, then bishop of Worcester, founded a monastery at Ramsey in Huntingdonshire. Oswald had received the Benedictine habit at Fleury-sur-Loire, and about 986 he received from that monastery the services of Abbo as director of the school at Ramsey.

   He filled this office for two years, having himself studied in the schools of Paris, Rheims and Orleans, and then returned to Fleury to resume his own studies in philosophy, mathematics and astronomy. He was not allowed to pursue these in quietness, for on the death of the governing abbot he was elected to take his place. But the election was disputed, and a contest ensued which spread far beyond the walls of the monastery. It was eventually decided in favour of Abbo, with the help of Gerbert, who a few years later was to become pope as Silvester II.

Abbo’s career as a prelate was very lively, for he threw himself into the affairs of his time with great energy: he strove for the exemption of monasteries from episcopal control he made himself conspicuous at synods, and failed to get King Robert II’s very irregular second marriage recognized at Rome. He is perhaps better remembered for his writings, notably a collection of canons and, in England, his Life of St Edmund, king and martyr.

We learn from Abbo’s letters that he was much in request for restoring peace in disturbed monastic communities, and it was his zeal for discipline that brought about his violent death, for which he was venerated as a martyr. In 1004 he set out to restore order in the monastery at La Réole in Gascony. A brawl broke out between some monks and their servants, and Abbo in trying to pacify them was stabbed. He staggered to his cell, and there died in the arms of one of his monks. A feast of St Abbo is kept in one or two French dioceses, but it has been questioned whether this recognition is altogether appropriate on the evidence available.There is a reliable life of Abbo by his contemporary Aimoin. This and the circular letter, sent round to announce the tragedy of his death and to ask prayers for his soul, are printed in Mabillon, vol. vi, pt i, pp. 32—52. Some of Abbo’s writings and a collection of his letters will be found in Migne, PL., vol. cxxxix, but no complete edition of his works exists. His interest in mathematics and science has attracted attention, see, e.g. M. Cantor, Vorlesungen über d. Geschichte der Mathematik (1907), vol. i, pp. 845—847. Abbo, despite statements to the contrary, had no connection with the forged Decretals see Sackur, Die Cluniacenser, vol. I, pp. 270—299 and cf the work of Fournier and La Bras mentioned in the preceding note. Dom P. Cousin published S. Abbon de Fleury, un savant, un pasteur, un martyr, in 1954.
He was born in the region of Orléans, France, circa 945, and entered the Benedictine order at Fleury-sur-Loire after studying at Orléans, Paris, and Remis. St. Oswald of Worcester, England, brought Abbo to Ramsey, Huntingdonshrine, England, in 986. Abbo worked with Oswald but was elected abbot of Fleury in 988. This election was contested by a monk with the patronage of the bishop of Orléans and with royal favor. Gerbert, who became Pope Sylvester II in 999, had to resolve the issue, deciding on Abbo. As abbot of Fleury, Abbo attended the Synod of Basel and assisted Pope Gregory V, who had been expelled by the antipope John XVI. Abbo was also instrumental in calming thousands who believed the world would come to a catastrophic end at the start of the year 1000. Monastic affairs were also in turmoil in that era. In 1004, Abbo tried to reform the monastery of La Reole, in Gascony, France. He was caught in a severe confrontation between competing groups and was stabbed. He died as a result of his wound on November 13. Abbo was noted as a philosopher and scholar, especially in the fields of astronomy and mathematics, and wrote a life of St. Edmund.
1004 Abbo of Fleury OSB, Abbot M (AC)
Born near Orléans, France, c. 945; Saint Abbo studied in Paris, Rheims, and Orléans. Finally, he settled at the monastery of Fleury-sur-Loire (Saint-Benoît-sur- Loire). In about 986, Saint Oswald of Worcester invited him to became director of the monastery school in Ramsey, Huntingdonshire, England. Two years later Abbo returned to Fleury to resume his studies.

In 988, Abbo was elected abbot of Fleury, where he introduced the Cluniac observance; however, the election was disputed. The results were not finally accepted until quite some time later through the help of Gerbert, who later became Pope Sylvester II in 999.
  Abbo fought for monastic independence of bishops, was mediator between the pope and the king of France, and was active in settling disputes in various monasteries. He was murdered while attempting to settle a dispute among the monks at La Réole in Gascony. Abbo was widely known as a scholar in astronomy, mathematics, and philosophy, wrote a Life of Saint Edmund, and edited a collection of canons (Benedictines, Delaney).
1199 Homobonus of Cremona, lay saint; life of the utmost rectitude integrity; known for his charity concern for poor devoted profits to relief some he looked after in his own house. (RM)
Cremónæ, in Insúbria, sancti Homobóni Confessóris; quem, miráculis clarum, Innocéntius Papa Tértius in Sanctórum númerum rétulit.
    At Cremona, in the duchy of Milan, St. Homobonus, confessor, renowned for miracles, whom Innocent III placed among the saints.

1197 ST HOMOBONUS: lay saint; honest merchant, prayer accompanied all his actions; not content with giving his tenths to the distressed members of Christ, he seemed to set no bounds to his alms; he sought out the poor in their homes and, whilst he relieved their corporal necessities, he exhorted them to a good life;

COMMERCE, as Alban Butler justly remarks, is often looked upon as an occasion of too great attachment to the things of this world and of too eager a desire of gain, as well as of lying, fraud and injustice. That these are the vices of men, not the faults of the profession, is clear from the example of this and other saints. Homo­bonus was son of a merchant at Cremona in Lombardy, who gave him this name (which signifies “good man”) at baptism. Whilst he trained his son up to his own mercantile business without any school education, he inspired in him both by example and instruction a love of probity, integrity and virtue. The saint from his childhood abhorred the very shadow of untruth or injustice. To honesty Homobonus added economy, care and industry. His business he looked upon as an employment given him by God, and he pursued it with diligence and a proper regard to himself, his family and the commonwealth of which he was a member. If a tradesman’s books are not well kept, if there is not order and regularity in the conduct of his business, if he does not give his mind seriously to it, he neglects an essential and Christian duty. Homobonus was a saint by acquitting himself diligently and uprightly, for supernatural motives, of all the obligations of his profession.

In due course St Homobonus married, and his wife was a prudent and faithful assistant in the government of his household. Ambition, vanity and ostentation are no less preposterous than destructive vices in the middle classes of society, whose characteristics should be modesty, moderation and simplicity. Whatever exceeds this in dress, housekeeping or other expenses is unnatural and affected, offensive to others, and uneasy and painful to the persons themselves. A man of low stature only becomes frightful by strutting upon stilts. The merchant may be an honour and support of society, but an ostentatious parade least of all suits his character or conduces to the happiness of his state. St Homobonus avoided such common rocks on which so many traders dash. And, moreover, not content with giving his tenths to the distressed members of Christ, he seemed to set no bounds to his alms; he sought out the poor in their homes and, whilst he relieved their corporal necessities, he exhorted them to a good life. The author of his life assures us that God often recognized his charity by miracles in favour of those whom he relieved. It was his custom every night to go to the church of St Giles, for prayer accompanied all his actions and it was in its exercise that he gave up his soul to God. For, on November 13, 1197, during Mass, at the Gloria in Excelsis he stretched out his arms in the figure of a cross and fell on his face to the ground, which those who saw him thought he had done out of devotion. When he did not stand up at the gospel they took more notice and, coming to him, found he was dead. Sicard, Bishop of Cremona, went himself to Rome to solicit his canonization, which Pope Innocent III decreed in 1199.

A short Medieval Latin life was printed in 1857 by A. Maini under the title S. Homoboni civis Cremonensis Vita antiquior, but besides this we have little more information than is provided by a few breviary lessons. St Homobonus is, however, mentioned by Sicard of Cremona, his contemporary, and he was canonized (Potthast, Regesta, vol. i, p. 55 less than two years after his death. As patron of tailors and cloth workers his fame spread not only over Italy, but into Germany (under the name “Gutman”) and into France. A volume of quite imposing dimension, was published about him in 1674 by 0. Belladori under the title of Il trafficante celeste, oceano di santità e tresoriero del cielo, Huomobuono iI Santo, cittadino Cremonese. More modern popular booklets have been written by F, Camozzi (1898), D. Bergamaschi (1899), R. Saccani (1938) and others. Marco Vida, the sixteenth-century neo-classical poet (who disapproved the “low style” of Homer), was a native of Cremona and honoured St Homobonus with a hymn, of which Alban Butler quotes four stanzas. He greatly admired Vida and here calls him “the Christian Virgil”.

(Also known as Homobonius) Born in Cremona, Lombardy, Italy; died November 13, 1197; canonized on January 12, 1199, by Pope Innocent III. Son of a wealthy merchant, Homobonus Tucingo was prophetically baptized Uomobuono, 'good man.' His father taught him the business and he successfully managed it after his father's death. He married and led a life of the utmost rectitude and integrity. Homobonus was known for his charity and concern for the poor because he devoted a large part of his profits to the relief of those in want, some of whom he looked after in his own house. Morning and evening he could be found in Saint Giles Church in Cremona, where, in fact, he died suddenly on November 13 while attending Mass. His virtues were not appreciated by his wife until after his death, when the people of Cremona clamored for his canonization which was decreed two years later by Pope Innocent III (Attwater, Benedictines, Delaney, Encyclopedia, Schamoni).

In art he is a merchant surrounded by beggars and the sick. At times there is a flask of wine near him or angels are shown making garments for him. He is the patron of burghers, merchants, smiths, tailors, clothworkers, and shoemakers. Venerated at Cremona (Delaney, Roeder).

1197 St. Homobonus Confessor patron of tailors cloth workers
He was born in Cremona, Italy, where he became a merchant. Married, he was a model of virtue beloved by all. Homobonus died on November 13 while attending Mass at St. Giles Church in Cremona. His fellow citizens petitioned the Holy See for his canonization, which was performed in 1199.

1280 Blessed Mark of Scala, OSB Abbot (AC).
A Benedictine abbot of Sant'Angelo di Scala of the Congregation of Montevergine (Benedictines).

1463 St. Didacus several miracles restoring patients eremite kind gentle
Complúti, in Hispánia, natális sancti Dídaci Confessóris, ex Ordine Minórum, humilitáte célebris; quem Xystus Quintus, Póntifex Máximus, Sanctórum catálogo adscrípsit.  Ipsíus autem festum sequénti die celebrátur.
    At Alcala in Spain, the birthday of St. Didacus, confessor, a member of the Order of Friars Minor well known for his humility.  Pope Sixtus V included him in the catalogue of the saints and his feast is celebrated today.
Sancti Dídaci, ex Ordine Minórum, Confessóris; cujus dies natális recólitur prídie hujus diéi.
    St. Didacus, confessor of the Order of Friars Minor, whose birthday occurred on the preceding day.

1463 ST DIDACUS, OR DIEGO
In the United States of America the feast of St Frances Xavier Cabrini is celebrated on this date. See Vol. IV, p. 593ff.

DIDACUS was a native of the little town of San Nicolas del Puerto in the diocese of Seville, and his parents were poor folk. Near that town a holy priest led an eremitical life. Didacus obtained his consent to live with him and, though very young, he imitated the austerities and devotions of his master. They cultivated together a little garden, and also employed themselves in making wooden spoons, trenchers and such-like utensils.

   After having lived thus a recluse for some years he was obliged to return to his home, but he soon after went to a convent of the Observant Friar Minors at Arrizafa, and there took the habit among the lay brothers. After his profession he was sent to the mission of his order in the Canary Islands, where he did a great work in instructing and converting the people. Eventually, in 1445 he, though a lay brother was appointed guardian of the chief convent in those islands, called Fuerteventura. After four years he was recalled to Spain, and lived in several friaries about Seville with great fervour and recollection. In the year 1450 a jubilee was celebrated at Rome and, St Bernardino of Siena being canonized at the same time, very many religious of the Order of St Francis were assembled there. Didacus went thither with Father Alonzo de Castro, and at Rome he had to attend his companion during a dangerous illness. His devotion in this duty attracted the notice of his superiors and he was put in charge of the many sick friars who were accommodated in the infirmary of the convent of Ara Caeli. St Didacus was thus engaged for three months, and is said to have miraculously restored some of his patients. He lived for another thirteen years after his return to Spain, chiefly at the friaries of Salcedo and Alcala in Castile. 

In 1463 he was taken ill at Alcalà, and in his last moments asked for a cord (such as the friars wear); he put it about his neck and, holding a cross in his hands, begged the pardon of all his brethren assembled about his bed. Then, fixing his eyes on the crucifix, he repeated with great tenderness the words of the hymn on the cross, “Dulce lignum, dulces clavos, dulce pondus sustinet”, and peacefully died on November 12. Several miracles were attributed to him in his lifetime, and many more through his intercession after his death. King Philip II, out of gratitude for one in favour of his son, solicited the saint’s canonization, which was decreed in 1588.

There is apparently no medieval life of St Didacus, but the various Franciscan chronicles of later date supply copious information. For example, Father Mark of Lisbon (d. 1591) devotes a long section to San Diego see the Italian translation (1501), vol. iii, fol. 155 seq. Among separate biographies may be mentioned Moreno de la Rea, Vida del S. Fray Diego (1602) and two slight sketches in more modern times, by Berguin and Chappuis in French (1901) and by A. Gioia in Italian (1907). The canonization of St Didacus (1588) was an occasion for rejoicing in Spain one or two of the booklets with panegyrics delivered at the time are in the British Museum.  

Didacus was a native of the little town of San Nicolas of del Puerto in the diocese of Seville, and his parents were poor folk. Near that town a holy priest led an eremitical life. Didacus obtained his consent to live with him and, though very young, he imitated the austerities and devotions of his master. They cultivated together a little garden, and also employed themselves in making wooden spoons, trenchers and such like utensils. After having lived thus a recluse for some years he was obliged to return to his home, but he soon after went to a convent of the Observant Friar Minors at Arrizafa, and there took the habit among the lay brothers.
After his profession he was sent to the mission of his Order in the Canary Islands, where he did a great work in instructing and converting the people. Eventually, in 1445, he, though a lay brother, was appointed chief guardian of a chief convent in those islands, called Fuerteventura. After four years he was recalled to Spain, and lived in several friaries about Seville with great fervor and recollection. In the year 1450 a jubilee was celebrated at Rome and, St. Bernardine of Siena being canonized at the same time, very many religious of the Order of St. Francis were assembled there. Didacus went there with FAther Alonzo de Castro, and at Rome he had to attend his companion during a dangerous illness. His devotion in this duty attracted the notice of his superiors and he was put in charge of the many sick friars who were accommodated in the infirmary of the convent of Ara Caeli.
St. Didacus was thus engaged for three months, and is said to have miraculously restored some of his patients. He lived for another thirteen years after his return to Spain, chiefly at the Friaries of Salcedo and Alcala in Castille. In 1463 he was taken ill at Alcala and in his last moments asked for a cord (such as the Friars wear); he put it about his neck and, holding a cross in his hands begged the pardon of all his brethren assembled about his bed. THen, fixing his eyes on the crucifix, he repeated with great tenderness the words of the hymn on the cross, "Dulce lignum, dulces clavos, dulce pondus sustinet", and peacefully died on November 12. Several miracles were attributed to him in his lifetime and many more through his intercession after his death.
King Philip II, out of gratitude for one in favor of his son, solicitated the saint's canonization which was decreed in 1588.

Didacus of Alcalà, OFM (RM) (also known as Diego, Diaz) Born near Seville, Spain, c. 1400; died at Alcalà de Henares, 1463; canonized 1588. Born of poor parents, the young Diego lived for a time as a solitary and then joined the Franciscans as a lay brother at Arrizafa.  Although remaining a lay brother, Diego was appointed doorkeeper of Fuerteventura friary in the Canary Islands because of his ability and goodness. Here he did great work among the poor, and earned such a reputation for holiness that in 1445 he was chosen as superior of the house for a term.  Later he was recalled to Spain, and passed the last 13 years of his life in humble duties at various houses of his order in Spain. After a pilgrimage to Rome in 1450, died at the friary of Alcalà in Castile. Diego's chief devotion was to Our Lord in the Blessed Sacrament of the Altar (Attwater, Benedictines, Encyclopedia).
1568 Stanislaus Kostka, SJ (RM); known for his studious ways, deep religious fervor, and mortifications. After he recovered from a serious illness during which he experienced several visions, he decided to join the Jesuits; experienced ecstasies at Mass.

1568 ST STANISLAUS KOSTKA
THE Roman Martyrology, in referring to him on August 15, the day of his death, truly says of St Stanislaus Kostka that he “was made perfect in a short while and fulfilled many times by the angelic innocence of his life”. He was the second son of John Kostka, senator of Poland, and Margaret Kryska, and was born in the castle of Rostkovo in 1550. The first elements of letters he learned at home under a private tutor, Dr John Bilinsky, who attended him and his elder brother, Paul, to the college of the Jesuits at Vienna when the saint was fourteen years old.

   From the first Stanislaus gave as much of his time as possible to prayer and study, and he was notably sensitive to any coarseness of talk. “Don’t tell that story before Stanislaus”, his father would say to his free-spoken guests, “he would faint.” When he arrived at Vienna and was lodged among the pupils of the Jesuits, everyone was struck by the recollection and devotion with which he lived and prayed. Eight months after their arrival the Emperor Maximilian II took from the Jesuits the house which Ferdinand I had lent them for their students. Paul Kostka, two years older than his brother, was a high-spirited youth, fond of amusement, and he prevailed on Bilinsky to take lodgings in a Lutheran’s house in the city. This did not at all please Stanislaus, but Paul treated his brother’s devotion and reserve with contemptuous amusement. One day when Paul had been ill-treating him Stanislaus rounded on him with the boyish taunt, “This will end in my running away and not coming back. And then you’ll have to explain to father and mother.” Meanwhile he communicated every Sunday and holy day, always fasted the day before his communion, and when he was not at church or college he was always to be found at his devotions or studies in his own room. He dressed quietly, practised bodily mortifications, and particularly disliked having to attend dancing classes. Paul’s lack of sympathy became downright bullying and Dr Bilinsky himself, though not unreasonable, was far from being sufficiently sympathetic.

After nearly two years of this Stanislaus was taken ill and wished to receive viaticum; but the Lutheran landlord would not allow the Blessed Sacrament to be brought to his house. The boy in extreme affliction recommended himself to the intercession of St Barbara (to whose confraternity he belonged), and he seemed in a vision to be communicated by two angels. The Blessed Virgin is said to have appeared to him in another vision, told him that the hour of his death was not yet come, and bade him devote himself to God in the Society of Jesus. He had already entertained such a thought, and after his recovery petitioned to be admitted. At Vienna the provincial, Father Maggi, dared not receive him, for fear of incurring the anger of his father. Stanislaus therefore determined to walk if necessary to Rome itself to ask the father general of the Society in person. He stole away on foot to Augsburg and thence to Dillingen, to make the same request first to St Peter Canisius, provincial of Upper Germany. He set out on his 350-mile walk, dressed in coarse clothes, and immediately his flight was discovered: Paul Kostka and Bilinsky rode off in pursuit. Various reasons are given to account for their failure to overtake or recognize him. St Peter Canisius received him encouragingly and set him to wait on the students of the college at table and clean out their rooms, which he did with such respect and humility that the students were astonished, though he was utterly unknown to them. Canisius, after having kept him three weeks, sent him with two companions to Rome, where he went to St Francis Borgia, then general of the Society, and earnestly renewed his petition. St Francis granted it, and Stanislaus was admitted in 1567, when he was seventeen years old. He had received from his father a most angry letter, threatening that he would procure the banishment of the Jesuits out of Poland and abusing Stanislaus for putting on “contemptible dress and following a profession unworthy of his birth”. Stanis­laus answered it in the most dutiful manner, but expressed a firm purpose of serving God according to his vocation. Without disturbance or trouble of mind he applied himself to his duties, recommending all things to God.

It was the saint’s utmost endeavour, declared his novice-master, Father Fazio, to sanctify in the most perfect manner all his ordinary actions, and he set no bounds to his mortifications except what obedience to his director prescribed. His faults he exaggerated with unfeigned simplicity, and the whole life of this novice seemed a continual prayer. The love, which he had for Jesus Christ in the Holy Sacrament, was so ardent that his face appeared on fire as soon as he entered the church, and he was often seen in a kind of ecstasy at Mass and after receiving communion. But his model novitiate was not destined to last more than nine months. The summer heat of Rome was too much for St Stanislaus, he had frequent fainting-fits, and he knew that he had not long to live. On the feast of the dedication of St Mary Major, talking with Father Emmanuel de Sa about the Assumption of our Lady, he said: “How happy a day for all the saints was that on which the Blessed Virgin was received into Heaven Perhaps the blessed celebrate it with special joy, as we do on earth. I hope myself to be there for the next feast they will keep of it.” No particular significance was attached to this remark at the time, but ten days later it was remembered. On St Laurence’s day he found himself ill and two days later, when taken to a better bedroom, he made the sign of the cross upon his bed, saying he should never more rise from it. Father Fazio jokingly rallied him on his physical weakness. “0 man of little heart” he said. “Do you give up for so slight a thing?” “I am a man of little heart”, replied Stanislaus, “but it is not so slight a matter, for I shall die of it.” Early in the morning of the Assumption he whispered to Father Ruiz that he saw the Blessed Virgin accompanied with many angels, and quietly died a little after three o’clock in the morning.

A month later Paul Kostka arrived in Rome with instructions from his father to bring back Stanislaus to Poland at all costs. The shock of finding him dead made Paul carefully consider his own behaviour with regard to his brother, and during the process of beatification he was one of the principal witnesses. Dr Bilinsky was another. He said among other things that, “The blessed boy never had a good word from Paul. And we both knew all the time the holiness and devotion of all that he did.” Paul was bitterly remorseful all his life, and at the age of sixty himself asked for admission to the Society of Jesus. St Stanislaus was canonized in 1726, and is venerated as a lesser patron of his native country.

The depositions of witnesses and other documents presented in the cause of the beatifica­tion have been in great measure utilized by the saint’s biographers, but some of these materials have only been printed entire in recent time. An account by S. Varsevicki, who lived in the same Jesuit house with the saint, only saw the light in 1895 and perhaps the fullest early narrative, that of Father Ubaldini, after remaining in manuscript for more than two centuries, was published in installments in the Analecta Bollandiana, vol. ix (1890), and following volumes. But St Stanislaus had long before found many biographers to recount from their different points of view the story of his short life, beginning with the Latin booklet of Father Sacchini in 1609. Father Bartoli and Father d’Orléans in the seventeenth century wrote lives which went through many editions. Fathers Michel, Gruber and Goldie have presented the same facts in a more modern setting. From a literary point of view the booklet of Fr C. C. Martindale, Christ’s Cadets (1913), and that of Mother Maud Monahan, On the King’s Highway (1927), make a great appeal. Cf. also the Life of St Peter Canisius, by Fr James Brodrick (1935), pp. 674—676.  

Born in Rostkovo Castle, Poland, October 28, 1550; died 1568. Son of a Polish, Stanislaus was educated by a private tutor and then sent to the Jesuit college in Vienna when he was 14. He was soon known for his studious ways, deep religious fervor, and mortifications. After he recovered from a serious illness during which he experienced several visions, he decided to join the Jesuits.
Stanislaus Kostka
Image of Saint Stanislaus Kostka courtesy of Saint Charles Borromeo Church

Opposed by his father he was refused admission by the Vienna provincial, who feared the father's reaction if he admitted the youth, Stanislaus walked 350 miles to Dillengen where Saint Peter Canisius, provincial of Upper Germany, took him in and then sent him to Rome to Francis Borgia, father general of the Society of Jesus, who accepted him into the Jesuits in October 1567, at age 17. He practiced the most severe mortifications, experienced ecstasies at Mass, and lived a life of great sanctity and angelic innocence. He died in Rome on August 15, only nine months after joining the Jesuits, and was canonized in 1726. He is one of the lesser patrons of Poland (Attwater, Benedictines, Delaney).

Saint Stanislaus is generally rendered in art as a very young Jesuit in adoration before a monstrance.
Sometimes (1) two angels and Saint Barbara bring him the Eucharist; (2) the Virgin and Child appear to him; or (3) there is a pilgrim's staff and hat near him (Roeder).

Venerated in Poland. Patron of young people (because of his youth). Invoked against broken limbs, eye troubles, fever, and palpitation. Also when in doubt (Roeder).

1917 St. Frances Xavier Cabrini founded schools hospitals orphanages Patron of immigrants; In 1946, Pope Pius XII named her patroness of all emigrants and immigrants.
St. Frances Xavier Cabrini, Virgin St. Frances was born in Lombardi, Italy in 1850, one of thirteen children. At eighteen, she desired to become a Nun, but poor health stood in her way. She helped her parents until their death, and then worked on a farm with her brothers and sisters.

One day a priest asked her to teach in a girls' school and she stayed for six years. At the request of her Bishop, she founded the Missionary Sisters of the Sacred Heart to care for poor children in schools and hospitals. Then at the urging of Pope Leo XIII she came to the United States with six nuns in 1889 to work among the Italian immigrants.

Filled with a deep trust in God and endowed with a wonderful administrative ability, this remarkable woman soon founded schools, hospitals, and orphanages in this strange land and saw them flourish in the aid of Italian immigrants and children. At the time of her death, at Chicago, Illinois on December 22, 1917, her institute numbered houses in England, France, Spain, the United States, and South America. In 1946, she became the first American citizen to be canonized when she was elevated to sainthood by Pope Pius XII.
Frances Xavier Cabrini V (AC)
Born at Sant'Angelo Lodigiano (diocese of Lodi), Lombardy, Italy, on July 15, 1850; died in Chicago, Illinois, on December 22, 1917; beatified in 1938; canonized on July 7, 1946; feast day was December 22.
The life of Saint Frances is another remarkable story that teaches us the value of persistence in hope. I've seen a photograph of her--she was absolutely gorgeous with her dark hair, broad mouth, and shining, deep eyes. She was said to be small of stature and big of spirit. Naturalized in 1909, she is the first U.S. citizen to be canonized, but Francesca Maria was the Italian born 13th child of Augustine Cabrini, a farmer, and his Milanese wife Stella Oldini.

On the day she was born, a flock of white doves flew down to the farm where her father was threshing grain. Several times in her later life flocks of white birds appeared. Francesca loved them and compared them to angels or souls she would help save, or to new sisters coming to join her community.

Her parents baptized her Maria Francesca Saverio after the missionary saint Francis Xavier. Wittingly or not, it seems that her destiny was mapped out early. Because her mother's health was delicate, Francesca was taught mainly by her elder sister Rosa, a school teacher, and was encouraged by her uncle, Father Oldini, to become a foreign missionary. He knew her secret childhood game of filling paper boats with violets and setting them loose in the river as she pretended that the violets were missionaries going to convert people in far-off lands. Her parents wanted her to be a teacher, however, and sent her to a convent boarding school at Arluno.

As a child she learned to pray well by the example of her family. Her mother rose early to pray for an hour before going to Mass, and at the end of the day she prayed for another hour. Francesca would frequently steal away from her schoolmates to pray by herself in some quiet spot.

In 1863, at the age of 13, Francesca entered the convent of the Sacred Heart at Arluna, where she made a vow of virginity. When she graduated with honors at age 18, she was fully qualified as a teacher. At 20 she was orphaned, and felt called to be a nun. Like several saints before her, however, no one seemed to want her because her health was so poor that no one thought she would live very long, and rather discounted her as far as being of much use to her order.

By the time Francesca was 21, she had suffered much: in addition to the loss of her parents, 10 of her siblings died. From 1868 to 1872, she worked hard nursing the sick poor in her hometown, including a woman who died of cancer. She also had to deal with her own illness (smallpox) in 1871. These hardships combined to teach her that everyone in this world has a cross to carry.

After her recovery (1872) she began to teach in the public school of Vidardo. In 1874 after being turned down by the Sacred Heart nuns who taught her and another congregation, Don Serrati, the priest in whose school she was teaching, invited Francesca to help manage a small orphanage at Codogno in the diocese of Lodi. The House of Providence had been mismanaged by its foundress the eccentric Antonia Tondini.

Msgr. Serrati and the bishop of Todi, recognizing her intense love of God and bold holiness, and her deep love for the poor, invited her to turn the institution into a religious community. Reluctantly, she agreed. From Antonia, Francesca received only trouble and abuse, but she persisted. With seven recruits, she took her first vows in 1877. The bishop made her superioress.

Antonia's behavior became worse--she was thought to have become unbalanced--but Francesca persevered for another three years. Then the bishop himself gave up hope and closed the institution. That was according to Francesca's desires--more than anything else, she wanted to be a missionary to China. Thus, in 1880, the bishop counselled her to found a congregation of missionary sisters, since that was what she wanted to be and he didn't know of any such order. Francesca moved to an abandoned Franciscan friary at Codogno, and drew up a rule for the community. Its main object was to be the Christian education of girls in Catholic schismatic or pagan countries under the title of Missionary Sisters of the Sacred Heart.

Francesca and her sisters placed their complete trust in God. When there was no money to provide food, money miraculously appeared. When there was no milk for the orphans, a formerly empty container brimmed with milk. When a nun was again sent to an empty breadbox, the box was again full. God can never be outdone in his generosity. He promised that He would provide for our needs and He does for those who trust Him.

The same year the rule was approved, a daughter house was opened at Grumello. The sisters of the Sacred Heart soon spread to Milan. Francesca was a demanding mistress. She got up very early, an hour before the sisters who also got up early. Four hours daily were spent in prayer by each sister regardless of what else needed to be done.

In 1887, Francesca went to Rome to gain approbation of her congregation and permission to open a house in Rome. After an initially unsuccessful interview with the cardinal vicar--the congregation was deemed too young for approval--Francesca won him over. She asked to open two houses in Rome, a free school and a children's home, and the first decree of approval of the Missionary Sisters was issued in 1888.

Bishop Scalabrini of Piacenza, who had established the Society of Saint Charles to work among Italian immigrants in America, suggested that Francesca travel there to help these priests. Francesca longed to evangelize China, but realized that Italian immigrants in the U.S.--50,000 in New York alone--needed all the help that her order could give them. Archbishop Corrigan of New York sent her a formal invitation, so she decided to consult with the pope. In 1889, Pope Leo XIII gave his blessing to the enterprise. Despite her fear of water caused by a childhood accident, she set off across the Atlantic, landing in New York in 1889 (age 39) with six of her sisters.

Things did not get off to a good start, even with the archbishop's patronage and warm welcome. Apparently, the orphanage she was to have managed was abandoned because of a dispute with the benefactress. There was much to be done: A whole nation of orphans and elderly to be comforted--a daunting task with no money and no hope of any in sight. The archbishop suggested that she return home. Francesca replied that the pope had sent her to America and so she must stay. Within a few weeks Francesca had mended the rift, found a house for the sisters, and started the orphanage.

As with every difficulty she encountered throughout her life, with each new trial she would ask, "Who is doing this? We?--or Our Lord?" Even so, she encouraged her sisters to use efficiency and business acumen in the cause of charity, which won the respect of the most hard-headed and hard-hearted Americans.

Later that year she revisited Italy, as she would almost every year to bring back new missionaries. This trip she took with her the first two Italo-American recruits to the congregation. Nine months later she returned, bringing reinforcements to take over West Park, on the Hudson, from the Society of Jesus. The orphanage was transferred to this house, which became the motherhouse and novitiate of the order in the U.S.

In addition to the 24 times she crossed the Atlantic, Francesca travelled throughout the Americas for 28 years--from coast to coast in the U.S. by train and on muleback across the Andes. First she went to Managua, Nicaragua, where under sometimes dangerous circumstances she took over an orphanage and opened a boarding house. On her way back, she visited New Orleans, and there made another new foundation.

Francesca was slow in learning English, but she had great business acumen. She was sometimes overly strict and self-righteous-- rejecting illegitimate children from her fee-paying schools, for example--and she was slow to recognize that non-Catholics could truly mean well.

In 1892 one of Francesca's greatest undertakings--Columbus Hospital--was opened in New York. After another visit to Italy, she travelled to Costa Rica, Panama, Chile, and Brazil. In Buenos Aires, Argentina, she opened a school for girls.

In 1900 Francesca visited Pope Leo XIII again. He was then 90 years old. One day he said to her, "Let us work, Cabrini, let us work, and what a heaven will be ours!" Then after he had passed, he turned around and looked at her again. "Let us work, Cabrini!" he said, his kind old face all wreathed in smiles.

After her next trip to Italy, she travelled to France, opening her first European houses outside Italy. By 1907, when the order was finally approved, there were over 1,000 members in eight countries (including Britain, Spain, and Latin America), founded more than fifty houses, and numerous free schools, high schools, fifty hospitals (including four of the greats), and other institutions. At the time of her death, the congregation had grown to 67 houses with over 4,000 sisters.

This sickly woman's health finally began to fail in 1911, but she kept going even through the war. On December 21, 1917, fearing that the children in one of her schools might miss their usual treat of candy for Christmas, Francesca began to make up little parcels with her own hands. "Let's hurry," she said to her sisters, "the time is short, and I want to be sure that the children will have their treat." The time was indeed short for she died of malaria the very next day in the Chicago convent.

At first her relics were placed at West Park, Illinois. Her body now rests in the chapel of the Mother Cabrini High School in New York City, where you can see it in a state of marvellous preservation in its glass casket. The work begun for Italian immigrants was carried on for all without distinction (including convicts in Sing-Sing prison) (Attwater, Bentley, Benedictines, Delaney, Encyclopedia, Girzone, Melady, Schamoni, Stanbrook, White).

Because she was open to God, He used her to fulfill His purpose. We never know how God is going to use us; therefore, we have to wait expectantly, openly to see what He has planned. We can be sure that He won't disappoint us. God has a way of turning each attentive life into an adventure that brings joy and satisfaction and peace to His servant and those around him.
In 1946, Pope Pius XII named her patroness of all emigrants and immigrants.

 Sunday   Saints of this Day November 13 Idus Novémbris    

November 2 Feast of All Souls:  PURGATORY - - CONFESSIONS FROM THE SAINTS
November is the month of the Holy Souls in Purgatory since 1888;
   40 days for Life Day

Pope Francis  PRAYER INTENTIONS FOR  November 2016
Universal: Countries Receiving Refugees

That the countries which take in a great number of displaced persons and refugees may find support for their efforts which show solidarity.

Evangelization: Collaboration of Priests and Laity
That within parishes, priests and lay people may collaborate in service to the community without giving in to the temptation of discouragement.


God Bless Mother Angelica 1923-2016
ewtnmissionaries.com

On Death and Life
"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!    (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)
                      

                                                                           
     
40 Days for Life  11,000+ saved lives in 2015
We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
40 days for Life Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world

It is a great poverty that a child must die so that you may live as you wish -- Mother Teresa
 Saving babies, healing moms and dads, 'The Gospel of Life'

"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
It Makes No Sense Not To Believe In GOD 
Every Christian must be a living book
wherein one can read the teaching of the gospel

Jesus brings us many Blessings
 
The more we pray, the more we wish to pray. Like a fish which at first swims on the surface of the water, and afterwards plunges down, and is always going deeper; the soul plunges, dives, and loses itself in the sweetness of conversing with God. -- St. John Vianney

  Month by Month of Saintly Dedications


The Rosary html Mary Mother of GOD -- Her Rosary Here
Mary Mother of GOD Mary's Divine Motherhood: FEASTS OF OUR LADY
     of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

May 9 – Our Lady of the Wood (Italy, 1607) 
Months of Dedication
January is the month of the Holy Name of Jesus since 1902;
March is the month of Saint Joseph since 1855;
May, the month of Mary, is the oldest and most well-known Marian month, officially since 1724;
June is the month of the Sacred Heart since 1873;
July is the month of the Precious Blood since 1850;
August is the month of the Immaculate Heart of Mary;
September is the month of Our Lady of Sorrows since 1857;
October is the month of the Rosary since 1868;
November is the month of the Holy Souls in Purgatory since 1888;
December is the month of the Immaculate Conception.

In all, five months of the year are dedicated to Mary.
The idea of dedicating months came from Rome and promotion of the month of Mary owes much to the Jesuits.  arras.catholique.fr


Pray that the witness of 40 Days for Life bears abundant fruit, and that we begin again each day to storm the gates of hell until God welcomes us into the gates of heaven.

If you seek patience, you will find no better example than the cross. Great patience occurs in two ways:
either when one patiently suffers much, or when one suffers things which one is able to avoid and yet does not avoid.
Christ endured much on the cross, and did so patiently, because when he suffered he did not threaten;
he was led like a sheep to the slaughter and he did not open his mouth.-- St. Thomas Aquinas


We begin our day by seeing Christ in the consecrated bread, and throughout the day we continue to see Him in the torn bodies of our poor. We pray, that is, through our work, performing it with Jesus, for Jesus and upon Jesus.
The poor are our prayer. They carry God in them. Prayer means praying everything, praying the work.
We meet the Lord who hungers and thirsts, in the poor.....and the poor could be you or I or any person kind enough to show us his or her love and to come to our place.
Because we cannot see Christ, we cannot express our love to Him in person.
But our neighbor we can see, and we can do for him or her what we would love to do for Jesus if He were visible.
-- Mother Teresa
My God, I believe, I adore, I trust and I love Thee.  I beg pardon for those who do not believe, do not adore, do not love Thee.  O most Holy trinity, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, I adore Thee profoundly.
 I offer Thee the most precious Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ, present in all the Tabernacles of the world,  in reparation for the outrages, sacrileges and indifference by which He is offended,
and by the infite merits of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

I beg the conversion of poor sinners,  Amen Fatima Prayer, Angel of Peace
Mary's Divine Motherhood
Pope Francis and Pope Benedict XVI { 2013 } Catholic Church In China { article here}
1648 to1930 St. Augustine Zhao Rong and 120 Companions Christianity arrived in China by way of Syria -- 600s.
        Depending on China's relations with outside world,
Christianity for centuries was free to grow or forced to operate secretly.

How do I start the Five First Saturdays? 
Called in the Gospel “the Mother of Jesus,” Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as “the Mother of my Lord” (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity. Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos). 
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
“The Blessed Virgin was eternally predestined, in conjunction with the incarnation of the divine Word, to be the Mother of God. By decree of divine Providence, she served on earth as the loving mother of the divine Redeemer, an associate of unique nobility, and the Lord's humble handmaid. She conceived, brought forth, and nourished Christ.”
The voice of the Father is heard, the Son enters the water, and the Holy Spirit appears in the form of a dove.
   THE spirit and example of the world imperceptibly instil the error into the minds of many that there is a kind of middle way of going to Heaven; and so, because the world does not live up to the gospel, they bring the gospel down to the level of the world. It is not by this example that we are to measure the Christian rule, but words and life of Christ. All His followers are commanded to labour to become perfect even as our heavenly Father is perfect, and to bear His image in our hearts that we may be His children. We are obliged by the gospel to die to ourselves by fighting self-love in our hearts, by the mastery of our passions, by taking on the spirit of our Lord.
   These are the conditions under which Christ makes His promises and numbers us among His children, as is manifest from His words which the apostles have left us in their inspired writings. Here is no distinction made or foreseen between the apostles or clergy or religious and secular persons. The former, indeed, take upon themselves certain stricter obligations, as a means of accomplishing these ends more perfectly; but the law of holiness and of disengagement of the heart from the world is geeral and binds all the followers of Christ.

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THE EUCHARIST, A MYSTERY TO BE BELIEVED POST-SYNODAL APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION
SACRAMENTUM CARITATIS OF THE HOLY FATHER BENEDICT XVI
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Miracles by Century 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000    1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800   1900  Miracles_BLay Saints
Morning Prayer and Hymn    Meditation of the Day    Prayer for Priests    Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List  Here
We are called upon with the whole Church militant on earth to join in praising and thanking God for the grace and glory he has bestowed on his saints. At the same time we earnestly implore Him to exert His almighty power and mercy in raising us from our miseries and sins, healing the disorders of our souls and leading us by the path of repentance to the company of His saints, to which He has called us.
   They were once what we are now, travellers on earth they had the same weaknesses, which we have. We have difficulties to encounter so had the saints, and many of them far greater than we can meet with; obstacles from kings and whole nations, sometimes from the prisons, racks and swords of persecutors. Yet they surmounted these difficulties, which they made the very means of their virtue and victories. It was by the strength they received from above, not by their own, that they triumphed. But the blood of Christ was shed for us as it was for them and the grace of our Redeemer is not wanting to us; if we fail, the failure is in ourselves.
   THE saints and just, from the beginning of time and throughout the world, who have been made perfect, everlasting monuments of God’s infinite power and clemency, praise His goodness without ceasing; casting their crowns before His throne they give to Him all the glory of their triumphs: “His gifts alone in us He crowns.”
“The saints must be honored as friends of Christ and children and heirs of God, as John the theologian and evangelist says: ‘But as many as received him, he gave them the power to be made the sons of God....’ Let us carefully observe the manner of life of all the apostles, martyrs, ascetics and just men who announced the coming of the Lord. And let us emulate their faith, charity, hope, zeal, life, patience under suffering, and perseverance unto death, so that we may also share their crowns of glory” Exposition of the Orthodox Faith

Called in the Gospel the Mother of Jesus, Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as the Mother of my Lord (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son,  the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos).
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart ... From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque
On Friday during Holy Communion, He said these words to me, His unworthy slave, if I mistake not:
I promise you in the excessive mercy of my Heart that its all-powerful love will grant to all those who receive Holy Communion on nine first Fridays of consecutive months the grace of final repentance; they will not die under my displeasure or without receiving their sacraments, my divine Heart making itself their assured refuge at the last moment.
Margaret Mary was inspired by Christ to establish the Holy Hour and to pray lying prostrate with her face to the ground from eleven till midnight on the eve of the first Friday of each month, to share in the mortal sadness.
He endured when abandoned by His Apostles in His Agony, and to receive holy Communion on the first Friday of every month. In the first great revelation, He made known to her His ardent desire to be loved by men and His design of manifesting His Heart with all Its treasures of love and mercy, of sanctification and salvation.
He appointed the Friday after the octave of the feast of Corpus Christi as the feast of the Sacred Heart; He called her the Beloved Disciple of the Sacred Heart, and the heiress of all Its treasures. The love of the Sacred Heart was the fire which consumed her, and devotion to the Sacred Heart is the refrain of all her writings. In her last illness she refused all alleviation, repeating frequently: What have I in heaven and what do I desire on earth, but Thee alone, O my God, and died pronouncing the Holy Name of Jesus.
With regard to this promise it may be remarked: (1) that our Lord required Communion to be received on a particular day chosen by Him; (2) that the nine Fridays must be consecutive; (3) that they must be made in honor of His Sacred Heart, which means that those who make the nine Fridays must practice the devotion and must have a great love for our Lord; (4) that our Lord does not say that those who make the nine Fridays will be dispensed from any of their obligations or from exercising the vigilance necessary to lead a good life and overcome temptation; rather He implicitly promises abundant graces to those who make the nine Fridays to help them to carry out these obligations and persevere to the end; (5) that perseverance in receiving Holy Communion for nine consecutive First Firdays helps the faithful to acquire the habit of frequent Communion, which our Lord eagerly desires; and (6) that the practice of the nine Fridays is very pleasing to our Lord He promises such great reward, and all Catholics should endeavor to make nine Fridays.
How do I start the Five First Saturdays? by Fr. Tom O'Mahony.
On July 13,1917, Our Lady appeared for the third time to the three children of Fatima an showed them the vision of hell and made the now - famous thirteen prophecies. In this vision Our Lady said that 'GOD WISHES TO ESTABLISH IN THE WORLD DEVOTION to Her Immaculate Heart and that She would come TO ASK FOR THE COMMUNION OF REPARATION ON THE FIRST SATURDAYS...'  Eight years later, on December 10, 1925, Our Lady did indeed come back. She appeared (with the Child Jesus) to Lucia in the convent of the Dorothean Sisters in Pontevedra.
The Child Jesus spoke first:
'HAVE COMPASSION ON THE HEART OF YOUR MOST HOLY MOTHER WHICH IS COVERED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT, WHILE THERE IS NO ONE TO REMOVE THEM WITH AN ACT OF REPARATION.'

THE GREAT PROMISE
Our Lady then said: 'MY DAUGHTER LOOK AT MY HEART SURROUNDED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT BY THEIR BLASPHEMIES AND INGRATITUDE. YOU, AT LEAST, TRY TO CONSOLE ME, AND SAY THAT I PROMISE TO ASSIST AT THE HOUR OF DEATH WITH ALL THE GRACES NECESSARY FOR SALVATION, ALL THOSE WHO, ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS GO TO CONFESSION AND RECEIVE HOLY COMMUNION, RECITE FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY AND KEEP ME COMPANY FOR A QUARTER OF AN HOUR WHILE MEDITATING ON MYSTERIES OF THE ROSARY, WITH THE INTENTION OF MAKING REPARATION TO ME.'

The Five Reasons
Lucia once asked this question of Our Lord and received as an answer: 'MY DAUGHTER, THE MOTIVE IS SIMPLE, THERE ARE FIVE KINDS OF OFFENCES AND BLASPHEMIES UTTERED AGAINST THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY: (1) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION: (2) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER VIRGINITY: (3) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER DIVINE MATERNITY: (4) BLASPHEMIES OF THOSE WHO OPENLY SEEK TO FOSTER IN THE HEARTS OF CHILDREN INDIFFERENCE OR EVEN HATRED FOR THIS IMMACULATE MOTHER: (5) THE OFFENCES OF THOSE WHO DIRECTLY OUTRAGE HER IN HOLY IMAGES.'
From the above, it is easy to see that each of the Five Saturdays can correspond to a specific offence. By offering the graces received during each First Saturday as reparation for the offence being prayed for, the participant can hope to help remove the thorns from Our Lady's Heart.
What Do I Have To Do?
The devotion of First Saturdays, as requested by Our Lady of Fatima, carries with it the assurance of salvation. However, to derive profit from such a great promise of Our Lady, the devotion must be properly understood and duly performed.
The requirements as stipulated by Our Lady are as follows:
(1) CONFESSION, (2) COMMUNION, (3) FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY, (4) MEDITATION ON ONE OR MORE OF THE ROSARY MYSTERIES FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES, (5) TO DO ALL THESE THINGS IN THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION TO THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY, and (6) TO OBSERVE ALL THESE PRACTICES ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS.
(1) CONFESSION: A reparative confession means that the confession should not only be good (valid and licit), but also be offered in the spirit of reparation, in this case, to Mary's Immaculate Heart. This confession may be made on the First Saturday itself or some days before or after the First Saturday within the preceding octave would suffice.
(2) COMMUNION: The communion of reparation must be sacramental duly received with the intention of making reparation. This offering, like the confession, is an interior act and so no external action to express the intention is needed.