"Love of one's native land is one phase of the love of neighbor that Jesus enjoined on us all; "  Saint Lawrence O'Toole

It Makes No Sense Not To Believe In GOD 
Every Christian must be a living book wherein one can read the teaching of the gospel

Everyday the Church offers us riches
(516-445) In Judæa sancti Malachíæ Prophétæ. In Judea, St. Malachy, prophet.  Malachi means My Messenger
368  Sancti Hilárii, Epíscopi Pictaviénsis, Confessóris et Ecclésiæ Doctóris; qui prídie hujus diéi evolávit in cælum.

  664 St. Deusdedit first Anglo-Saxon primate of England Benedictine archbishop of Canterbury
1200 BD ODO OF NOVARA many miracles both during life and death, it horrified him to think that people should attribute to him any supernatural power.
1237 BD ROGER OF TODI received the habit of the Friars Minor from the hands of the Seraphic Father himself in 1216, appointed by St Francis to act as spiritual director to community of Bd Philippa Mareri at Rieti in Umbria under rule of St Clare, assisted Philippa on her deathbed in 1236; he died January 5, 1237.
1892 ST ANTONY PUCCI a member of a religious order, the Servants of Mary, spent most of his life and achieved holiness as a parish priest and miracles of healing took place at his grave

Please pray for those who have no one to pray for them.

 

The Virgin Mary of Nazareth
January is the month of the Holy Name of Jesus since 1902;
The First Moment of Christian Tradition Began in Mary's Heart (III)

When faith is strong it works wonders ( Mk 16:17 ).
 
Mary's heart is not a document, it's a source. "She stored up all these things in her heart"
(Lk 2:19 & 51), and that was the Word of God.
Excerpt from "Follow the Lamb" (Suivre l'Agneau)  Father Marie-Dominique Philippe Saint Paul Ed. 2005

THE HOLY NAME OF JESUS
      In Judæa sancti Malachíæ Prophétæ.       In Judea, St. Malachy, prophet.
 255 St. Felix of Nola Bishop distributed inheritance to the poor assistant to St. Maximus of Nola tomb famous for miracles
 340 St. Macrina the Elder Grandmother of Sts. Basil and Gregory of Nyssa
 309 Martyrs Monks of Mount Sinai slain by Bedouins
       Saint Moses was one of the Holy Monastic Fathers Slain at Sinai and Raithu.
 335 Saint Nino, Enlightener of Georgia and Equal of the Apostles
 346 St. Barbasymas bishop of Seleucia and Ctesiphon Martyr of Persia with 16 companions
 
368  Sancti Hilárii, Epíscopi Pictaviénsis, Confessóris et Ecclésiæ Doctóris; qui prídie hujus diéi evolávit in cælum.
 400 Saint Theodulus son of St Nilus the Faster Lord saved boy through prayers of his father
 552 St. Datius Bishop of Milan, Italy , exiled by the Arian Ostrogoths
 610 Saint Kentigern (meaning "head chief") of Glasgow "Mungo" meaning "dear one"
 664 St. Deusdedit first Anglo-Saxon primate of England Benedictine archbishop of Canterbury
8th v. Saint Stephen great ascetics glorious departure into Heaven with the angels
       St. Felix A Roman priest of whom nothing is known
       St. Euphrasius A bishop martyred by the Vandals
1180 Saint Lawrence O'Toole descendant of Irish petty kings
1200 BD ODO OF NOVARA He worked many miracles both during life and after death, but it horrified him to think that people should attribute to him any supernatural power.
1225 St. Sava patron of Serbia monk founded monasteries translated religious works into Serbian
1237 BD ROGER OF TODI received the habit of the Friars Minor from the hands of the Seraphic Father himself in 1216, that he was appointed by St Francis to act as spiritual director to the community founded and governed by Bd Philippa Mareri at Rieti in Umbria under the rule of St Clare, that he assisted Philippa on her deathbed in 1236, and that he died himself at Todi shortly afterwards on January 5, 1237.
1331 BD ODORIC OF PORDENONE IT would not be easy to find in secular literature a more adventurous career than that of the Franciscan Friar Odoric of Pordenone. Miracle worker
        Marytrs of Raithu Forty-three hermits in the Raithu Sinai Desert
1501 Servant of God John the Gardener; " as John insisted, forgiveness is the loveliest thing in God’s eyes."
1518 BD GILES OF LORENZANA his ecstatic prayer miracles, and gift of prophecy were renowned far and wide. In particular he is said to have been frequently seen raised from the ground and physically assaulted by the Evil One.
1811 St. Joseph Pignatelli, Pius XI said, served "chief link between Society of Jesus that had been and Society to be."
1833 Seraphim von Sarow
1892 ST ANTONY PUCCI a member of a religious order, the Servants of Mary, spent most of his life and achieved holiness as a parish priest and miracles of healing took place at his grave.

In Judæa sancti Malachíæ Prophétæ.
       In Judea, St. Malachy, prophet.

The Leavetaking of the Feast of Theophany takes place on January 14. The entire office of the Feast is repeated except for the Entrance, festal readings, Litya, Blessing of Loaves at Vespers, and the Polyeleos and festal Gospel at Matins. The festal Antiphons are not sung at Liturgy, and the Epistle and Gospel of the day are read.
255 St. Felix of Nola Bishop distributed inheritance to the poor assistant to St. Maximus of Nola tomb famous for miracles
 Nolæ, in Campánia, natális sancti Felícis Presbyteri, qui (ut sanctus Paulínus Epíscopus scribit), cum a persecutóribus post torménta in cárcerem missus esset, et cóchleis ac téstulis vinctus superpósitus jacéret, nocte ab Angelo solútus atque edúctus fuit; póstmodum vero, cessánte persecutióne, ibídem, cum multos ad Christi fidem exémplo vitæ ac doctrína convertísset, clarus miráculis quiévit in pace.
       At Nola in Campania, the birthday of St. Felix, priest, who (as is related by bishop St. Paulinus), after being subjected to torments by the persecutors, was cast into prison, bound hand and foot, and extended on shells and broken earthenware.  In the night, however, his bonds were loosened and he was delivered by an angel.  The persecution over, he brought many to the faith of Christ by his exemplary life and teaching, and, renowned for miracles, rested in peace.

260 ST FELIX OF NOLA
IT must be remembered that St Paulinus of Nola, who is our ultimate authority for the life of St Felix, lived more than a century after his time, and that it is probable that legendary accretions had already attached themselves to the tradition handed down. The story told by St Paulinus runs as follows:

St Felix was a native of Nola, a Roman colony in Campania, fourteen miles from Naples, where his father Hermias, who was by birth a Syrian and had served in the army, had purchased an estate and settled down. He had two sons, Felix and Hermias, to whom at his death he left his patrimony. The younger sought preferment in the world by following the profession of arms. Felix, to become in effect what his name in Latin imported, that is “happy”, resolved to follow no other standard than that of the King of kings, Jesus Christ. For this purpose he distributed most of his possessions among the poor, and was ordained priest by St Maximus, Bishop of Nola, who, charmed with his virtue and prudence, made him his right hand in those times of trouble, and looked upon him as his destined successor.

In the year 250 the Emperor Decius began a cruel persecution against the Church. Maximus, seeing himself marked out as a victim, retired into the desert, not through the fear of death but rather to preserve himself for the service of his flock. The persecutors, not finding him, seized on Felix, who in his absence was very zealous in the discharge of pastoral duties. The governor caused him to be scourged, then loaded with chains and cast into a dungeon, in which, as Prudentius informs us, the floor was spread all over with potsherds and pieces of broken glass, so that there was no place free from them on which the saint could either stand or lie. One night an angel appearing filled the prison with a bright light, and bade St Felix go to the aid of his bishop, who was in great distress. The confessor, seeing his chains fall off and the doors open, followed his guide, and was conducted to the place where Maximus lay in hunger and cold, speechless and unconscious:  for, through anxiety for his flock and the hardships of his solitary retreat, he had suffered more than a martyrdom. Felix, not being able to bring him to himself, had recourse to prayer; and discovering thereupon a bunch of grapes within reach, he squeezed some of the juice into his mouth, which had the desired effect. The good bishop, as soon as he beheld his friend Felix, begged to be conveyed back to his church. The saint, taking him on his shoulders, carried him to his home in the city before day appeared, where a devoted old woman took care of him.

Felix kept himself concealed, praying for the Church without ceasing, till the death of Decius in the year 251. He no sooner appeared again in public than his zeal so exasperated the pagans that they came to apprehend him; but though they met him, they did not recognize him. They even asked him where Felix was, a question to which he returned an evasive answer. The persecutors, going a little further, perceived their mistake, and returned; but Felix in the meantime had stepped a little out of the way, and crept through a hole in a ruinous wall, which was instantly closed up by spiders’ webs. His enemies, never imagining anything could have lately passed where they saw so dense a web, after a fruitless search elsewhere returned without their prey. Felix, finding among the ruins, between two houses, an old well half dry, hid himself there for six months, and obtained during that time wherewithal to subsist by means of a devout Christian woman.

Peace being restored to the Church, he quitted his retreat, and was received in the city with joy.
St Maximus died soon after, and all were unanimous in electing Felix bishop but he persuaded the people to make choice of Quintus, his senior in the priesthood. The remainder of the saint’s estate having been confiscated in the persecution, he was advised to press his legal claim, as others had done, who thereby recovered what had been taken from them. His answer was that in poverty he should be the more secure of possessing Christ. He could not even be prevailed upon to accept what the rich offered him. He rented a little spot of land, not exceeding three acres, which he tilled with his own hands to supply his own needs and to have something left for alms. Whatever was bestowed on him he gave immediately to the poor. If he had two coats he was sure to give them the better, and often exchanged his only one for the rags of some beggar. He died in a good old age, on January 14, on which day he is commemorated in the martyrologies.

More than a century had elapsed after the death of Felix when Paulinus, a distinguished Roman senator, settled in Nola and was elected bishop there. He testifies that crowds of pilgrims came from Rome and more distant places to visit the shrine of the saint on his festival. He adds that all brought some present or other to his church, such as candles to burn at his tomb and the like; but that for his own part he offered him the homage of his tongue and himself, though an unworthy gift. He expresses his devotion in the warmest terms, and believes that all the graces he received from Heaven were conferred on him through the inter­cession of St Felix. He describes at large the pictures of the whole history of the Old Testament in the church of St Felix, which were as so many books that instructed the ignorant. The holy bishop’s enthusiasm is reflected in his verses. He relates a number of miracles which were wrought at the tomb, as of persons cured of diseases and delivered from dangers by the saint’s intercession, in several of which cases he was an eye-witness. He testifies that he himself by having recourse to Felix had been speedily succored. St Augustine also has given an account of miracles performed at the shrine. It was not formerly allowed to bury any corpse within the walls of cities, and as the church of St Felix stood outside the walls of Nola many Christians sought to be buried in it, that their faith and devotion might recommend them after death to the patronage of this holy confessor. On this matter St Paulinus consulted St Augustine, who answered him by his book On the Care for the Dead, in which he shows that the faith and devotion of such persons would serve them well after death, as the suifrages and good works of the living in behalf of the faithful departed are profitable to the latter.

As already stated, the poems of St Paulinus constitute our main authority for the life of St Felix. Of these poems Bede wrote a summary in prose, which is printed, with other documents, in the Acta Sanctorum for January 14. In the Analecta Bollandiana, vol. xvi (1897), pp. 22 seq., may be found a curious illustration of the confusion introduced by the martyrologist Ado, and other hagiographers, through their invention of a “St Felix in Pincis”. This confusion was probably due to the existence of a church on the Pincio at Rome dedicated to St Felix of Nola. Pope St Damasus pays a tribute in verse to Felix for a cure he himself had received. Cf. Quentin, Les Martyrologes historiques, pp. 518—522.

Son of Hermias a Syrian Roman soldier born on his father's estate at Nola near Naples, Italy. On the death of his father, Felix distributed his inheritance to the poor, was ordained by Bishop St. Maximus of Nola, and became his assistant.
When Maximus fled to the mountains to escape the persecution of Decius, Felix was arrested and beaten for his faith instead. Legend says he was freed by an angel so he could help his sick bishop. Felix hid Maximus from soldiers in a vacant building. When the two were safely inside, a spider quickly spun a web over the door, fooling the imperial forces into thinking it was long abandoned, and they left without finding the Christians. The two managed to hide from authorities until the persecution ended with the death of Decius in 251.
Even after Decius' death in 251, Felix was a hunted man but kept well hidden until the persecution ended. When Maximus died, the people unanimously selected Felix as their Bishop, but he declined the honor in favor of Quintus, a senior priest. Felix spent the rest of his life on a small piece of land sharing what he had with the poor, and died there on January 14.

His tomb soon became famous for the miracles reported there, and when St. Paulinus became bishop of Nola almost a century later (410), he wrote about his predecessor, the source of our information about him, adding legendary material that had grown up about Felix in the intervening century.

happy ( = Felix)
Patronage against eye disease; against eye trouble; against false witness; against lies; against perjury; domestic animals; eyes
Representation cobweb; deacon in prison; spiderweb; young priest carrying an old man (Maximus) on his shoulders; young priest chained in prison with a pitcher and potsherds near him; young priest with a bunch of grapes (symbolizes his care of the aged Maximus); young priest with a spider; young priest with an angel removing his chains

St. Felix of Nola lived in Italy in the days of the Roman persecutions.  He survived, however, and went on to earn his crown as one of the early Christian ascetics.
     What we know about him comes mostly from St. Paulinus of Nola, bishop of the diocese of Nola a century later, who wrote many poems in praise of Felix.  Some of the biographical details may well be folkloric, but here is the basic outline of his priestly career.
     A native of Nola, near Naples, Felix was the second son of a Syrian-born father.  His brother joined the imperial army.  Felix, however, found his joy (the name "Felix" means "happy") in the service of the Lord.  Having given his belongings to the poor, he was ordained a priest by St. Maximus, the then bishop of Nola.
     Now, in the year 250, Roman Emperor Decius launched a thorough persecution of Christians.  Bishop Maximus, knowing that he was marked for death, followed the scriptural admonition and went into hiding, entrusting the diocesan administration to Felix.  The Roman constables, failing to discover the bishop, took out their frustration on his administrator.  They scourged Felix viciously and then jailed him in a cell that was in itself an instrument of torture.
     One night, however, an angel appeared to Father Felix and commanded him to go to his bishop, since he was gravely ill.  Thereupon the priest's shackles fell off and the door of his prison came unlocked.  Hastening to Maximus's side, Felix decided to carry him off on his shoulders to his home in Nola, where at the moment he could apparently escape detection.  There a kindly old woman nursed him back to health.
     Felix himself then had to take to flight, now to one hideout, now to another, ever pursued by government agents.  One day as they drew near, he managed to crawl into a hole in a ruined wall.  There he was protected by spiders much as Jesus was during the flight into Egypt, according to the old legend.  No sooner had he entered the hiding place when the spiders quickly wove a screen of cobwebs across the opening.  The pursuers saw the hole, but passed on.  Nobody could be inside, they concluded, because the web was intact.
     The priest of Nola was living in a dry well when Decius' persecution was called off.  Maximus died soon afterward, and his flock agreed as one man that Felix should succeed him as bishop.  Felix declined the office, however, and persuaded the people to accept Quintus, a senior priest of the diocese.  He could now have pressed the government to restore his personal property that it had confiscated, yet he did not take that step, because it contradicted his ideal of poverty.  Retaining only a small plot of land, he set up a sort of hermitage, cultivating the land and sharing its produce with the needy.  His constant practice was to give to the poor anything extra.  When a friend made him a present of a second coat, for instance, he would give away the better garment and retain the inferior one.  Sometimes, indeed, he gave a pauper his own good suit and donned the pauper's rags.  Having thus led a life of joyous self-denial, he was hailed at his death as unquestionably a saint.
     The tomb of Felix at Nola became the focus of international pilgrimage.  When Paulinus was installed as bishop of Nola many decades later, miracles were still being wrought at the saint's shrine.  Some of the wonders he recorded in his writings he himself had witnessed.  Many Christians chose to be buried close to Felix's tomb, hoping that they might have a better chance of mounting to heaven if they were near him at the resurrection.
     Paulinus meanwhile became a bit worried about the theology of the intercessory power of the saints.  How could they know, he asked St. Augustine, that we on earth were praying to them?  The great theologian calmed his fears.  God, he says, reveals to them that we are asking their intercession.  Then they turn to God to pray on our behalf.
     Whether we pray, then, to St. Felix or to any others who live in God's presence, we may be sure that the message gets through!               --Father Robert F. McNamara
340 St. Macrina the Elder Grandmother of Sts. Basil and Gregory of Nyssa
 Neocæsaréæ, in Ponto, sanctæ Macrínæ, discípulæ beáti Gregórii Thaumatúrgi, et áviæ sancti Basilíi, quæ eúndem Basilíum educávit in fide.
      At Neocaesarea in Pontus, St. Macrina, disciple of St. Gregory the Wonder-Worker, and grandmother of St. Basil, whom she educated in the Christian faith.

340 ST MACRINA THE ELDER, WIDOW
IN more than one of his letters St Basil the Great refers to his father’s mother, Macrina, by whom he was apparently brought up, and to whose care in giving him sound religious instruction he attributes the fact that he never imbibed any hetero­dox opinions which he had afterwards to modify.

During the persecution of Galerius and Maximinus, Macrina and her husband had much to suffer. They were forced to quit their home and to hide themselves from the persecutors among the hill forests of Pontus for seven years. They often suffered hunger, and St Gregory Nazianzen declares that at times they had to depend for their food upon the wild creatures which, as he believed, by some miraculous interposition of Providence suffered themselves to be caught and killed. Even after this danger had passed, another persecution broke out in which their goods were confiscated, and it would seem that they were honoured by a formal recognition of their title to be reckoned among the confessors of the faith. Macrina survived her husband, but the exact date of her death is not recorded. In the Roman Martyrology St Macrina is described as a disciple of St Gregory Thaumaturgus, but this can hardly mean more than that she was an earnest student of his writings.

See Acta Sanctorum for January 14 and DCB., vol. iii, p. 779.

She was trained in the faith by St. Gregory Thaumaturgis. During the persecution instituted by Emperor Diocletian, Macrina and her husband had to flee Neocaesarea, in Pontus. They lived on the shores of the Black Sea.

Macrina the Elder, Widow (RM) Died at Neocaesarea, c. 340. Saint Macrina was mother to Saint Basil the Elder and grandmother of Saint Basil, Saint Macrina the Younger, Saint Gregory of Nyssa, and Saint Peter of Sebastea. During her youth her spiritual director was Saint Gregory Thaumaturgus.

As if this isn't enough to qualify anyone to be a saint, Macrina was known for her great sense of justice and the faith with which she and her husband endured their sufferings during the persecutions under Galerius. During the persecution of Diocletian she and her husband were forced to remain in hiding in Pontus on the shores of the Black Sea for six or more years. They had much to suffer--hunger, deprivation, loss of property--then and under later persecutions. Nevertheless, they succeeded in rearing up one of the most saintly families in Cappadocia and, perhaps, in Christendom (Attwater, Benedictines, Delaney, Encyclopedia, Farmer).

In art, Saint Macrina is portrayed as a recluse with two stags near her or with two hinds (Roeder).
309 Martyrs Monks of Mount Sinai slain by Bedouins.  
 In monte Sina sanctórum trigínta octo Monachórum, a Saracénis ob Christi fidem interfectórum.
       On Mount Sinai, thirty-eight holy monks killed by the Saracens for the faith of Christ.

THE MARTYRS OF MOUNT SINAI
THIRTY-EIGHT solitaries on Mount Sinai were put to death by a troop of Arabians, and many other hermits in the desert of Raithu, two days’ journey from Sinai, near the Red Sea, were similarly massacred by the Blemmyes. Also many anchorets on Mount Sinai were martyred by a band of desert marauders at the close of the fourth century. A boy of fourteen years of age led among them an ascetic life of great perfection. The raiders threatened to kill him if he did not discover where the older monks had concealed themselves. He answered that death did not terrify him, and that he could not ransom his life by a sin in betraying his fathers. The barbarians, enraged at this answer, fell on him with all their weapons at once, and the youth died by as many martyrdoms as he had executioners. St Nilus (cf. November 12) left an account of this massacre: at that time he led an eremitical life in that wilderness.
These holy solitaries are commemorated together on this day in the Eastern church, and are mentioned in the Roman Martyrology. See Martynov, Annus Ecclesiasticus Graeco-Slavicus, pp. 41 seq.; Nilles, Kalendarium Manuale (1896—1897), vol. i. The narratives of St Nilus are in Migne, PG., vol. lxxix, pp. 590—694. On the authorship of these narratives see Analecta Bollandiana, vol. xxxviii (1920), pp. 420 seq.; and cf. Delehaye, Synax. Const., pp. 389—391.

Monks on Mt. Sinai who were slain by Bedouins. A second group, slain by Bedouins in the nearby Raithu Desert, is also commemorated.
Isaias, Sabas & Companions MM (RM). Thirty-eight monks on Mount Sinai massacred by pagan Arabs. These massacre was followed by several others in the neighborhood of the Red Sea (Benedictines).
335 Saint Nino, Enlightener of Georgia and Equal of the Apostles
Born around the year 280 in the city of Kolastra in Cappadocia. Her father Zabulon was related to the holy Great Martyr George (April 23). He came from an illustrious family, and pious parents, and he was highly regarded by the emperor Maximian (284-305). Zabulon, a Christian, served in the military under the emperor, and he took part in the liberation of Christian captives from Gaul (modern France). St Nino's mother, Susanna, was a sister of the Patriarch of Jerusalem. [Translator's note: In 1996, the parents of St Nino were numbered among the Saints.The commemoration of Sts Zabulon and Susanna is May 20].

When she was twelve years old, St Nino went to Jerusalem with her parents, who had only this one daughter. By their mutual consent and with the blessing of the Patriarch, Zabulon devoted his life to the service of God at the Jordan, and Susanna was made a deaconness in the church of the Holy Resurrection. The upbringing of St Nino was entrusted to the pious Eldress, Nianphora. St Nino displayed diligence and obedience for two years. By the grace of God, she got into the firm habit of fulfilling the rule of prayer, and reading the Holy Scriptures.

Once, while tearfully reading the Gospel passages describing the Crucifixion of Christ the Savior, she wondered about the fate of the Chiton (Tunic) of the Lord (John 19:23-24). When St Nino asked where the Lord's Chiton (Tunic) had gone (October 1), the Eldress Nianphora declared that the Lord's incorrupt Chiton had been carried off by the Rabbi Eleazar of Mtskhet and taken back with him to a place named Iberia (Georgia), and called the appanage (i.e., the "allotted portion") of the Mother of God. During Her earthly life, the All-Pure Virgin had received Georgia as her allotted portion, but an angel of the Lord appeared to Her and foretold that Georgia would become Her earthly portion only after Her Repose. She was told that Mt. Athos (also called the portion of the Mother of God) would be given to Her by God.

The Elderess Nianphora told her that Georgia had not yet been enlightened by the light of Christianity, St Nino entreated the Most Holy Theotokos to grant that she would see Georgia converted to Christ, and might also enable her to find the Tunic of the Lord.

The Queen of Heaven heard the prayer of the young righteous one. Once, when St Nino was resting after long prayer, the All-Pure Virgin appeared to her in a dream, and entrusting her with a cross plaited from sprigs, She said, "Take this cross, for it will be for you a shield and protection against all enemies both visible and invisible. Go to the land of Iberia, proclaim there the Gospel of the Lord Jesus Christ and spread forth His grace, and I will be your Protectress."

Awakening, St Nino saw the cross (now preserved in a special reliquary in the Tbilisi Zion cathedral church) in her hand. Rejoicing in spirit, she went to her uncle, the Patriarch of Jerusalem, and told him about her vision. The Patriarch then blessed the young virgin in her deed of Apostolic service.

On the way to Georgia, St Nino escaped martyrdom, which however befell her companions: the emperor's daughter Ripsimia, her guide Gaiania and thirty-five virgins (September 30), who had fled to Armenia from Rome to escape persecution under the emperor Diocletian (284-305). Bolstered in spirit by visions of an angel of the Lord, who appeared the first time holding a censer, and a scroll the second time, St Nino continued on her way and arrived in Georgia in the year 319. News of her soon spread through the area of Mtskhet, where she lived in asceticism. Numerous miracles accompanied her preaching. On the Feast of the Transfiguration of the Lord, as pagan priests offered sacrifice in the presence of the emperor Mirian and a multitude of the people, the idols Armaz, Gatsi, and Gaim were toppled from a high mountain through the prayers of St Nino. This was accompanied by a strong storm.

Entering Mtskhet, the ancient capital of Georgia, St Nino found shelter in the household of a childless imperial official, whose wife Anastasia was delivered from infertility through the prayers of St Nino, and she came to believe in Christ.

St Nino healed the Georgian empress Nana from a grievous infirmity. After her Baptism, she ceased to worship idols and became a zealous Christian instead (October 1). In spite of the miraculous healing of his wife, the emperor Mirian (265-342), in view of the complaints of the pagans, prepared to subject St Nino to fierce tortures. "At that very moment, when they plotted to execute the righteous one, the sun darkened and an impenetrable mist covered the place where the emperor was."

The emperor suddenly fell blind, and seized by terror, his retainers began to beg their pagan idols for the light to return. "But Armaz, Gaim and Gatsi were deaf, and the darkness only intensified. Then with one voice they cried out to the God of Nino. Instantly, the darkness was lifted, and the sun shone in all its radiance." This event occurred on May 6, 319.

Emperor Mirian, healed from his blindness by St Nino, was baptized with all his retainers. By 324, Christianity had established itself in Georgia.

The Chronicles relate that through her prayers, the location of the Lord's Chiton was revealed to St Nino. At this place the first Christian church was built in Georgia (at first a wooden church, but then a stone cathedral, in honor of the Twelve Holy Apostles, the "Svetitskhoveli").

At the request of the emperor Mirian, and with the cooperation of the Byzantine emperor St Constantine (306-337), Bishop Eustathius of Antioch was sent to Georgia with two priests and three deacons. Christianity took a definite hold upon the land. The mountain regions of Georgia, however, remained without enlightenment.

St Nino traveled with the presbyter James and one of the deacons, to the upper regions of the Aragva and Iori Rivers, where she preached the Gospel to the people. Many of them came to believe in Christ and receivedholy Baptism. Then St Nino proceeded to Kakhetia (Eastern Georgia) and settled in the village of Bodbe, in a small tent beside a mountain. Here she led an ascetic life of constant prayer, and converting the local inhabitants to Christ. Amidst all these was the empress of Kakhetia, named Sodzha [Sophia], who accepted Baptism with all her court and a multitude of the people.

Having completed her apostolic service in Georgia, St Nino had a revelation from God of her impending end. In a letter to the emperor Mirian, she requested him to send Bishop John, so that he might prepare her for her final journey. Not only Bishop John did come, but also the emperor with all the clergy went to Bodbe, where many healings took place at the deathbed of St Nino. For the edification of the people who had come, and at the request of her disciples, St Nino told them of her life. This narration, written down by Solomia of Udzharm, has served as the basis of the Life of St Nino.

Having received the Holy Mysteries, St Nino instructed that her body be buried at Bodbe, and then she peacefully departed to the Lord in the year 335 (according to other sources, in the year 347, at the age of sixty-seven, after 35 years of apostolic labor).

The emperor, the clergy and the people, grieving over the death of St Nino, wished to transfer her relics to the Mtskhet cathedral church, but they were not able to remove the coffin of the ascetic from her chosen place of rest. The emperor Mirian laid the foundations of a church on this site in 342, and his son the emperor Bakur (342-364) completed and dedicated the church in the name of St Nino's relative, the holy Great Martyr George.

Later, a women's monastery dedicated to St Nino was founded at this place. The relics of the saint, concealed beneath a crypt at her command, were glorified by many miracles and healings. The Georgian Orthodox Church, with the consent of the Patriarchate of Antioch, designated St Nino the Enlightener of Georgia as Equal of the Apostles. She was numbered among the Saints, and her Feast was established as January 14, the day of her blessed repose.
346 St. Barbasymas bishop of Seleucia and Ctesiphon Martyr of Persia with 16 companions

346 SS. BARBASYMAS AND HIS COMPANIONS, MARTYRS
ST BARBASYMAS (Barbashemin) succeeded his brother St Sadoth in the metro-political see of Seleucia and Ctesiphon in 342. Being accused as an enemy to the Persian religion, he was apprehended with sixteen of his clergy by order of King Sapor II. The king, seeing that his threats made no impression, confined him in a loathsome dungeon, in which he was often tortured with scourgings and other atrocities, besides the continual discomfort of stench, filth, hunger and thirst. After eleven months the prisoners were again brought before the king. Their bodies were disfigured and their faces hardly recognizable. Sapor held out to the bishop a golden cup in which were a thousand gold coins, and besides this he promised him a governorship if he would suffer himself to be initiated in the rites of the sun. The saint replied that he could not answer the reproaches of Christ at the last day if he should prefer gold, or a whole empire, to His holy law; and that he was ready to die. He received his crown by the sword, with his companions, on January 14, 346 at Ledan in Huzistan.

St Maruthas, Bishop of Maiferkat, supposed to be the author of his acts, adds that Sapor, resolving to extinguish the Christian name in his empire, published a new edict, whereby he commanded everyone to be tortured and put to death who should refuse to worship the sun, fire and water, and to feed on the blood of living creatures. The see of Seleucia remained vacant twenty years, and innumerable martyrs watered Persia with their blood. St Maruthas was not able to recover their names, but has left us a lengthy panegyric of their heroic deeds, very devotional in tone, in which he prays to be speedily united with them in glory.

See Assemani, Acta martyrum orientalium, vol. i, pp. 111—116; but the Syriac text has been more correctly edited by Bedjan, Acta martyrum et sanctorum, vol. ii, pp. 296—303 Sozomen, Hist. Eccles., bk ii, c. 13; BHO., n. 33.

He was the bishop of Seleucia and Ctesiphon in 342. In that year he was arrested and tortured with sixteen of his priests in the persecution of Sassanid King Shapur II.
He was offered a cup filled with gold coins if he would worship the Persian god and refused. All of these martyrs were beheaded.

368  Sancti Hilárii, Epíscopi Pictaviénsis, Confessóris et Ecclésiæ Doctóris; qui prídie hujus diéi evolávit in cælum.
       St. Hilary, bishop of Poitiers, confessor and doctor of the Church, who entered heaven on the thirteenth day of this month.

368 ST HILARY, BISHOP OF POITIERS, DOCTOR OF THE CHURCH

ST AUGUSTINE, who often urges the authority of St Hilary against the Pelagians, styles him “the illustrious doctor of the churches”. St Jerome says that he was amost eloquent man, and the trumpet of the Latins against the Arians” and in another place, that “in St Cyprian and St Hilary, God had transplanted two fair cedars out of the world into His Church 

St Hilary was born at Poitiers, and his family was illustrious in Gaul. He himself testifies that he was brought up in idolatry, and gives us a detailed account of the steps by which God conducted him to a knowledge of the faith, He con­sidered, by the light of reason, that man, a moral and free agent, is placed in this world for the exercise of patience, temperance, and other virtues, which he saw must receive a recompense after this life. He ardently set about learning what God is, and quickly discovered the absurdity of polytheism, or a plurality of gods he was convinced that there can be only one God, and that He must be eternal, unchangeable, all-powerful, the first cause and author of all things. Full of these reflections, he met with the Christian scriptures, and was deeply impressed by that sublime description Moses gives of God in those words, so expressive of us self-existence, I AM WHO AM: and was no less struck with the idea of His supreme dominion, illustrated by the inspired language of the prophets. The reading of the New Testament completed his inquiries; and he learned from the first chapter of St John that the Divine Word, God the Son, is coeternal and consubstantial with the Father. Being thus brought to the knowledge of the faith, he received baptism when somewhat advanced in years.

Hilary had been married before his conversion, and his wife, by whom he had a daughter named Apra, was yet living when he was chosen bishop of Poitiers, about the year 350. He did all in his power to escape this promotion; but his humility only made the people more earnest in their choice; and, indeed, their expectations were not disappointed, for his eminent qualities shone forth so brilliantly as to attract the attention not only of Gaul, but of the whole Church. Soon after he was raised to the episcopal dignity he composed, before his exile, a commentary on the Gospel of St Matthew, which is still extant. That on the psalms he compiled after his banishment. From that time the Arian controversy chiefly employed his pen. He was an orator and poet. His style is lofty and noble, with much rhetorical ornament, somewhat studied and the length of his periods renders him sometimes obscure: St Jerome complains of his long and involved sentences and tragic manner—the old rhetorical tradition was not yet dead. St Hilary solemnly appeals to God that he accounted it the great work of his life to employ all his faculties to announce Him to the world, and to excite all men to the love of Him. He earnestly recommends beginning every action and discourse by prayer. He breathes a sincere and ardent desire of martyrdom, and discovers a soul fearless of death. He had the greatest veneration for truth, sparing no pains in its pursuit and dreading no dangers in its defence.

The Emperor Constantius and a synod at Milan in 355 required all bishops to sign the condemnation of St Athanasius. Such as refused to comply were banished, among whom were St Eusebius of Vercelli, Lucifer of Cagliari and St Dionysius of Milan. St Hilary wrote on that occasion his First Book to Constantius “, in which he entreated him to restore peace to the Church. He separated himself from the three Arian bishops in the West, Ursacius, Valens and Saturninus, and the emperor sent an order to Julian, surnamed afterwards the Apostate, who at that time commanded in Gaul, to enforce St Hilary’s immediate banishment into Phrygia. St Hilary went into exile about the middle of the year 356, as cheerfully as another would take a pleasure trip, and recked nothing of hardships, dangers or enemies, having a soul above the smiles and frowns of the world and his thoughts fixed only on God. He remained in exile for some three years, which time he employed in composing several learned works. The principal and most esteemed of these is that On the Trinity. The earliest Latin hymn-writing is associated with the name of Hillary of Poitiers.

The emperor, again interfering in the affairs of the Church, assembled a council of Arians, at Seleucia in Isauria, to neutralize the decrees of the Council of Nicaea. St Hilary, who had then passed three years in Phrygia, was invited thither by the semi-Arians, who hoped that he would be useful to their party in crushing those who adhered strictly to the doctrine of Anus. But no human considerations could daunt his courage. He boldly defended the decrees of Nicaea, till at last, tired out with controversy, he withdrew to Constantinople and presented to the emperor a request, called his Second Book to Constantius “, begging permission to hold a public disputation about religion with Saturninus, the author of his banishment. The issue of this challenge was that the Arians, dreading such a trial, persuaded the emperor to rid the East of a man who never ceased to disturb its peace. Constan­tius accordingly sent him back into Gaul in 360.

St Hilary returned through Illyricum and Italy to confirm the weak. He was received at Poitiers with great demonstrations of joy, and there his old disciple, St Martin, ere long rejoined him. A synod in Gaul, convoked at the instance of Hilary, condemned that of Rimini in 359; and Saturninus, proving obstinate, was excommunicated and desposed. Scandals were removed, discipline, peace and purity of faith were restored. The death of Constantius in 361 put an end to the Arian persecution. St Hilary was by nature the gentlest of men, full of courtesy and friendliness to all: yet seeing this behaviour ineffectual, he composed an invective against Constantius in which he employed the severest language, probably for good reasons not now known to us. This piece was not circulated till after the death of the emperor. Hilary undertook a journey to Milan in 364 to confute Auxentius, the Arian usurper of that see, and in a public disputation obliged him to confess Christ to be the true God, of the same substance and divinity with the Father. St Hilary, indeed, saw through his hypocrisy; but Auxentius so far imposed on the Emperor Valentinian as to pass for orthodox. Hilary died at Poitiers, probably in the year 368, but neither the year nor the day of the month can be determined with certainty. The Roman Martyrology names his feast on January 14. St Hilary was proclaimed a doctor of the Church by Pope Pius IX in 1851.

A great deal has been written about St Hilary in recent years, but nothing has come to light which would gainsay the substantial accuracy of Alban Butler’s account, given above in a shortened form. The most important discovery, now generally accepted, is that of A. Wilmart (Revue Bénédictine, vol. xxiv (1908), pp. 159 seq. and 293 seq.). He shows that the text printed in “The First Book to Constantius” is miscalled and incomplete. It consists in reality, partly of a section of the letter addressed to the emperors by the Council of Sardica, partly of extracts from Hilary’s work written in 356, just before his exile, under the title of  “A First Book against Valens and Ursacius” (the Arian bishops). It also seems clear that a work of Hillary’s, Liber or Tractatus Mysteriorum, supposed to be lost, has not completely perished. A large part of it was found, along with some poems or hymns of the saint, in a manuscript at Arezzo in 1887. This Tractatus has nothing to do with the liturgy, as was previously conjectured, but is identical with a supposed Liber Officiorum otherwise attributed to him (see Wilmart in Revue Bénédictine, vol. xxvii (1910), pp. 12 seq.). A full statement and bibliography of these new developments will be found in Fr Le Bachelet’s article on St Hilary in DTC., vol. vi, cc. 2388 seq. Other valuable contributions to the subject have been made by A. Feder in the Sitzungsberichte of the Vienna Academy, Phil.-­Histor. Xl., clxii, no. 4, and in the texts he edited for the Corpus Scrip. Eccles. Lat. So far as regards the life of St Hillary we have a biography and collection of miracles by Venantius Fortunatus printed in the Acta Sanctorum for January 13 (cf. BHL., nn. .580—582) see also

400 Saint Theodulus was the son of St Nilus the Faster Lord saved the boy through the prayers of his father.
(November 12), and he recorded the slaughter of the holy Fathers at Raithu in the fifth century. While still a child, St Theodulus left the world and went to Mount Sinai with his father.

During a barbarian assault on the desert dwellers, the saint fell into the hands of brigands, who decided to offer the youth as a sacrifice to the morning dawn, which they worshipped in place of God. But the Lord saved the boy through the prayers of his father, St Nilus. The barbarians slept past sunrise, and giving up on the idea of making him a sacrificial offering, they took the youth with them.

Brought by the brigands to the city of Eluza, St Theodulus was ransomed by the local bishop, in whose house he was later found by his grateful father. Blessed by the bishop and presbyters, Sts Theodulus and Nilus returned to Mount Sinai, where they served the Lord until the end of their days. Their incorrupt relics were transferred to Constantinople under Emperor Justin the Younger (565-578) and placed in the church of the holy Apostles at Orphanotrophia.

552 St. Datius Bishop of Milan, Italy , exiled by the Arian Ostrogoths probably from 530
 Medioláni sancti Dátii, Epíscopi et Confessóris; cujus méminit beátus Gregórius Papa.
       At Milan, St. Datius, bishop and confessor, mentioned by pope St. Gregory.

552 ST DATIUS, BISHOP OF MILAN
THE life of St Datius was spent in stormy times. During the greater part of his episcopate—which lasted at least from 530 to 552—he was engaged in strife, sometimes in defence of temporal, more often in championing spiritual, interests. To save his city of Milan from the Goths he had allied himself with Belisarius. Unfortunately he was disappointed in his hopes. Before help could come from Belisarius, Milan was invested and eventually sacked. It is possible that Datius himself was taken prisoner, and afterwards liberated through the influence of his friend Cassiodorus. Driven from Milan the bishop betook himself to Constan­tinople, where, in 545, he boldly supported Pope Vigilius against Justinian in the controversy concerning the “Three Chapters”. He seems to have died in 552, while still at Constantinople, whence his remains were at a later date translated to his episcopal city of Milan. Pope St Gregory the Great in his Dialogues recounts a curious story of a haunted house from which the devil used to frighten all intending occupants, by producing the most alarming and discordant howlings of beasts. St Datius, however, showed no fear, but put the aggressor to shame and restored perfect quiet.
See the Acta Sanctorum for January 14; DCB., vol. i, p. 789; and L. Duchesne, L’Eglise au Vie siècle, pp. 197—199.
When Milan was attacked by the Goths, General Belisarius of Constantinople, failed to aid the city. It is believed Datius was taken prisoner for a time but was freed by his friend Cassiodorus. He went to Constantinople to support Pope Vigilius against Emperor Justinian in the Three Chapter Controversy of 545 . He probably died there.
610 Saint Kentigern (meaning "head chief") of Glasgow B "Mungo" (meaning "dear one") (AC)
(also known as Mungo)
Died c. 603-612; Farmer lists feast day as January 13. Most of what we know about Saint Kentigern mixes fact and fiction, because the only sources date from the 11th and 12th centuries. Many of the folkloric elements predate the written documents.

603 ST KENTIGERN, OR MUNGO, BISHOP IN STRATHCLYDE
IF we may trust our sources, St Kentigern’s mother, Thaney (Thenew, Tenoi; cf. “St Enoch’s” station at Glasgow) was of royal birth and, being discovered to be with child, of which the father was unknown, was sentenced to be hurled from the top of a precipitous hill (Traprain Law in Haddingtonshire). She escaped, however, without injury, and was then put into a coracle and cast adrift at the mouth of the Firth of Forth. The tide eventually carried her to Culross, on the opposite shore of the estuary, where she brought forth her child, and where St Serf took both mother and babe under his protection. The boy became very dear to him, and was given the pet name Mungo (= darling). When he had grown up, Kentigern felt himself drawn to a life of solitude and self-denial, and he accordingly retired to a place called “Glasghu”, now Glasgow. There after a while a com­munity gathered round him, and the fame of his virtues spread, so that in the end the clergy and people of that district would have no other for their bishop; and he was consecrated by a bishop from Ireland. St Kentigern travelled everywhere on foot, preaching the gospel to his people; he practised the severest austerities, and recited the whole psalter every day, often standing immersed the while in the water of some ice-cold stream. During Lent he always withdrew from the company of his fellow-men, and in some desert spot gave himself up entirely to penance and prayer. This apostolic way of life was blessed, we are told, by many miracles.

The political conditions of this great tract of country, which was later known as Strathclyde and stretched southwards as far as the Ribble, were terribly unstable. The chieftains were constantly engaged in feuds among themselves, and although they recognized some sort of “king”, or supreme authority, plots and cabals were constantly being formed against him. The sequence of events, with such slender and contradictory data as we possess, is impossible to determine, but it is said that Kentigern was eventually driven into exile or flight. He made his way into Wales, where he is said to have stayed for a time with St David at Menevia, till Cadwallon, a chieftain in Denbighshire, bestowed on him the land near the meeting of the rivers Elwy and Clwyd, on which he built a monastery, called from the former of the two rivers Llanelwy, where a number of disciples and scholars put themselves under his direction, among them St Asaph. It is to be noted, however, that some Welsh historians deny that Kentigern founded this abbey, now represented by the cathedral church of Saint Asaph, or even that he was ever there; and, indeed, while Asaph’s name is common in the toponymy of the district, that of Kentigern is unknown.

Later he returned to the north, and when he again reached Strathclyde Kentigern for a while settled at Hoddam in Dumfriesshire, but before long took up his abode at Glasgow as before. His austerity of life and zeal for the spread of the Gospel continued unabated, and his biographer tells us that on one occasion a meeting took place between him and that other great apostle of Scotland, St Columba, with whom he exchanged croziers. Many extravagant miracles are recounted of Kentigern, one of which is especially famous, as the memory of it is perpetuated by the ring and the fish seen in the arms of the city of Glasgow. King Rydderch found a ring, which he had given to his queen as a love-token, upon the finger of a sleeping knight whom she favoured. He removed it without awakening the sleeper, threw it into the sea, and then asked his wife to produce the ring he had given her. In her distress she applied to St Kentigern, and he sent a monk out to fish, who caught a salmon which had swallowed the ring. A curious description of the death of the saint in the act of taking a hot bath on the octave of the Epiphany, “on which day he had been accustomed to baptize a multitude of people”, seems certainly to point to some more primitive source which the  biographer had before him. The date of his death seems to have been 603, when Kentigern will have been eighty-five——not, as his biographer states, 185—years old.

His feast is kept throughout Scotland as the first bishop of Glasgow, and also in the dioceses of Liverpool, Salford, Lancaster and Menevia.

See A. P. Forbes, Lives of St Ninian and St Kentigern (1874), who prints the text of Joscelyn of Furness and of the incomplete anonymous life; also his Kalendars of Scottish Saints (1872), pp. 362 seq.; Skene, Celtic Scotland, vol. ii, pp. 179 seq. Cf. also the Acta Sanctorum, January 13; and A. W. Wade-Evans, Life of Saint David (1923), pp. 109 seq. Forbes’s KSS. is the most useful reference for the little that is known of the lesser Scottish saints in whose honour Catholic churches are still dedicated, e.g. Cumin (at Morar), Quivox (Prestwick), Triduana (Edinburgh), Machan (Lennoxtown). But see also M. Barrett, A Calendar of Scottish Saints (1904). D. D. C. Pochin Mould’s Scotland of the Saints (1952) is useful for Scottish saints in general.
Kentigern is said to have been a native of Lothian, the son of Saint Thenaw (Thaney, Thenog, Theneva), a British princess, and the grandson of, perhaps, Prince Urien. When it was learned that she was pregnant by an unknown man, she was hurled from a cliff (in a cart at times) and, when discovered alive at the foot of the cliff, set adrift in a boat (or barrel) on the Firth of Forth. She reached Culross, was sheltered by Saint Serf, and gave birth to a child to whom Serf gave the name Mungo (darling). The legend continues that Kentigern was raised by the saint, became a hermit at Glasghu (Glasgow) and was so renowned for his holiness that he was consecrated bishop of Strathclyde about 540 by an Irish bishop. There is reason to believe that he actually began his missionary efforts at Cathures on the Clyde, thus founding the church at Glasgow, and continued his missionary activities in Cumbria generally. He was, indeed, the first bishop of Strathclyde. During his bishopric, he revived the cultus of Saint Ninian and restored his church in Glasgow. His mother gave her name to Saint Enoch's Square and Railway Station in that city.

It is further related that political disorder drove him into exile in Carlisle and then into Wales, where he is said to have stayed with Saint David at Menevia. Reputedly he also founded the monastery of Llanelwy, being succeeded as abbot there by Saint Asaph when he was recalled to the north by the Christian King Rederech around 553; but the evidence for these particulars is altogether insufficient. In the north again he is said to have lived at Hoddam (Dumfries) and Glasgow, where the saint died while taking a bath (an odd bit of trivia). He was buried in Glasgow cathedral.

Mungo (Munghu) is a Celtic nickname commonly used for Kentigern; it is usually explained as meaning 'darling' or 'most dear,' but this is questionable. Montague states that Kentigern was probably Irish because "his nickname Mungo is compounded with the prefix 'Mo,' a purely Irish custom."

The ring and fish displayed on the heraldic arms of the city of Glasgow refer to a legend about Saint Kentigern, in which he miraculously saves an unfaithful wife from the anger of her royal husband. The queen had given her husband's ring to her lover. The king discovered it, threw it into the sea and told his wife she must find it again in three days. Kentigern told her not to worry: One of his monks had extracted the ring from a salmon he caught.

There are several Scottish and nine English, mainly Cumbrian, dedications to the saint under his moniker, Mungo. Although it is unlikely that Kentigern founded the 1,000-monk monastery in northern Wales, the story may be true that he traded pastoral staffs with Saint Columba near the end of Columba's life (Attwater, Benedictines, Delaney, Encyclopedia, Farmer, Montague).

In art Saint Kentigern is represented as an enthroned bishop with a monk at his feet presenting a salmon with a ring in its mouth; a queen with a ring and a king with a sword are near him. At times he may be portrayed meeting Saint Columba with a column of fire above him; or holding a mulberry leaf (Roeder).

Saint Kentigern is venerated at Carlisle and Saint Asaph. Together with his mother, Kentigern is the patron of Glasgow (Roeder).

Saint Kentigern was from Lothian (in Scotland), and may have been of royal blood. He left home at an early age and was brought up by a hermit named Servan (July 1) on the Firth of Forth. It was St Servan who gave him the name Mungo (or dear friend).  St Kentigern Mungo labored in Strathclyde, and founded a monastery where the city of Glasgow stands today. He was made a bishop, taking Glasgow for his See.  Driven from Scotland by the enmity of a local ruler, St Kentigern went to Wales and founded the monastery of St Asaph. Eventually, he returned to Scotland and resumed his missionary work, baptizing many people.
In 584 he met St Columba (June 9), and exchanged croziers with him. St Kentigern was a strict ascetic who traveled everywhere on foot. It is believed that he died in Glasgow around 612 at the age of eighty-five. A Gothic cathedral was built over his shrine in the thirteenth century.

(518c.-603 A.D.)
     The cathedral of Glasgow, in western Scotland, no longer in Catholic hands but begun in the 12th century, bears the odd-sounding name of "St. Mungo". Actually, this saint's name was Kentigern (meaning "head chief"). "Mungo" (meaning "dear one") was a nickname given to him when he was young, and it stuck as an alternative. St. Kentigern/Mungo was the first bishop of Glasgow on the River Clyde. Today it is a large bustling city.
     Although Kentigern was definitely the first prelate to rule the Glasgow district, his biography is a mixture of few facts and much legend. Considering that he was contemporary with the legendary King Arthur of Wales, it should be no surprise that Mungo, too, was a somewhat fabulous figure.
     Kentigern was born, it is said, in the county of Fife, above Edinburgh, in eastern Scotland. The tale goes that his mother was of royal blood, but having been discovered to be with child by an unknown father, she was condemned to be thrown off a precipice. Having survived that supposedly lethal ordeal, she was put into a skin-covered coracle and set afloat in the Firth of Forth. Providentially, again, she landed safely at Culross, where her son was born. A saint called Serf who lived at Culross, took the mother and child under his protection.
     On growing up, Kentigern/Mungo decided to become a hermit. He settled in a solitude called "Glasgu" on the banks of the River Clyde. As happened so often in history, other hermits joined him there so he founded a monastery. Soon layfolk came to build their homes around the monastery. Thus Mungo really can be said to have founded Glasgow. When the time had come for them to have a bishop, all the inhabitants of Glasgu insisted that he be the man.
     Mungo was an apostolic bishop, though still a hermit monk in spirit. (He was true to the harsh Celtic penitential tradition. It is said, for instance, that he would recite all the psalms every day, often as he stood chest-high in the waters of a cold stream.) He trudged through all the Strathclyde area preaching the Gospel to both baptized and pagans.
     Unfortunately, the story continues, the bishop had to take flight into Wales for a while because of the feuds between the chieftains of Strathclyde. He finally worked his way back to Glasgow around 581. It is said that on one occasion he met with the great Irish apostle of Scotland, St. Columba. Before taking leave of each other, the two holy men exchanged crosiers as a sign of friendship.
     St. Kentigern all along had a reputation for miracle-working. One of the miracles recorded by popular tradition was that of the ring. King Rydderch, says the legend, had given a very special ring to his wife, but one time he found it on the finger of a sleeping knight. Suspecting his queen of infidelity, he took off the ring without disturbing its slumbering wearer, threw it into the sea, and then (like an early Othello) demanded that his wife show him his gift. The queen turned for help to St. Kentigern. Impressed by her claim of innocence, the bishop ordered one of his monks to go out and fish. This monk returned with a salmon; then when the fish was opened, lo and behold, the ring was found in its belly. Thus the queen was able to show it to her husband. Whether this tale is fact or fancy, it suggested the incorporation of a ring in the medieval coat-of-arms of the city of Glasgow.
     For all the romantic fantasy that clouds his true life-story, it is certain that St. Mungo was a strict ascetic, a devoted bishop, and a man well loved of God. That is why he is still honored in Glasgow, in the Welsh diocese of Menevia, and in the English dioceses of Salford and Lancaster, and is co-patron saint of the Archdiocese of Liverpool.--Father Robert F. McNamara
664 St. Deusdedit first Anglo-Saxon primate of England Benedictine archbishop of Canterbury
Benedictine archbishop of Canterbury, England. He was a Southern Saxon, originally called Freithona. In 653, Deusdedit succeeded Honorius, becoming the first Anglo-Saxon primate of England. He died, probably on October 28, during a plague.

8th v. Saint Stephen Impressed by the lives of the great asceticss glorious departure into Heaven with the angels
he made the rounds of many monasteries in Palestine, and in the wilderness visited also the great Fathers Euthymius the Great (January 20), Sava the Sanctified (December 5) and Theodosius the Great (January 11). Tonsured into monasticism, St Stephen founded his own monastery in Bithynia, near Mount Oxos near Chalcedon. Many monks gathered at the monastery near Moudania in Asia Minor, which was called "chenolakkos" ["by the goose-pond"].
The holy ascetic foresaw his own death, and certain of the brethren were granted to behold his glorious departure into Heaven with the angels.
St. Euphrasius A bishop martyred by the Vandals
or possibly a bishop who corresponded with St. Cyprian.

St. Felix A Roman priest
1180 Saint Lawrence O'Toole descendant of Irish petty kings love of one's native land is one phase of the love of neighbor that Jesus enjoined on us all
b. 1128
     Lawrence O'Toole (Lorcan O'Tuathail) was a descendant of Irish petty kings. When he was young, Dermot McMurrough, the maverick king of Leinster, raided Lawrence's father's lands and demanded the youth as a hostage. Only two years later was his father able to force Dermot to hand the son over to the bishop of Glendalough. The father, Murtagh, also asked the bishop to choose by lots one of his four sons, whom he intended to assign to a church career. Lawrence laughed. "No need for lots," he said, "It is my desire to have for my inheritance the service of God in the Church."
     Lawrence, slim, princely and attractive, did have a true vocation, and he became a model monk at the famous monastery of Glendalough. Indeed, he was chosen its abbot when only 25. He was even invited to become bishop of Glendalough in 1157, but he pointed out that he had not reached the proper age. In 1162, however, he did accept the miter as archbishop of Dublin. He was in for a stormy career.
     Dublin was a turbulent place in those days. It was practically under the control of half-pagan Danish settlers.  Archbishop Lawrence was a staunch reformer, which won him few friends. He established a rule of life for the clergy of his cathedral, and followed it strictly himself. At several local church councils he upheld the rights of the Church. He also went to Rome to take part in the reformist Third Council of the Lateran (1179). When he passed through England, King Henry II asked him to swear that while at Rome he would do nothing to infringe on the regal "rights" over the church in England and Ireland. Nevertheless, Lawrence was able to obtain from Pope Alexander II papal protection for the dioceses of the Dublin Province. The pope also named him papal legate to Ireland.
     This King Henry was, of course, the same whose encroachments on church rights had resulted in the martyrdom of St. 'Thomas Becket in 1170. Pope Adrian IV had granted him the right, in 1156, to hereditary possession of Ireland. In 1170-71 the king's Anglo-Norman aides invaded Ireland. Thus began the "Irish Question" which troubles Ireland to this day.
     Because of his talent and position, Archbishop O'Toole was involved in obtaining a treaty between Henry II and Rory O'Conor, the High King of Ireland. While in England, he made a pilgrimage to the shrine of St. Thomas Becket, Canterbury, canonized 1173. As he prayed, a madman, who thought it would be nice to make another martyr, fractured his skull with a club, but did not kill him. The king wanted the assailant executed, but Lawrence begged him not to do so. But in 1180, when the Archhbishop came to ask Henry for further concessions to King Rory, he was refused. Henry even forbade him to return to Ireland, feeling that he was too strong in his defense of Irish liberties. The archbishop followed Henry to France, hoping he might still persuade him. Henry did withdraw his command not to return to Ireland, but the archbishop died in Normandy on November 14, 1180. He left no will, for, as he explained, "I have not one penny under the sun to dispose of." His remains became an object of pilgrimage; and after many miracles had been reported there, he was canonized in 1226.
     St. Lawrence O'Toole, like St. Thomas of Canterbury, was a staunch defender of the rights of the Church. He was also opposed to the introduction into Ireland (through the treason of his old captor, King Dermot McMurrough) of an alien government and culture. This holy archbishop understood clearly that love of one's native land is one phase of the love of neighbor that Jesus enjoined on us all.

     -Father Robert F. McNamara
1200 BD ODO OF NOVARA He worked many miracles both during life and after death, but it horrified him to think that people should attribute to him any supernatural power.
BD Odo, a Carthusian monk of the twelfth century, stands out from among some of his saintly contemporaries by the fact that we have good first-hand evidence concerning his manner of life. Pope Gregory IX ordered an inquiry to be made with a view to his canonization, and the depositions of the witnesses are still preserved. One or two extracts will serve to sketch his portrait better than a narrative.

 “Master Richard, Bishop of Trivento, having been adjured in the name of the Holy Ghost, the holy Gospels lying open before him, affirmed that he had seen the blessed Odo and knew him to be a God-fearing man, modest and chaste, given up night and day to watching and prayer, clad only in rough garments of wool, living in a tiny cell, which he hardly ever quitted except to pray in the church, obeying always the sound of the bell when it called him to office. Without ceasing, he poured forth his soul in sighs and tears; there was no one he came across to whom he did not give new courage in the service of God; he constantly read the divine Scriptures, and in spite of his advanced age, as long as he stayed in his cell, he laboured with his hands as best he could that he might not fall a prey to idleness.”

The bishop then goes on to give a brief sketch of Odo’s life, noting that after he became a Carthusian he had been appointed prior in the recently founded monastery of Geyrach in Slavonia, but had there been so cruelly persecuted by the bishop of the diocese, Dietrich, that, being forced to leave his community, he had travelled to Rome to obtain the pope’s permission to resign his office. He had then been given hospitality by the aged abbess of a nunnery at Tagliacozzo, who, struck by his holiness, got leave to retain him as chaplain to the community. Numerous other witnesses, who had been the spectators of Odo’s edifying life, spoke of his austerities, his charity and his humble self-effacement.

One of these, the Archpriest Oderisius, deposes that he was present when Odo breathed his last, and that “as he lay upon the ground in his hair-shirt in the aforesaid little cell, he began to say, when at the point of death, ‘Wait for me, Lord, wait for me, I am coming to thee’; and when they asked him to whom he was speaking, he answered, ‘It is my King, whom now I see, I am standing in His presence.’ And when the blessed Odo spoke these words, just as if someone were offering him his hand, he stood straight up from the ground, and so, with his hands stretched out heavenwards, he passed away to our Lord.”

This happened on January 14 in the year 1200, when Odo was believed to be nearly a hundred years old. He worked many miracles both during life and after death, but it horrified him to think that people should attribute to him any supernatural power. “Brother”, he said to one who asked his aid, “why dost thou make game of me, a wretched sinner, a bag of putrid flesh ? Leave me in peace; it is for Christ, the Son of the living God, to heal thee”; and as he said this he burst into tears. But the man went away permanently cured of an infirmity which, as the witness who recounts this attests from personal knowledge, had tortured him for many years. The cultus of Bd Odo was confirmed in 1859.

See Le Couteulx, Annales Ordinis Cartusiensis (1888), vol. iii, pp. 263—271. In vol. iv, pp. 59—72, the editor prints a selection of the depositions of the witnesses to the miracles which were wrought at the tomb of Bd Odo. As the evidence was all given within a year of the occurrences related, it forms one of the best collections of medieval miracles preserved to us. The documents have been edited entire in the Analecta Bollandiana, vol. i (1882), pp. 323—354. Cf. also Le Vasseur, Ephemerides, vol. i, pp. 60—68.
1225 St. Sava patron of Serbia monk founded several monasteries translated religious works into Serbian.
1237 ST SAVA, ARCHBISHOP OF THE SERBS
THE public ecclesiastical life and politics of St Sava (i.e. Sabas) were to a great extent conditioned by political considerations, a circumstance common to many churchmen in history, and nowhere more acute than in the Balkans, at the junction of great civil and ecclesiastical powers and the meeting-place of diverse cultures.

Sava, born in 1174, was the youngest of the three sons of Stephen I, founder of the dynasty of the Nemanydes and of the independent Serbian state. At the age of seventeen he became a monk on the Greek peninsula of Mount Athos, where he was joined by his father when that prince abdicated in 1196. Together they established a monastery for Serbian monks, with the name of Khilandari, which is still in existence as one of the seventeen “ruling monasteries” of the Holy Mountain. As abbot, Sava was noted for his light and effective touch in training young monks; it was remarked, too, that his influence was always on the side of gentleness and leniency. He began the work of translating books into the Serbian language, and there are still treasured at Khilandari a psalter and ritual written out by himself, and signed, “I, the unworthy lazy monk Sava”.

In the meanwhile his brothers, Stephen II and Vulkan, had fallen out over their inheritance, and in 1207 St Sava returned home. Religiously as well as civilly he found his country in a bad way. The Serbs had been Christians for some time, but much of it was a nominal Christianity, quite uninstructed and mixed up with heathenism. The clergy were few and mostly uneducated, for the church had been ruled from Constantinople or Okhrida in Bulgaria, whose hierarchs had shown little care or sympathy for those whom they regarded as barbarians. So St Sava, following the example of the Benedictines in the West and the earlier Russian monks, utilized the monks who had accompanied him from Khilandari for pastoral and missionary work. He established himself at the monastery of Studenitsa, from whence he founded a number of small monasteries in places convenient for travelling around and getting to the people. But this did not mean that the former Athonite had changed his mind about the necessity of solitude and contemplation: there may still be seen in the Studenitsa valley, high and away above the monastery, the rocky hermitage to which St Sava himself used to retire.

What happened, and the order of what happened, subsequently is more difficult to assess, but the following represents a recent reading of the rather contradictory evidence. It remained desirable (and politically advantageous also) that the Serbs should have their own bishops. So Stephen II sent his brother to Nicaea, where the Eastern emperor and patriarch had taken refuge from the Frankish intruders at Constantinople. Sava won over the emperor, Theodore II Laskaris (who was related to the Nemanya family), and he designated Sava as the first metropolitan of the new hierarchy. The patriarch, Manuel I, was unwilling, but in the circum­stances dared not oppose obstinately, and himself ordained Sava bishop, in 1219. Sava returned by way of Mount Athos, bringing with him more monks and many books that had been translated at Khilandari, and straightway set about the organ­ization of his church. It seems that already Stephen II, “the First-Crowned”, had asked to be recognized as king by Pope Honorius III and had been duly crowned by a papal legate in 1217. But in 1222 he was again crowned, by his brother as archbishop, and one source asserts that it was on this occasion that Honorius sent a crown, in response to a request from Sava, who had informed the Holy See of his own episcopal ordination.

Thus the retiring young prince, who had left home as a youth to be a monk, succeeded before he was fifty years of age in consolidating the state founded by his father by reforming the religious life of the people, giving them bishops of their own race, and sealing the sovereign dignity of his brother. St Sava is regarded as the patron-saint of Serbia and, with him as with others, the people’s gratitude attributes benefits for which he was very doubtfully responsible: in this case, how to turn a plow across the head-land instead of dragging it back to the starting point, and how to make windows instead of admitting air and light by the door (cf. the men of the Sussex coast who said that St Wilfrid taught them how to catch fish).

The later years of St Sava’s life were marked externally by two voyages to Palestine and the Near East; the first seems to have been a pilgrimage of devotion, the second an ecclesiastical mission. On his way back from this last he was taken ill at Tirnovo in Bulgaria and there he died, with a smile on his face, on January 14, 1237. In the following year his body was translated to the monastery of Milochevo in Serbia, where it rested until 1594 when, during civil disturbances, the relics were deliberately burned by a Turkish pasha who was an Italian renegade.

The Orthodox of Serbia look on St Sava not only as the founder of their national church but also as the conscious father of their separation from Rome. And indeed it would seem this might be so—if events are looked at from the position in later times. But the position in those days was quite different. Behind the ecclesiastical authorities of Rome and Nicaea-Byzantium and Okhrida were corre­sponding civil powers, all of them a threat to the nascent Serbian state. Among these King Stephen II and his archbishop had to move warily; and in any case schism between Rome and the Byzantine East was hardly definitive; Southern Slavs, and for that matter many “Franks”, did not yet know any hard-and-fast division into Catholic and Orthodox. In fact, St Sava Prosvtitely, “the Enlightener”, figures in several Latin calendars and his feast is also kept in the Catholic Byzantine diocese of Krizevtsy in Croatia.

A life of St Sava was written by his disciple Domitian about 1250, but it has not survived in its original form: it was edited during the fourteenth century, with “an obvious tenden­ciousness in a certain ecclesiastical direction” (i.e. in favour of the Orthodox) says Shafarik, who cannot be suspected of partiality for the Catholic Church. Other sources are the letters of Stephen II and the history of Salona by the contemporary Latin archdeacon of Spalato, Thomas. See Acta Sanctorum, January 14; J. Martynov, Trifolium Serbicum; J. Matl, “Der hI. Sava als Begründer der serbischen Nationalkirche”, in Kyrios, vol. ii (1937), pp. 23—37; V. Yanich and C. P. Hankey in Lives of the Serbian Saints; and a useful con­ference on Sava given in Belgrade by P. Bélard, printed in L’Unité de l’Eglise, no. 78 (1936). A seventeenth-century Latin bishop in Bosnia, I. T. Mrnavich, wrote a biography of St Sava, and the Franciscan poet Andrew Kachich devoted one of his best poems to him.

Sava was the son of Stephen I, founder of the Nemanydes dynasty, and also known as Sabas. He became a monk on Mount Athos in Greece when he was seventeen. With his father, who abdicated in 1196, he founded Khilandrai Monastery on Mount Athos for Serbian monks and became Abbot. He returned home in 1207 when his brothers, Stephen II and Vulkan, began to quarrel, and civil war broke out. Sava brought many of his monks with him, and from the headquarters he established at Studenitsa Monastery, he founded several monasteries and began the reformation and education of the country, where religion and education had fallen to a low estate. He was named metropolitan of a new Serbian hierarchy by Emperor Theodore II Laskaris at Nicaea; was consecrated, though for political reasons unwillingly, by Patriarch Manuel I in 1219; returned home bringing more monks from Mount Athos; and in 1222 crowned his brother Stephen II King of Serbia. Through his efforts, he finished the uniting of his people that had been begun by his father, translated religious works into Serbian, and gave his people a native clergy and hierarchy. He made a pilgrimage to the Holy Land, was later sent on a second visit there on an ecclesiastical mission, and died on the way back at Tirnovo, Bulgaria, on January 14. He is the patron of Serbia.
(1174-1237)
These lines were written when the Balkan states, which we had come to call Yugoslavia, were engaged in an anguished military struggle for political independence. War was not news for the Balkans. They seem to have been in constant strife, religious and political, from the Middle Ages on. The odd thing is that the majority of the Balkan peoples, whether Croatians or Serbs or Montenegrins, or even Albanians, whether Roman Catholic or Greek Orthodox or Moslems, are Slavs who moved into the Balkan area from the Ukraine area in the seventh century.
One of the largest of these Slavic groups is the Serbs. Although originally they were converted to Christianity by Italians, they were brought into the Byzantine rite and into Greek Orthodoxy through later contacts with Constantinople. A leading figure in their Christian organization was St. Sava, whom they acknowledge as their patron saint.
Sava was highborn, the third son of Stephen I, founder of the independent state of Serbia. Though a scion of a political family (and never quite able to escape political involvement), he nevertheless declared, at age 17, that he intended to become a monk. He went to the Byzantine monastic center on Mount Athos in Greece, and there was clothed in the monastic habit. Indeed, when his father Stephen abdicated his princedom five years later, he, too, joined his son in monastic life as a “second career”. Father and son then established on Mt. Athos a new monastery called Khilandari. It was for Serbian monks, and it still functions. Sava, made abbot of Khilandari, was not only a diligent translator of spiritual books into Serbian; he was also an able disciplinarian of his monks, noted for what he could achieve by gentleness and leniency.
Meanwhile, his brothers, Stephen II and Vulkan, had gotten into a fight over their inheritance. In 1207, therefore, Sava returned to Serbia. He found the Serbian morale low, spiritually as well as socially. He therefore decided to stay home and evangelize his countrymen, who were only nominally Christian. Choosing the monastery of Studenitsa as his center, he employed the services of the other monks who had traveled back to Khilandari with him to engage in pastoral and missionary work. To facilitate their labors, he established a number of smaller monasteries strategically located. Meantime, despite his more active career, the princely monk built for himself in the Studenitsa neighborhood a hermitage to which he could retire from time to time for a little monastic peace.
Sava's efforts succeeded in stabilizing the country politically. Rehabilitation also resulted in important religious developments. The Serbs set up their own church hierarchy, and through the influence of the Eastern emperor and the Patriarch of Constantinople, Sava was consecrated archbishop of Serbia. He supervised the Serbian church until his death thirty years later.
Because the Eastern Orthodox finally declared their independence of Rome, the Orthodox Serbs consider St. Sava not only the founder of their national church but the one who separated it from the Holy See. But the division of Eastern and Western Christianity was not yet fully accomplished in his day, at least in the Balkans. So St. Sava is venerated not only by the Serbian Orthodox but also by the Catholic diocese of the Greek Rite in Croatia, and by the local Latin Rite churches as well.
May prayers of St. Sava of Studenitsa obtain peace in his country & the reunion of the Churches east and west!--Father Robert F. McNamara
1237 BD ROGER OF TODI received the habit of the Friars Minor from the hands of the Seraphic Father himself in 1216, that he was appointed by St Francis to act as spiritual director to the community founded and governed by Bd Philippa Mareri at Rieti in Umbria under the rule of St Clare, that he assisted Philippa on her deathbed in 1236, and that he died himself at Todi shortly afterwards on January 5, 1237.
NOT much is recorded concerning Bd Roger (Ruggiero) da Todi, and in the little which is told us there seems to be a certain amount of confusion. What can be affirmed with confidence is that he received the habit of the Friars Minor from the hands of the Seraphic Father himself in 1216, that he was appointed by St Francis to act as spiritual director to the community founded and governed by Bd Philippa Mareri at Rieti in Umbria under the rule of St Clare, that he assisted Philippa on her deathbed in 1236, and that he died himself at Todi shortly afterwards on January 5, 1237. Pope Gregory IX, who had known him personally, permitted the town of Todi, where his remains were enshrined, to keep a feast in his honour, and Benedict XIV confirmed the cultus for the whole Franciscan Order.
See Mazzara, Leggendario Francescano (1676), vol. i, pp. 29—31; Leon, Aureole Séraphique (English trans.), vol. i, pp. 442—443.
1331 BD ODORIC OF PORDENONE IT would not be easy to find in secular literature a more adventurous career than that of the Franciscan Friar Odoric of Pordenone. Miracle worker.
IT would not be easy to find in secular literature a more adventurous career than that of the Franciscan Friar Odoric of Pordenone. He was a native of Friuli, and his family name is said to have been Mattiussi. About the year 1300, when he was fifteen, he received the habit of St Francis at Udine, and his later biographers expatiate upon the extreme fervour with which he gave himself to prayer, poverty and penance. After a while he felt called to serve God in solitude, and he obtained the permission to lead the life of a hermit in a remote cell. We are not told how long he spent in this close communion with God, but he seems to have been guided to return to Udine and to take up apostolic work in the surrounding districts. Great success followed his preaching, and crowds gathered from afar to hear him. But about 1317, when he was a little over thirty, there came to him an inspiration of a somewhat different kind, and it is difficult from the documents before us to decide how far he was influenced in his subsequent career by a simple spirit of adventure and how far by the burning desire of the missionary to extend God’s kingdom and to save souls. We shall probably not be wrong in assuming that there was a mixture of both.

It is not easy to give precise dates, but according to Yule and Cordier he was in western India soon after 1322, he must have spent three of the years between 1322 and 1328 in northern China, and he certainly died at home among his brethren at Udine in January 1331.

With regard to the route he followed in his wanderings we are better informed. His first objective was Constantinople, and from thence he passed on to Trebizond, Erzerum, Tabriz and Soltania. There were houses of the order in most of these cities, and he probably made a considerable stay in each, so that this part of his journey may well have occupied three years. From Soltania he seems to have wandered about very irregularly, but eventually he came south through Baghdad to Hormuz at the entrance of the Persian Gulf, where he took ship and sailed to Salsette. At Tana, or possibly Surat, he gathered up the bones of his four brethren who had been martyred there shortly before, in 1321, and carried them with him on his voyage eastward. He went on to Malabar and Ceylon, and then probably rested for a while at the shrine of St Thomas at Mailapur, by the modern Madras. Here he again took ship for Sumatra and Java, possibly also visiting southern and eastern Borneo.

China was his next goal. Starting from Canton, he travelled to the great ports of Fo-kien, and from Fu-chau he pro­ceeded across the mountains to Hang-chau, then famous under the name of Quinsai as the greatest city of the world, and Nan-king. Taking to the water again upon the great canal at Yang-chau, he made his way to Khanbaliq, or Peking, and there remained for three years, attached apparently to one of the churches founded by Archbishop John of Montecorvino, another heroic Franciscan mission­ary, now in extreme old age. There Odoric turned his face homewards, passing through Shen-si to Tibet and its capital, Lhasa, but we have no further record of the course by which he ultimately reached his native province in safety. It is interesting to note that during the latter part at least of these long journeys Odoric had for his companion an Irish friar of the same order, one Brother James. The fact is known to us from a record preserved in the archives of Udine, which tells us that after Odoric’s death a present of two marks was made “for the love of God and the blessed Brother Odoric” to Brother James, the Irishman, who had been his companion on his journey.

The account which has been left us of Odoric’s travels, which unfortunately was not written down by himself at the time but dictated to one of his brethren after his return, says practically nothing of any missionary labours on his part. It is, therefore, not certain how far we may credit the wonderful stories which were current in later times regarding the success which attended his preaching. Luke Wadding, the annalist, declares that he converted and baptized 2o,ooo Saracens, but he gives us no idea of the source of his information. It is also stated that Odoric’s purpose in leaving China and returning to Europe was to obtain fresh supplies of missionaries and to conduct them himself to the Far East. At Pisa, however, St Francis appeared to him and bade him return to Udine, declaring that he himself would look after those distant missions about which Odoric was anxious. On his deathbed the worn-out apostle said that God had made known to him that his sins were pardoned, but that he wished, like a humble child, to submit himself to the keys of the Church and to receive the last sacraments.

He died on January 14, 1331. Many miracles are said to have been wrought after his death, and in one of these we hear again of Brother James the Irishman, for a certain Franciscan who was a preacher and doctor of theology at Venice, and had suffered cruelly from a painful malady of the throat, asked Brother James to recommend him to his late fellow traveller, and was immediately cured. The cultus long paid to him was approved in 1755.

The narrative of his journeys, as dictated in Latin by Bd Odoric, will be found printed in the Acta Sanctorum for January 14, but the fullest account, with translation and notes, will be found in Yule-Cordier, Cathay and the Way Thither (1913), vol. ii. See also Wadding, Annales, sa. 1331 ; M. Komroff, Contemporaries of Marco Polo (1928) ; and H. Matrod, L’itinéraire . . . du b. Odoric de Pordenone (1936). There is a fifteenth-century Welsh version of the voyages, ed. S. J. Williams, Ffordd y Brawd Odrig (1929). Fuller biblio­graphies in Yule and in U. Chevalier, Bio-Bibliographie.
1501 Servant of God John the Gardener; " as John insisted, forgiveness is the loveliest thing in God’s eyes."
   
John was born of poor parents in Portugal. Orphaned early in life, he spent some years begging from door to door. After finding work in Spain as a shepherd, he shared the little he earned with those even more needy than himself.

One day two Franciscans encountered him on a journey. Engaging him in conversation, they took a liking to the simple man and invited him to come and work at their friary in Salamanca. He readily accepted and was assigned to the task of assisting the brother with gardening duties. A short time later John himself entered the Franciscan Order and lived a life of prayer and meditation, fasting constantly, spending the nights in prayer, still helping the poor. Because of his work in the garden and the flowers he produced for the altar, he became known as "the gardener."

God favored John with the gift of prophecy and the ability to read hearts. Important persons, including princes, came to the humble, ever-obedient friar for advice. He was so loving towards all that he never wanted to take offense at anything. His advice was that to forgive offenses is an act of penance most pleasing to God.
He predicted the day of his own death: January 11, 1501.
Comment:    A monastery garden was tended well to feed the community, not to make the grounds pretty. John saw to it that the refectory table was well supplied. But he also added a bit of beauty, growing flowers to enhance the chapel. God is surely pleased when we add a bit of beauty to the world—especially when we warm it with an act of forgiveness. For, as John insisted, forgiveness is the loveliest thing in God’s eyes.
1518 BD GILES OF LORENZANA his ecstatic prayer and gift of prophecy were renowned far and wide. In particular he is said to have been frequently seen raised from the ground and to have been physically assaulted by the Evil One.
THE published lives of this Giles tell us that he was born about 1443 at Lorenzana in what was once the kingdom of Naples. His parents were a devout couple of the working class, and the boy was not hindered in the religious practices which he adopted from early youth, more especially after he came under the influence of the Franciscan friars, who made a foundation in his native town. In time he decided to serve God in solitude, settling near a little shrine of our Lady. Here he spent most of his time absorbed in prayer, the birds and beasts becoming his familiar companions. But the news of the miracles he was believed to work gradually attracted visitors, and being forced to seek refuge elsewhere, he next took service with a farmer near Lorenzana. Of this stage of his life it is said that, though he spent most of his time in church, his work, God so disposing, did not suffer from his absence. Eventually he was received into the Franciscan com­munity as a lay-brother, and being given the care of the garden, he was allowed to build himself a little hut there, where he lived as in a kind of hermitage. He was still the friend of the birds and all living creatures, and his miraculous cures, his ecstatic prayer and gift of prophecy were renowned far and wide. In particular he is said to have been frequently seen raised from the ground and to have been physically assaulted by the Evil One. He died on January 10, 1518. The state­ment made that six years after his death his incorrupt body, though it had been laid in the tomb in the ordinary way, was found kneeling, rosary in hand, and the face turned towards the Blessed Sacrament, can hardly be considered to rest upon evidence sufficient to establish so strange a marvel. The cult of Bd Giles was confirmed in 1880.
See Leon, Aureole Séraphique (English trans.), January 10 Antony da Vicenza, Vita e miracoli del B. Egidio (1880).
Saint Moses was one of the Holy Monastic Fathers Slain at Sinai and Raithu
 In Rhaíthi regióne, in Ægypto, sanctórum quadragínta trium Monachórum, qui, pro Christiána religióne, a Blémmiis occísi sunt.
       In Egypt, in the district of Raithy, forty-three holy monks, who were put to death by the Blemmians for the Christian religion.

There were two occasions when the monks and hermits were murdered by the barbarians. The first took place in the fourth century when forty Fathers were killed at Mt. Sinai, and thirty-nine were slain at Raithu on the same day.

Mount Sinai, where the Ten Commandments had been given to Moses, was also the site of another miracle. Ammonios, an Egyptian monk, witnessed the murder of the forty holy Fathers at Sinai. He tells of how the Saracens attacked the monastery and would have killed them all, if God had not intervened. A fire appeared on the summit of the peak, and the whole mountain smoked. The barbarians were terrified, and fled, while the surviving monks thanked God for sparing them.

That day, the Blemmyes (an Arab tribe) killed thirty-nine Fathers at Raithu (on the shores of the Red Sea). Igumen Paul of Raithu exhorted his monks to endure their suffering with courage and a pure heart.

The second massacres occurred nearly a hundred years later, and was also recorded by an eyewitness who miraculously escaped: St Nilus the Faster (November 12). The Arabs permitted some of the monks run for their lives. They crossed the valley and climbed up a mountain. From this vantage point, they saw the bedouin kill the monks and ransack their cells.

The Sinai and Raithu ascetics lived a particularly strict life: they spent the whole week at prayer in their cells. On Saturday they gathered for the all-night Vigil, and on Sunday they received the Holy Mysteries. Their only food was dates and water. Many of the ascetics of the desert were glorified by the gift of wonderworking: the Elders Moses, Joseph and others. Mentioned in the service to these monastic Fathers are: Isaiah, Sava, Moses and his disciple Moses, Jeremiah, Paul, Adam, Sergius, Domnus, Proclus, Hypatius, Isaac, Macarius, Mark, Benjamin, Eusebius and Elias.

Marytrs of Raithu Forty-three hermits in the Raithu Desert
 In monte Sina sanctórum trigínta octo Monachórum, a Saracénis ob Christi fidem interfectórum.
      On Mount Sinai, thirty-eight holy monks killed by the Saracens for the faith of Chris
near Mt. Sinai, in Palestine, close to the Red Sea. They were slain either by Saracens or by invading Ethiopians called Bedouins in old records.

The Holy Monastic Fathers Slain at Sinai and Raithu. There were two occasions when the monks and hermits were murdered by the barbarians. The first took place in the fourth century when forty Fathers were killed at Mt. Sinai, and thirty-nine were slain at Raithu on the same day.

Mount Sinai, where the Ten Commandments had been given to Moses, was also the site of another miracle. Ammonios, an Egyptian monk, witnessed the murder of the forty holy Fathers at Sinai. He tells of how the Saracens attacked the monastery and would have killed them all, if God had not intervened. A fire appeared on the summit of the peak, and the whole mountain smoked. The barbarians were terrified, and fled, while the surviving monks thanked God for sparing them.

That day, the Blemmyes (an Arab tribe) killed thirty-nine Fathers at Raithu (on the shores of the Red Sea). Igumen Paul of Raithu exhorted his monks to endure their suffering with courage and a pure heart.

The second massacres occurred nearly a hundred years later, and was also recorded by an eyewitness who miraculously escaped: St Nilus the Faster (November 12). The Arabs permitted some of the monks run for their lives. They crossed the valley and climbed up a mountain. From this vantage point, they saw the bedouin kill the monks and ransack their cells.

The Sinai and Raithu ascetics lived a particularly strict life: they spent the whole week at prayer in their cells. On Saturday they gathered for the all-night Vigil, and on Sunday they received the Holy Mysteries. Their only food was dates and water. Many of the ascetics of the desert were glorified by the gift of wonderworking: the Elders Moses, Joseph and others. Mentioned in the service to these monastic Fathers are: Isaiah, Sava, Moses and his disciple Moses, Jeremiah, Paul, Adam, Sergius, Domnus, Proclus, Hypatius, Isaac, Macarius, Mark, Benjamin, Eusebius and Elias.

1811 St. Joseph Pignatelli, as Pope Pius XI said, served as "the chief link between the Society of Jesus  that had been and the Society that was to be." b.1737
When St. Ignatius of Loyola established the Society of Jesus in the 16th century, he placed its members at the disposal of the popes.  The Jesuit order thus became one of the chief agencies used by the bishops of Rome in their worldwide governance of the Church.  It was therefore ironic that a pope in 1773 suppressed the order! Not until 1814 was the Society completely restored.  Then St. Joseph Pignatelli, as Pope Pius XI said, served as "the chief link between the Society that had been and the Society that was to be."
Joseph Mary Pignatelli belonged to the Spanish branch of a princely Italian family.  Born in Saragossa, Spain, he entered the Jesuits at 16.  After his ordination he worked in his native city.  There he became noted for his care of prisoners condemned to death.
In the late 18th century, the Jesuits entered troublous times.  The Bourbon family, which ruled several European nations, was increasingly antagonistic towards the papacy, and saw in the pro-papal Jesuit order an enemy that it was necessary to liquidate.  Following an agreed strategy, the several Bourbon rulers disbanded the Jesuit order in one country after another, and then coerced the pope into decreeing its worldwide suppression.
  Father Pignatelli, though plagued for years with tuberculosis, was a natural leader.  The duty fell upon him to take care of the throngs of dispersed and homeless Jesuit priests and brothers.  First Portugal, then France, abolished the local Jesuit order and exiled its members.  Abolition of the Spanish Jesuits came next.  In 1767 riots broke out in Saragossa.  Father Joseph successfully persuaded its citizens to stop their arson and looting, and even won the thanks of the king for so doing.  But then the government deceitfully accused Pignatelli of having started the riot, and on that basis exiled, in one day, some 600 Spanish Jesuits and Jesuit students.  Joseph took charge of the Spanish exiles, and when their ships could not secure admission to the port of Rome, he took them to Corsica, where he managed somehow to provide for them.  However, France soon assumed control of Corsica, so Pignatelli had to move his charges once again to Ferrara, Italy, where they joined other Jesuits from Peru and Mexico.  This community was broken up in 1773, when Pope Clement XIV issued his letter suppressing the Jesuits throughout the world.  Thus 23,000 men suddenly found themselves ousted from their order and left without provisions.
Father Joseph himself went to Bologna, Italy, where he and his brother, also a Jesuit, lived for the next few years.  Forbidden to exercise his priestly office, Joseph Pignatelli spent the months of exile at prayer and study, meanwhile doing his best to secure employment and sustenance for all he could of the many ex-Jesuits.
Naturally the former Jesuits hoped that their order would eventually be rehabilitated, for it had been dissolved without just cause.

Now, in White Russia the papal suppression was never carried out because the Russian Czarina Catherine II would not permit it.  When Father Joseph learned of this, he got permission from Pope Pius VI to affiliate with the Russian Jesuit province.  Recurrent illness prevented him from going to White Russia.  However, in 1788 Duke Ferdinand of Parma, Italy, with the approval of the pope and the encouragement of Fr. Pignatelli, allowed a vice-province of the Russian Jesuits to be set up in his duchy.  Grave problems continued, and the revival suffered many setbacks.  But in 1803 Father Joseph was named provincial for Italy.  Able now to return to Rome, he quietly continued the administration of the Society of Jesus in anticipation of its total restoration.
St. Joseph Pignatelli did not live to see the end of the 41-year suppression.  In a dying condition in 1811, he had himself carried to the bedside of the aged Father Aloisi Panizzoni, who was also supposed to be in his last hours of life.  You will not die, Joseph assured Panizzoni, but succeed me as provincial and participate in the order's rebirth!
The prophecy came true; Fr. Panizzoni was elected provincial, and on August 7, 1814, when aged over 90, he had the joy of receiving the papal brief of restoration from Pope Pius VII.
Joseph Mary Pignatelli had been a symbol and summary of the acute sufferings of the Jesuit order.  His total dedication to his brothers won for him the title "blessed" in 1933 and the rank of sainthood in 1954.     - -Father Robert F. McNamara
1833 Seraphim von Sarow
Orthodoxe und Anglikanische Kirche: 2. Januar  Katholische Kirche: 14. Januar


Seraphim von Sarow
Ikonenzentrum Saweljew Prochor Moschnin wurde am 19.7.1759 in Kursk geboren. Sein Vater, ein Kaufmann, starb früh. Schon als Jugendlicher beschloß er, Mönch zu werden und pilgerte nach Kiew. Von hier sandte ihn der Mönch Dosiphei nach Sarow. Am 20.11.1778 kam Seraphim in das Sarower Kloster, daas von Abt Pachomius geführt wurde. Hier lebte er 8 Jahre als Novize, hatte zahlreiche Visionen, besonders von der Gottesmutter Maria und genas mit ihrer Hilfe von lebensbedrohlicher Krankheit. 1786 legte er die Mönchsgelübde ab. Er wurde im gleichen Jahr zum Diakon geweiht und erhielt den Namen Seraphim. 1793 wurde er zum Priester geweiht. Nach dem Tod von Abt Pachomius ging Serpahim 1795 in die Wildnis, die das Kloster damals umgab und lebte hier als Einsiedler. Zur sonntäglichen Liturgie kehrte er in das Kloster zurück. In seiner Einsiedelei las Seraphim die Bibel und Schriften der Väter und lernte Kirchenlieder auswendig, um sie während der Arbeit singen zu können. Er führte ein streng asketisches Leben und versenkte sich oft in das Herzensgebet.
 
Als Seraphim zunehmend von Ratsuchenden aufgesucht wurde, bat er seinen Abt, daß ihn besonders Frauen nicht mehr besuchen sollten. Seine Klause wurde daraufhin von einem Walddickicht so verborgen, daß er nur noch mit den wilden Tieren zusammen lebte. Zeitweise war Seraphim so in das immerwährende Gebet vertieft, daß er sein Kloster nicht mehr aufsuchte. Am 12.11.1804 wurde er von zwei Räubern überfallen und haltot geschlagen. Er konnte sich in das Kloster schleppen, seine Wunden schienen aber dem Arzt tödlich zu sein. Er hatte aber wiederum eine Vision von Maria, die ihm mit Petrus und Johannes erschien und ihn heilte. Seraphim ging, obwohl er einen Stock beim Gehen benutzen mußte, in die Wildnis zurück. Schließlich baten ihn 1810 die Mönche und der Bischof, in das Kloster zurückzukehren. Hier schloß er sich am 9. Mai 1810 in seine Zelle ein. Er verbrachte sein Leben in der kargen Zelle in Gebet, Meditation und Schweigen. Am 25.11.1825 verließ er seine Zelle. Maria war ihm erneut erschienen und hatte ihn aufgefordert, als Starez (geistlicher Vater) unter die Menschen zu gehen. Seraphim, der sich bisher von Frauen ferngehalten hatte, betreute nunmehr die Nonnen des Diwejew-Klosters bei Sarow. Er nahm sich in Liebe aller Menschen, die ihn aufsuchten, an, heilte Kranke, prophezeite und lehrte beonders die Askese der Frauen. Er war aber auch gegenüber den Menschen, die Vollkommenheit suchten, sehr streng. So verlangte er einmal von einer Nonne, an Stelle ihres Bruders zu sterben. Viele seiner Prophezeiungen weisen auf die Oktoberrevolution und die antichristliche Zeit des Bolschewismus hin. Weit über Rußland hinaus bekannt wurde er durch die Aufzeichnungen des Richters Nikolai Alexandrowitsch Motowilow, der die Gespräche mit Seraphim unter dem Titel "Die Unterweisungen des Seraphim von Sarow" als Buch herausgab. Seraphim empfing am 1. Januar 1833 die Sakramente und verabschiedete sich von den Brüdern. Am Morgen des 2. Januar fanden ihn die Mönche kniend vor der Muttergottesikone mit dem Namen "Freude aller Freuden". Er war "vor Gott getreten". Nach dem gregorianischen Kalender war der 14. Januar sein Todestag, deshalb liegt der Gedenktag in der katholischen Kirche am 14. Januar.
1872  Wilhelm Löhe
Evangelische Kirche: 2. Januar

 Wilhelm Löhe wurde am 21.2.1808 als Kaufmannsohn in Fürth geboren. Schon als Kind wollte er Pfarrer werden. Nach dem Theologiestudium wurde er 1831 in Ansbach ordiniert. 1837 kam er als Pfarrer nach Neuendettelsau. Sein weiteres Leben blieb er in dem kleinen Dorf, das unter seiner Leitung zu einem Zentrum der lutherischen Kirche wurde. Er war auf vielen Gebieten tätig und erneuerte manches in der Kirche. Hervorzuheben ist zum einen sein Einsatz für ein klares Bekenntnis und für eine reichhaltige Liturgie. Er setzte sich auch für die deutschsprachigen Lutheraner in Nordamerika ein und bildete Diakone aus, um ihnen die deutsche Sprache zu erhalten. Aus diesem Arbeitszweig ist später die Neuendettelsauer Mission entstanden. Löhe sah auch deutlich, daß ein Glaube ohne Werke tot ist und setzte sich deshalb für die Liebeswerke der evangelischen Kirche ein. 1854 eröffnete er die Neuendettelsauer Diakonissenanstalt, die sich zu einem großen und segensreichen Werk entwickelte. Er schrieb mehrere Bücher, von denen er selbst das "Haus-, Schul- und Kirchenbuch für Christen lutherischen Bekenntnisses" als Frucht seines Lebens und Wirkens bezeichnete. Er starb am 2.1.1872 in Neuendettelsau.
 Trotz seiner großen Bedeutung für die bayrische evangelisch-lutherische Kirche und für die Innere und Äußere Mission wird die Theologie Wilhelm Löhe heute kaum beachtet; dabei können etwa seine liturgischen Arbeiten auch heute manche Anregung geben.

1892 ST ANTONY PUCCI a member of a religious order, the Servants of Mary, spent most of his life and achieved holiness as a parish priest and miracles of healing took place at his grave

THIS saint, though a member of a religious order, the Servants of Mary, spent most of his life and achieved holiness as a parish priest. He was born of peasant stock at Poggiole, near Pistoia, in 1819; he was the second of seven children and was christened Eustace. As a boy his kind and gentle disposition was noticeable, as was his industry and willingness to help, especially in his parish church, of which his father was sacristan. Nevertheless, when Eustace’s inclination to become a Servite had been finally confirmed during a pilgrimage to the shrine of our Lady at Bocca, Pucci senior and his wife opposed their son’s resolution (he was their eldest boy), and it was not till he was eighteen, in 1837, that he entered the Servite priory of the Annunciation at Florence. He took the names of Antony Mary.

During his early years as a religious Brother Antony showed those qualities of frankness and of steadiness in face of difficulties that were to distinguish him all his life. Prayer and obedience were his first concern, and after them study. He was ordained in 1843, and less than a year later was appointed curate of St Andrew’s church in Viareggio. In 1847, when still only 28, he became parish priest there. Viareggio is a seaside town—a fishing-port with a ship-building yard, but chiefly a holiday resort—and here Father Antony remained for the rest of his days.

Father Antony’s flock called him “II curatino”, which can’t be translated into English; but it means that he was “a grand little man, who was equally loved and respected. It has been said of him that he was before his time in recognizing the need for organization, and organizations, in a parish. But he never forgot that these things are but means to an end, and that end the life of divine charity; and that the living example of love must come from the father of the flock. He was the father and therefore the servant of all: the sick, the aged, the poor, all in trouble or distress, came to him, and he served them without stint. This selflessness was never more apparent than when Viareggio was visited by two bad epi­demics, in 1854 and in 1866; and one of the fruits of Father Antony’s love for the young was his inauguration of a seaside nursing-home for children—something quite new in those days. To the religious instruction of children he devoted much thought and work, emphasizing that what is done in church and school must be begun and finished in the home. Nor were his concerns bounded by the limits of his parish: in his enthusiasm for the conversion of the heathen Father Antony was one of the pioneers in Italy of the work of the A.P.F. and of the Holy Childhood Society.

St Antony Pucci died on January 14, 1892 at the age of 73; his passing was greeted with an outburst of grief in Viareggio, and miracles of healing took place at his grave. He was beatified in 1952, and canonized in 1962 during the Second Vatican Council.  See the decree of beatification in the Acta Apostolicae Sedis, vol. xliv (1952) ; and Un apostolo della Carità (1920), by a Servite.


 Saturday  Saints of January  14 Décimo nono Kaléndas Februárii.  

Pope Francis  PRAYER INTENTIONS FOR  January 2017
Universal: Interreligious Dialogue;  That sincere dialogue among men and women
of different faiths may produce the fruits of peace and justice.

Evangelization: Christian Unity; That by means of dialogue and fraternal charity
and with the grace of the Holy Spirit, Christians may overcome divisions.

   `   

God Bless Mother Angelica 1923-2016
ewtnmissionaries.com

On Death and Life
"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!    (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)
                      
 
                                                                           
     
We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
40 days for Life Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world

It is a great poverty that a child must die so that you may live as you wish -- Mother Teresa
 Saving babies, healing moms and dads, 'The Gospel of Life'

"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
It Makes No Sense Not To Believe In GOD 
Every Christian must be a living book
wherein one can read the teaching of the gospel

Jesus brings us many Blessings
 
The more we pray, the more we wish to pray. Like a fish which at first swims on the surface of the water, and afterwards plunges down, and is always going deeper; the soul plunges, dives, and loses itself in the sweetness of conversing with God. -- St. John Vianney

  Month by Month of Saintly Dedications


The Rosary html Mary Mother of GOD -- Her Rosary Here
Mary Mother of GOD Mary's Divine Motherhood: FEASTS OF OUR LADY
     of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

May 9 – Our Lady of the Wood (Italy, 1607) 
Months of Dedication
January is the month of the Holy Name of Jesus since 1902;
March is the month of Saint Joseph since 1855;
May, the month of Mary, is the oldest and most well-known Marian month, officially since 1724;
June is the month of the Sacred Heart since 1873;
July is the month of the Precious Blood since 1850;
August is the month of the Immaculate Heart of Mary;
September is the month of Our Lady of Sorrows since 1857;
October is the month of the Rosary since 1868;
November is the month of the Holy Souls in Purgatory since 1888;
December is the month of the Immaculate Conception.

In all, five months of the year are dedicated to Mary.
The idea of dedicating months came from Rome and promotion of the month of Mary owes much to the Jesuits.  arras.catholique.fr


Pray that the witness of 40 Days for Life bears abundant fruit, and that we begin again each day to storm the gates of hell until God welcomes us into the gates of heaven.

If you seek patience, you will find no better example than the cross. Great patience occurs in two ways:
either when one patiently suffers much, or when one suffers things which one is able to avoid and yet does not avoid.
Christ endured much on the cross, and did so patiently, because when he suffered he did not threaten;
he was led like a sheep to the slaughter and he did not open his mouth.-- St. Thomas Aquinas


                  We begin our day by seeing Christ in the consecrated bread, and throughout the day we continue to see Him in the torn bodies of our poor. We pray, that is, through our work, performing it with Jesus, for Jesus and upon Jesus.
The poor are our prayer. They carry God in them. Prayer means praying everything, praying the work.
We meet the Lord who hungers and thirsts, in the poor.....and the poor could be you or I or any person kind enough to show us his or her love and to come to our place.
Because we cannot see Christ, we cannot express our love to Him in person.
But our neighbor we can see, and we can do for him or her what we would love to do for Jesus if He were visible.
-- Mother Teresa
My God, I believe, I adore, I trust and I love Thee.  I beg pardon for those who do not believe, do not adore, do not love Thee.  O most Holy trinity, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, I adore Thee profoundly.
 I offer Thee the most precious Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ, present in all the Tabernacles of the world,  in reparation for the outrages, sacrileges and indifference by which He is offended,
and by the infite merits of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

I beg the conversion of poor sinners,  Amen Fatima Prayer, Angel of Peace
Mary's Divine Motherhood
Pope Francis and Pope Benedict XVI { 2013 } Catholic Church In China { article here}
1648 to1930 St. Augustine Zhao Rong and 120 Companions Christianity arrived in China by way of Syria -- 600s.
        Depending on China's relations with outside world,
Christianity for centuries was free to grow or forced to operate secretly.

How do I start the Five First Saturdays? 
Called in the Gospel “the Mother of Jesus,” Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as “the Mother of my Lord” (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity. Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos). 
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
“The Blessed Virgin was eternally predestined, in conjunction with the incarnation of the divine Word, to be the Mother of God. By decree of divine Providence, she served on earth as the loving mother of the divine Redeemer, an associate of unique nobility, and the Lord's humble handmaid. She conceived, brought forth, and nourished Christ.”
The voice of the Father is heard, the Son enters the water, and the Holy Spirit appears in the form of a dove.
   THE spirit and example of the world imperceptibly instil the error into the minds of many that there is a kind of middle way of going to Heaven; and so, because the world does not live up to the gospel, they bring the gospel down to the level of the world. It is not by this example that we are to measure the Christian rule, but words and life of Christ. All His followers are commanded to labour to become perfect even as our heavenly Father is perfect, and to bear His image in our hearts that we may be His children. We are obliged by the gospel to die to ourselves by fighting self-love in our hearts, by the mastery of our passions, by taking on the spirit of our Lord.
   These are the conditions under which Christ makes His promises and numbers us among His children, as is manifest from His words which the apostles have left us in their inspired writings. Here is no distinction made or foreseen between the apostles or clergy or religious and secular persons. The former, indeed, take upon themselves certain stricter obligations, as a means of accomplishing these ends more perfectly; but the law of holiness and of disengagement of the heart from the world is geeral and binds all the followers of Christ.
Saints of January 01 mention with Popes
2nd v. St. Elvan & Mydwyn;   Supposedly two Britons sent by King St. Lucius to Pope St. Eleutherius (c. 174-189) to ask for missionaries.

3rd v. St. Martina, virgin Item Romæ, via Appia, corónæ sanctórum mílitum trigínta Mártyrum, sub Diocletiáno Imperatóre. In the same city, on the Appian Way, the crowning with martyrdom of thirty holy soldiers under Emperor Diocletian. Alban Butler informs us correctly that there was a chapel in Rome consecrated to her memory which was frequented with great devotion in the seventh century. We also may learn from him that her relics were discovered in a vault in the ruins of her old church, and translated in the year 1634 under Pope Urban VIII, who built. a new church in her honour and himself composed the hymns used in her office in the Roman Breviary. He adds further that the city of Rome ranks her amongst its particular patrons.

510 St. Eugendus 4th abbot of Condat, near Geneva Switzerland. Also called Oyand, Eugendus was never ordained, but he was a noted Scripture scholar.  In the lives of the first abbots of Condat it is mentioned that the monastery, which was built by St Romanus of timber, being consumed by fire, St Eugendus rebuilt it of stone; and also that he built a handsome church in honour of SS. Peter, Paul and Andrew.
   His prayer was almost continual, and his devotion most ardent during his last illness. Having called the priest among his brethren to whom he had committed the office of anointing the sick, Eugendus caused him to anoint his breast according to the custom then prevalent, and he breathed forth his soul five days after, about the year 510, and of his age sixty-one.*{* The rich abbey of Saint-Claude gave rise to a considerable town built about it, which was made an episcopal see by Pope Benedict XIV in 1748, who, secularizing the monastery, converted it into a cathedral. The canons to gain admittance were required to give proof of their nobility for sixteen degrees, eight paternal and as many maternal.}

533 St. Fulgentius Bishop of Ruspe, Tunisia friend of St. Augustine; “A person may be endowed with the gift of miracles, and yet may lose his soul. Miracles insure not salvation; they may indeed procure esteem and applause; but what will it avail a man to be esteemed on earth and afterwards be delivered up to torments?”   Born Fabius Claudius Gordianus Fulgentius of Carthage, he was a Roman of senatorial rank. His mother, widowed, opposed Fulgentius’ religious career, but he became a monk. He became abbot with Felix but had to flee the monastery in 499 when Vandals or Numidians invaded, going to Sicca Veneria. Retuming to the area, Fulgentius was named bishop of Ruspe, circa 508. King Thrasamund , an Arian, banished Fulgentius to Sardinia, Italy where he and other bishops were aided by Pope St. Symmachus. Fulgentius founded a monastery and wrote such eloquent defenses of orthodox Catholic doctrines that King Thrasamund returned him to his see, only to banish him again. In 523, Fulgentius returned to his see, where he set about rebuilding the faith.

660 ST CLARUS, ABBOT; many marvellous stories of the miracles he worked, *{* It is perhaps desirable to remind the reader once for all that only Almighty God can do miracles. The use of the above and similar expressions is permissible by custom, but in fact God does the miracle through the agency or at the intercession of the saint concerned.}  patron of tailors.  St. Clarus Abbot  numerous miracles  patron of tailors
Clarus was born near Vienne, Dauphine', France. He became a monk at St. Ferreol Abbey and later was spiritual director of St. Blandina Convent, where his mother and sister were nuns. In time he became Abbot of St. Marcellus monastery at Vienne and lived there until his death on January 1. He is reputed to have performed numerous miracles, and his cult was confirmed in 1903 by Pope Pius X. He is the patron of tailors.


1031 St William of Saint Benignus, Abbot; character was great zeal and firmness joined with tender affection for his subjects;  did not hesitate to oppose, both by action and writings, the most powerful rulers of his time, like Emperor St Henry, Robert, King of France, and Pope John XIX, when he felt the cause of justice was at stake; In interests of the Cluniac reform he was constantly active, making many journeys and travelling as far as Rome.

1048 St. Odilo monk at Cluny 5th abbot ecstacies great austerities inaugurated All Souls' Day.  Though he was a friend of princes and popes, he was exceedingly gentle and kind and known throughout Christendom for his liberality to the needy. Odilo's concern for the people was also shown by the lavish help he gave during several famines, especially in 1006, when he sold Church treasures to feed the poor, and again from 1028-1033.

1252 Bl. Berka Zdislava founded Dominican priory of St. Laurence Communion daily;   Zdislava had visions and ecstasies, and even in those days of infrequent communion she is said to have received the Blessed Sacrament almost daily. When she fell grievously ill she consoled her husband and children by saying that she hoped to help them more from the next world than she had ever been able to do in this. She died on January 1, 1252, was buried in the priory of St Laurence which she had founded, and is stated to have appeared to her husband in glory shortly after her death. This greatly strengthened him in his conversion from a life of worldliness. Pope Pius X approved the cult paid to her in her native country in 1907. The alleged connection of Bd Zdislava Berka with the third order of St Dominic remains somewhat of a problem, for the first formal rule for Dominican tertiaries of which we have knowledge belongs to a later date.

1713 St. Joseph Mary Tomasi;  Cardinal confessor of Pope Clement XI {1649 1721}; He answered that the days of actual physical martyrdom are over, and that we are now in the days of hidden martyrdom, seen only by God; the lesson of it all being trust in God; Even before his death the sick were healed through touching his clothing, and when the end had come cures multiplied round his bier. Bd Joseph Tommasi was beatified in 1803.
.  Born the son of the duke of Palermo, he became a member of the Theatine Order. Sent to Rome, he became the confessor of Cardinal Giovanni Francesco Albani, proving instrumental in convincing the cardinal to accept elevation as pope in 1700 under pain of mortal sin. In return, the newly elected pontiff forced Joseph to accept appointment as a cardinal. While he served capably as a cardinal, his first preoccupation was as a brilliant liturgical scholar who published some of his works under the pseudonym J. M. Carus.Among his most notable contributions were: Codices Sacramentorunz Nongentis Annis Vetustiores (1680), including the Missale Gothicurn and the Missale Francorum; Responsalia etA ntiphonaria Ronzanae Ecclesiae a Sancto Gregorio Magno Disposita (1686); and the Antiqua Libri Missaruni Romanae Ecclesiae (1691). Beatified in 1803, he was canonized in 1986 by Pope John Paul II.

Saints of January 02 mention with Popes
379 St. Basil the Great  vast learning and constant activity, genuine eloquence and immense charity Patron of hospital administrators.  379 St Basil The Great, Archbishop of Caesarea and Doctor of The Church, Patriarch of Eastern Monks
St Basil was born at Caesarea, the capital of Cappadocia in Asia Minor, in the year 329.
St. Basil the Great (329-379)
Basil was on his way to becoming a famous teacher when he decided to begin a religious life of gospel poverty. After studying various modes of religious life, he founded what was probably the first monastery in Asia Minor. He is to monks of the East what St. Benedict is to the West, and his principles influence Eastern monasticism today.

One of a family of ten, which included St Gregory of Nyssa, St Macrina the Younger, and St Peter of Sebaste, he was descended on both sides from Christians who had suffered persecution. His father, St Basil the Elder, and his mother, St Emmelia, were possessed of considerable landed property, and Basil’s early years were spent at the country house of his grandmother, St Macrina, whose example and teaching he never forgot. He was less successful in his efforts on behalf of the Church outside his own province. Left by the death of St Athanasius the champion of orthodoxy in the East, he strove persistently to rally and unite his fellow Catholics who, crushed by Arian tyranny and rent by schisms and dissensions amongst themselves, seemed threatened with extinction. His advances, however, were ill-received and he found himself misunderstood, misrepresented, and accused of ambition and of heresy. Even appeals which he and his friends made to Pope St Damasus and the Western bishops to intervene in the affairs of the East and to heal the troubles met with little response—apparently because aspersions upon their good faith had been made in Rome itself.
Nevertheless, relief was at hand, and that from an unexpected quarter. On August 9, 378, the Emperor Valens was mortally wounded at the battle of Adrian­ople, and with the accession of his nephew, Gratian, came the end of the Arian ascendancy in the East. When the news reached St Basil he was on his death-bed, but it brought him consolation in his last moments. He died on January 1, 379 at the age of forty-nine, worn out by his austerities, his hard work, and a painful disease. The whole of Caesarea mourned him as a father and protector—pagans, Jews, and strangers joining in the general lamentation. Seventy-two years after his death the Council of Chalcedon described him as “The great Basil, the minister of grace who has expounded the truth to the whole earth”. He was undoubtedly one of the most eloquent orators the Church has ever produced and his writings have entitled him to a high place amongst her doctors. In the Eastern church his chief feast-day is on January 1.


1146? BD AYRALD, Bishop of MAURIENNE; “Here lies Ayrald, a man of noble blood, monk of Portes, glory of pontiffs, a light of the Church, stay of the unfortunate, shining with goodness and unnumbered miracles.”   THE identity of this holy bishop is involved in much confusion and obscurity. His cultus was confirmed in 1863, and in the decree published on that occasion a summary of his life is given.
If we may credit this account, he was a son of William II, Count of Burgundy. Of his three brothers, one was elected pope under the name of Callistus II; another, Raymond, became king of Castile; and the third, Henry, count of Portugal.


1836 St. Caspar del Bufalo Various miracles many graces were obtained by his intercession.  In 1814 he founded the Congregation of the Most Precious Blood and in 1815, it was formally approved. The second foundation was made in 1819 and the third shortly afterwards at Albano. His wish was to have a house in every diocese, the most neglected and wicked town or district being chosen. The Kingdom of Naples in those days was a nest of crime of every kind; no one's life or property was safe, and in 1821 the pope asked del Bufalo to found six houses there. He joyfully responded but met with endless difficulties before subjects and funds were collected.

Saints of January 03 mention with Popes

236 ST ANTHERUS, POPE AND MARTYR; the Liber Pontificalis states that he was put to death for obtaining copies of the official proceedings against the martyrs with the view of preserving them in the episcopal archives.  THE name of St Antherus occurs in the list of popes after that of St Pontian. He is believed to have been elected November 21, 235, and to have died January 3, 236, thus reigning only forty-three days. Nothing certain is known regarding his martyrdom, though the Liber Pontificalis states that he was put to death for obtaining copies of the official proceedings against the martyrs with the view of preserving them in the episcopal archives. He was buried in the “papal crypt” in the catacombs (Cemetery of St Callistus), and De Rossi discovered the site in 1854, together with the fragments of a Greek inscription.

  512 St. Genevieve Paris averted Attila scourge by fasting/ prayer;  500 ST GENEVIEVE, or GENOVEFA, VIRGIN
GENEVIEVE’S father’s name was Severus, and her mother’s Gerontia; she was born about the year 422 at Nanterre, a small village four miles from Paris, near Mont Valérien. When St Germanus, Bishop of Auxerre, went with St Lupus into Britain to oppose the Pelagian heresy, he spent a night at Nanterre on his way. The inhabitants flocked about them to receive their blessing, and St Germanus gave an address, during which he took particular notice of Genevieve, though she was only seven. After his sermon he inquired for her parents, and foretold their daughter’s future sanctity. He then asked Genevieve whether it was not her desire to serve God only and to be naught else but a spouse of Jesus Christ. She answered that this was what she desired, and begged that by his blessing she might be from that moment consecrated to God. The holy prelate went to the church, followed by the people, and during the long singing of psalms and prayers, says Constantius—that is during the recital of None and Vespers, as one text of the Life of St Genevieve expresses it—he laid his hand upon the maiden’s head. After he had supped he dismissed her, telling her parents to bring her again to him the next morning. The father obeyed, and St Germanus asked the child whether she remembered the promise she had made to God. She said she did, and declared that she hoped to keep her word. The bishop gave her a medal or coin, on which a cross was engraved, to wear about her neck, in memory of the consecration she had received the day before; and he charged her never to wear bracelets or jewels or other trinkets. The author of her life tells us that the child, begging one day that she might go to church, her mother struck her on the face, but in punishment lost her sight; she only recovered it two months after, by washing her eyes with water which her daughter fetched from the well and over which she had made the sign of the cross. Hence the people look upon the well at Nanterre as having been blessed by the saint.  

The city of Paris has frequently received sensible proofs of the divine protection, through St Genevieve’s intercession. The most famous instance is that called the miracle des Ardents, or of the burning fever. In 1129 a disease, apparently poisoning by ergot, swept off in a short time many thous and persons, nor could the art of physicians afford any relief. Stephen, Bishop of Paris, with the clergy and people, implored the divine mercy by fasting and sup­plications. Yet the epidemic did not abate till the shrine of St Genevieve was carried in a solemn procession to the cathedral. Many sick persons were cured by touching the shrine, and of all who then were suffering from the disease in the whole town only three died, and no others fell ill.

1130 Pope Innocent II, coming to Paris the year following, after due investigation ordered an annual festival in commemoration of the miracle on November 26, which is still kept in Paris. It was formerly the custom, in extraordinary public calamities, to carry the shrine of St Genevieve in procession to the cathedral. The greater part of the relics of the saint were destroyed or pillaged at the French Revolution.


Saints of January 04 mention with Popes
1821 St. ELIZABETH ANN SET0N (née Bayley). Born in New York City, 1774; married William Seton, 1794; widowed in 1803; received into the Catholic Church in 1805; made religious vows, 1809; died at Emmetsburg in Maryland, 4 January 1821. Mother Seton founded the American Sisters of Charity and was the first native-born American citizen to be beatified, in 1963.
Elizabeth Bayley Seton was the first native born American to be canonized by the Catholic Church.  Born two years before the American Revolution, Elizabeth grew up in the "cream" of New York society. She was a prolific reader, and read everything from the Bible to contemporary novels.  In spite of her high society background, Elizabeth's early life was quiet, simple, and often lonely. As she grew a little older, the Bible was to become her continual instruction, support and comfort; she would continue to love the Scriptures for the rest of her life.In 1794, Elizabeth married the wealthy young William Seton, with whom she was deeply in love. The first years of their marriage were happy and prosperous. Elizabeth wrote in her diary at first autumn, "My own home at twenty-the world-that and heaven too-quite impossible."
Born:  28 August 1774, New York City, New York, USA as Elizabeth Ann Bayley Died:  4 January 1821 Beatification:  17 March 1963 by Pope John XXIII Canonization:  14 September 1975 by Pope Paul VI Patronage:  death of children, in-law problems, loss of parents, opposition of Church authorities, people ridiculed for their piety, diocese of Shreveport Louisiana, widows.  
Readings
We must pray without ceasing, in every occurrence and employment of our lives - that prayer which is rather a habit of lifting up the heart to God as in a constant communication with Him.  Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton.  
Our God is God. All is as He pleases. I am the happiest creature in the thought that not the least thing can happen but by His will or permission; and all for the best.  Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton.  
The first end I propose in our daily work is to do the will of God; secondly, to do it in the manner he wills it; and thirdly to do it because it is his will.  Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton


Saints of January 05 mention with Popes
126 ST TELESPHORUS Pope in the time of Antoninus Pius, St. Telesphorus, pope, who, after many sufferings for the confession of Christ, underwent a glorious martyrdom.  Towards the year 126 he succeeded St Sixtus I, and saw the havoc which the persecution of Hadrian made in the Church. “He ended his life by a glorious martyrdom, says Eusebius, and he is the first one of the successors of St Peter whom St Irenaeus and other early writers refer to as a martyr. The ordinances attributed to him in the Liber Pontificalis, e.g. that the Mass of Christmas—a feast that did not then exist—should be celebrated at midnight, cannot with any probability be ascribed to his pontificate. St Teles­phorus is commemorated to-day in the Mass and Office of the vigil of the Epiphany.

 550 St. Emiliana Mystic aunt of Pope St. Gregory the Great    At Rome, the holy virgin Emiliana, aunt of Pope St. Gregory.  Being called to God by her sister Tharsilla, who had preceded her, she departed to heaven on this day.
She and a sister, Tharsilla, lived in Rome, in the home of their brother, Gregory’s father, practicing great austerity. Emiliana died on January 5, just a few days after Tharsilla.
550 Emiliana of Rome saintly life, visions  V (RM)
550 SS. THARSILLA AND EMILIANA, VIRGINS

 868 St. Convoyon Benedictine abbot exiled by Norseman in Brittany
IN 1866 Pope Pius IX approved the cultus, which from time immemorial had been paid in the neighbourhood of Redon in Brittany to the Benedictine monk who was the founder and abbot of the monastery of Saint Saviour. He was himself a Breton by birth, and it was in 831 that he, with six companions, obtained a grant of land on which to build an abbey. In the disturbed political conditions of the time, the early years of the new foundation seem to have been full of privation and hardship. Owing in part to a charge of simony brought against certain bishops of the province, Convoyon in 848 found himself a member of a deputation sent to Rome to appeal to Pope Leo IV. He is said to have brought back with him to his monastery a chasuble which Leo gave him, and also the relics of Pope St Marcellinus.
Later Convoyon was driven from his monastery by the incursions of the Norsemen, and was absent from it at the time of his death in 868. In 1866 the abbey of Saint Saviour at Redon had passed into the hands of a community of
the Eudist fathers, who were very active in procuring the confirmation of cultus for this local saint.

St. Charles of Sezze a lay brother at Naziano.  John Charles Marchioni was born at Sezze, Italy, on October 19, of humble parents. He became a shepherd and wanted to become a priest. When unable to do so because of his poor scholarship (He barely learned to read and write), he became a lay brother at Naziano, served in various menial positions - cook, porter, gardener - at different monasteries near Rome and became known for his holiness, simplicity, and charity.
He wrote several mystical works, lived a life of great mortifications, and worked heroically to help the stricken in the plague of 1656. He died in Rome on January 6. His family name may have been Melchior, and he is also known as Charles of Sezze. He was canonized by Pope John XXIII in 1959.


1236 St. Roger  da Todi  received the habit from St. Francis of Assisi.   Ruggiero da Todi (Roger) was appointed spiritual director of Blessed Philippa Mareri's Community at Rieti by Francis.
Roger died at Todi, shortly after Philippa's death January 5; his cult was confirmed by Pope Benedict XIV.
 

1860  Bd John NEPOMUCEN NEUMANN. Born in Bohemia, 1811; he was ordained priest in New York City in 1836 and joined the Redemptorist congregation; consecrated fourth bishop of Philadelphia in 1852; he died there on 5 January 1860. Bishop Neumann, a naturalized American citizen, organized Catholic schools into a diocesan system. He was beatified in 1963.
 January 5, 2010 St. John Neumann (1811-1860). The first American bishop to be canonized and the fourth bishop of Philadelphia. A native of Bohemia, he studied at the University of Prague, became a noted scholar, and entered the religious life. Deeply inspired by the letters of Father Frederic Baraga to the Leopold Missionary Society, he volunteered to labor in America, arriving in New York and receiving ordination on June 25, 1836. The next four years were spent in missionary work among the members of the German community around Niagara Falls. In 1840, he joined the Redemptorists in 1842- the first member to be professed in America - and ten years later, on March 28, 1852, he was consecrated bishop of Philadelphia at the suggestion of Archbishop Francis Kenrick of Baltimore. As bishop, Neumann founded fifty churches in the diocese, advanced the program on the cathedral, and was noted especially for his contribution to Catholic education. Finding only two parochial schools at his arrival, Neumann established nearly one hundred by the time of his passing. He also cared for the poor and orphans, and founded the Sisters of the Third Order of St. Francis. Beatified by Pope Paul VI in 1963, he was canonized in 1977.

Saints of January 06 mention with Popes
607 St. Peter of Canterbury  Benedictine 1st abbot monastery Sts. Peter/Paul - Canterbury. Peter was originally a monk in the monastery of St. Andrew’s, Rome, and was chosen by Pope St. Gregory I the Great {Doctor of the Church; b. Rome 540; d.12 March 604}to embark with St. Augustine of Canterbury and other monks on the missionary enterprise to England in 596.  Peter became the first abbot of the monastery of Sts. Peter and Paul at Canterbury in 602.  He died by drowning at Ambleteu, near Boulogne while on a mission to France.

 1275 St Raymond of Pennafort canon of Barcelona Dominican, Archbishop     At Barcelona in Spain, St. Raymond of Pennafort, of the Order of Preachers, celebrated for sanctity and learning.  His festival is kept on the 23rd of this month.
1175-1275) encouraged assisted and confessor for Peter Nolasco -- requested by the Blessed Virgin in a vision to found an order especially devoted to the ransom of captives from the Moors. The reputation of the saint for juridical science decided the pope to employ Raymond of Peñafort's talents in re-arranging and codifying the canons of the Church. He had to rewrite and condense decrees that had been multiplying for centuries, and which were contained in some twelve or fourteen collections already existing. We learn from a Bull of Gregory IX to the Universities of Paris and Bologna that many of the decrees in the collections were but repetitions of ones issued before, many contradicted what had been determined in previous decrees, and many on account of their great length led to endless confusion, while others had never been embodied in any collection and were of uncertain authority.

The pope announced the new publication in a Bull directed to the doctors and students of Paris and Bologna in 1231, and commanded that the work of St. Raymond alone should be considered authoritative, and should alone be used in the schools. When Raymond completed his work the pope appointed him Archbishop of Tarragona, but the saint declined the honour. Having edited the Decretals he returned to Spain. He was not allowed to remain long in seclusion, as he was elected General of the Order in 1238; but he resigned two years later.

1373 St. Andrew Corsini regarded as a prophet and a thaumaturgus miracles were so multiplied at his death that Eugenius IV permitted a public cult immediately; Feast kept on February 04.        At Florence, St. Andrew Corsini, a Florentine Carmelite and bishop of Fiesole.  Being celebrated for miracles, he was ranked among the saints by Urban VIII.  His festival is kept on the 4th of February.
He was born in Florence on November 30, 1302, a member of the powerful Corsini family. Wild in his youth, Andrew was converted to a holy life by his mother and became a Carmelite monk. He studied in Paris and Avignon, France, returning to his birthplace. There he became known as the Apostle of Florence. He was called a prophet and miracle worker. Named as the bishop of Fiesole in 1349, Andrew fled the honor but was forced to accept the office, which he held for twelve years. He was sent by Pope Urban V to Bologna to settle disputes between the nobles and commoners, a mission he performed well. Andrew died in Fiesole on January 6, 1373. So many miracles took place at his death that Pope Eugenius IV permitted the immediate opening of his cause.

1611  St. John de Ribera Archbishop Vice-roy of Valencia deported Moors Many miracles attributed his intercession.  Spain. He was the son of the duke of Alcala, and was born in Seville, Spain. Ordained a priest in 1557, he became archbishop in 1568, serving for more than four decades until he died on January 6, in Valencia. John ordered the Moors deported from his see. He was revered by Pope Pius V and King Philip II of Spain. Pope John XXIII canonized him in 1959.
 Providence seems perceptibly to have intervened to shield his virtue from danger. Realizing the perils to which he was exposed, he gave himself up to penance and prayer in preparation for holy orders. In 1557, at the age of twenty-five, Don John was ordained priest; and after teaching theology at Salamanca for a while, he was preconized bishop of Badajoz, much to his dismay, by St Pius V in 1562. His duties as bishop were discharged with scrupulous fidelity and zeal, and six years later, by the desire both of Philip II and the same holy pontiff, he was reluctantly constrained to accept the dignity of archbishop of Valencia. A few months later, filled with consternation at the languid faith and relaxed morals of this province, which was the great stronghold of the Moriscos, he wrote begging to be allowed to resign, but the pope would not consent; and for forty-two years, down to his death in 1611, St John struggled to support cheerfully a load of responsibility which almost crushed him. In his old age the burden was increased by the office of viceroy of the province of Valencia, which was imposed upon him by Philip III.


1925 BD RAPHAELA MARY, VIRGIN, FOUNDRESS OF THE HANDMAIDS OF THE SACRED HEART  her answer to misery was, I see clearly that God wants me to submit to all that happens to me as if I saw Him there commanding it.”  It cannot be doubted that it was in these years that she earned her halo of holiness.
The woman that inaugurated a religious congregation in the circum­stances that she did cannot have found such self-abnegation easy. Attention has several times been drawn in these pages to people who were popularly canonized because they accepted, not formal martyrdom, but simply an unjust death: Mother Raphaela is a beata who lived nearly half her life cheerfully carrying a weight of unjust treatment. Courage and sweetness shone out from her face in old age. The surgeon who operated on her in her last days said it all in a sentence:
Mother, you are a brave woman”; but she had said long before,
“I see clearly that God wants me to submit to all that happens to me as if I saw Him there commanding it.”
                           Bd Raphaela Mary died on the Epiphany in 1925, and she was beatified in 1952.

In English there is a good summary in pamphlet form, In Search of the Will of God (1950), by Fr William Lawson.



1937  Blessed André Bessette (b. 1845) expressed a saint’s faith by a lifelong devotion to St. Joseph.
 St. André Bessette  (1845-1937)  Brother André expressed a saint’s faith by a lifelong devotion to St. Joseph.
Sickness and weakness dogged André from birth. He was the eighth of 12 children born to a French Canadian couple near Montreal. Adopted at 12, when both parents had died, he became a farmhand. Various trades followed: shoemaker, baker, blacksmith—all failures. He was a factory worker in the United States during the boom times of the Civil War.


At 25, he applied for entrance into the Congregation of the Holy Cross. After a year’s novitiate, he was not admitted because of his weak health. But with an extension and the urging of Bishop Bourget (see Marie-Rose Durocher, October 6), he was finally received. He was given the humble job of doorkeeper at Notre Dame College in Montreal, with additional duties as sacristan, laundry worker and messenger. “When I joined this community, the superiors showed me the door, and I remained 40 years,” he said. He is buried at the Oratory. He was beatified in 1982 and canonized in 2010. At his canonization in October 2010, Pope Benedict XVI said that St. Andre "lived the beatitude of the pure of heart."

Saints of January 07 mention with Popes
St. Crispins 1/ Pavia Lombardy 30 yrs 2/bishop w Pope St. Leo I Great.
 Papíæ sancti Crispíni, Epíscopi et Confessóris.       At Pavia, St. Crispin, bishop and confessor.
Two brothers bore this name, both canonized. One served Pavia, in Lombardy, Italy, for thirty years.
The other was bishop in the reign of Pope St. Leo I the Great.

335-414 St. Nicetas of Remesiana Bishop Te Deum missionary friend of St. Paulinus of Nola who made fierce and barbarous nations humane and meek by preaching the Gospel to them.  Though a priest of Antioch, we find him at Nicomedia in the year 303, when Diocletian first published his edicts against the Christians. He there suffered a long imprisonment for the faith, for he wrote from out of his dungeon, “All the martyrs salute you. I inform you that the Pope Anthimus [Bishop of Nicomedia] has finished his course by martyrdom.” This happened in 303. Yet Eusebius informs us that St Lucian did not arrive himself at the crown of martyrdom till after the death of St Peter of Alexandria in 311, so that he seems to have continued nine years in prison.
856 St. Aidric Bishop court diplomat Charlemagne and son/successor Louis Raised at Aix-la-Chapelle, Germany, the royal residence of Charlemagne.   Aidric, or Aldericus, grew up serving Charlemagne and his son and successor, Louis. At twenty-one, Aidric left the honors of the court to study for the priesthood at Metz, France. After his ordination, he was recalled to the court by Louis. Nine years later he was made the bishop of Le Mans, where he became known for his sanctity and for his efforts on behalf of his people. When Louis died, Aidric supported Charles the Bald, one of Louis' sons fighting for the throne, and for this reason was forced out of Le Mans, only to be reinstalled by Pope Gregory IV. Aidric served as a legate to the court of King Pepin of Aquitaine, France, where he convinced that monarch to restore vast amounts of Church property stolen by the royal family.
Aidric also took part in the councils of Paris and Tours. He was paralyzed for the last two years of his life.

1131 St. Canute Lavard Martyred nephew of St. Canute son of King Eric the Good.  In Dánia sancti Canúti, Regis et Mártyris.  In Denmark, St. Canute, king and martyr.  Canute had spent part of his youth at the Saxon court, and in 1129 the Emperor Lothair III recognized his rule over the western Wends, with the title of king. This excited the anger of King Niels of Denmark, and on January 7, 1131, Canute was treacherously slain in the forest of Haraldsted, near Ringsted, by his cousins Magnus Nielssen and Henry Skadelaar. Canute, who had supported the missionary activities of St Vicelin, was canonized by Pope Alexander III in 1169 at the request of his son, Valdemar I of Denmark, and of Eskil, Archbishop of Lund. The Roman Martyrology, following the cultus, which Canute received in Denmark, calls him a martyr, but he seems to have been a dynastic hero rather than a martyr.
1225 St. Raymond of Peñafort Dominican Marian; sailed on water w/cloak; Patron of Canonists taught philosophy at 20-gratis. The brave religious of this Order devoted themselves to saving poor Christians captured by the Moors.  Raymund joined to the exercises of his solitude the functions of an apostolical life, by laboring without intermission in preaching, instructing, hearing confessions with wonderful fruit, and converting heretics, Jews, and Moors Among his penitents were James, king of Aragon, and St. Peter Nolasco, with whom he concerted the foundation of the Order of the B. Virgin of mercy for the redemption of captives. James, the young king of Aragon had married Eleonora of Castile within the prohibited degrees, without a dispensation. A legate was sent by pope Gregory IX. to examine and judge the case. In a council of bishops of the two kingdoms, held at Tar rayon, he declared the marriage null, but that their son Don Alphonso should be reputed lawfully born, and heir to his father's crown. The king had taken his confessor with him to the council, and the cardinal legate was so charmed with his talents and virtue, that he associated him in his legation and gave him a commission to preach the holy war against the Moors. The servant of God acquitted himself of that function with so much prudence, zeal, and charity, that he sowed the seeds of the total overthrow of those infidels in Spain.

Saints of January 08 mention with Popes
425 St. Atticus Bishop converted opponent of St. John Chrysostom then called a "true successor of Chrysostom" by Pope St. Celestine I.  Atticus was born in Sebaste. He was trained in a heretical sect but converted and was ordained in Constantinople. He and one Arsacacius aided in deposing St. John Chrysostom from the see of Constantinople at the Council of the Oak in 405. Atticus succeeded to the see of Constantinople in 406, recognized by Pope St. Innocent I. He was a tireless foe of heretics, called a "true successor of Chrysostom" by Pope St. Celestine I. Atticus died in Constantinople on October 10.

511 St. Maximus Bishop of Pavia, Italy. attended the councils of Rome convened by Pope Symmachus.  He attended the councils of Rome convened by Pope Symmachus.  

1309 Blessed Angela of Foligno dedicated to prayer and works of charity; her Book of Visions and Instructions Angela the title "Teacher of Theologians." She was beatified in 1693.  At her confessor’s advice, Angela wrote her Book of Visions and Instructions. In it she recalls some of the temptations she suffered after her conversion; she also expresses her thanks to God for the Incarnation of Jesus. This book and her life earned for Angela the title "Teacher of Theologians." She was beatified in 1693.
1456 St. Lawrence Justinian first Patriarch of Venice the death of Eminent for learning, and abundantly filled with the heavenly gifts of divine wisdom the 5th of September, on which day he ascended the pontifical throne.  The Diocese of Castello belonged to the Patriarchate of Grado. On 8 October, 1451, Nicholas V united the See of Castello with the Patriarchate of Grado, and the see of the patriarch was transferred to Venice, and Lawrence was named the first Patriarch of Venice, and exercised his office till his death somewhat more than four years later. His beatification was ratified by Clement VII in 1524, and he was canonized in 1690 by Alexander VIII. Innocent XII appointed 5 September for the celebration of his feast. The saint's ascetical writings have often been published, first in Brescia in 1506, later in Paris in 1524, and in Basle in 1560, etc. We are indebted to his nephew, Bernardo Giustiniani, for his biography.

Saints of January 09 mention with Popes
710 St. Adrian, African Abbot near Naples tomb famous for miracles.  710 ST ADRIAN, ABBOT OF CANTERBURY
ADRIAN was an African by birth, and was abbot of Nerida, not far from Naples, when Pope St Vitalian, upon the death of St Deusdedit, the archbishop of Canterbury, judged him for his learning and virtue to be the most suitable person to be the teacher of a nation still young in the faith. The humble servant of God found means to decline that dignity by recommending St Theodore in his place, but was willing to share in the more laborious part of the ministry. The pope therefore enjoined him to be the assistant and adviser of the archbishop, to which Adrian readily agreed.

Adrian was serving as an abbot in Italy when the new Archbishop of Canterbury appointed him abbot of the monastery of Sts. Peter and Paul in Canterbury. Thanks to his leadership skills, the facility became one of the most important centers of learning. The school attracted many outstanding scholars from far and wide and produced numerous future bishops and archbishops. Students reportedly learned Greek and Latin and spoke Latin as well as their own native languages.

He died there, probably in the year 710, and was buried in the monastery. Several hundred years later, when reconstruction was being done, Adrian’s body was discovered in an incorrupt state. As word spread, people flocked to his tomb, which became famous for miracles. Rumor had it that young schoolboys in trouble with their masters made regular visits there.


Saints of January 10 mention with Popes
681  Pope St. Agatho  678-681 a holy death, concluded a life remarkable for sanctity and learning.  AGATHO, a Sicilian Greek by birth, was remarkable for his benevolence and an engaging sweetness of temper. He had been married and engaged in secular pursuits for twenty years before he became a monk at Palermo; and was treasurer of the Church at Rome when he succeeded Donus in the pontificate in 678. He presided by his three legates at the sixth general council (the third of Constantin­ople) in 680 against the monothelite heresy, which he confuted in a learned letter by the tradition of the apostolic church of Rome “acknowledged”, says he, “by the whole Catholic Church to be the mother and mistress of all churches, and to derive her superior authority from St Peter, the prince of the apostles, to whom Christ committed His whole flock, with a promise that his faith should never fail”. This epistle was approved as a rule of faith by the same council, which declared, “Peter spoke by Agatho”.

1209 St. William of Bourges canon monk Cistercian many miracles deaf, dumb, blind, the mentally ill became sound. The stone of his tomb in the Cathedral Church of Bourges cured mortal wounds and illnesses and delivered possessed persons; the deaf and dumb, the blind, the mentally ill became sound. So many miracles occurred there that the monks could not record them all, and he was canonized nine years after his death, in 1218, by Pope Honorius III. At Bourges in Aquitaine, St. William, archbishop and confessor, renowned for miracles and virtues.  He was canonized by Pope Honorius III.
William de Don Jeon was born at Nevers France. He was educated by his uncle Peter, archdeacon of Soissons, became a canon of Soissons and of Paris and then became a monk at Grandmont Abbey. He became a Cistercian at Pontigny, served as Abbot at Fontaine-Jean in Sens, and in 1187 became Abbot at Chalis near Senlis. He was named Archbishop of Bourges in 1200, accepted on the order of Pope Innocent III and his Cistercian superior, lived a life of great austerity, was in great demand as a confessor, aided the poor of his See, defended ecclesiastical rights against seculars, even the king, and converted many Albigensians during his missions to them.

1276 Teobaldo Visconti Pope St. Gregory X 1210-1276; Arriving in Rome in March, he was first ordained priest, then consecrated bishop, and crowned on the 27th  of the same month, in 1272. He took the name of Gregory X, and to procure the most effectual succour for the Holy Land he called a general council to meet at Lyons. This fourteenth general council, the second of Lyons, was opened in May 1274. Among those assembled were St Albert the Great and St Philip Benizi; St Thomas Aquinas died on his way thither, and St Bonaventure died at the council. In the fourth session the Greek legates on behalf of the Eastern emperor and patriarch restored communion between the Byzantine church and the Holy See.;  miraculous cures performed by him.  At Arezzo in Tuscany, blessed Gregory X, a native of Piacenza, who was elected Sovereign Pontiff while he was archdeacon of Liege.  He held the second Council of Lyons, received the Greeks into the unity of the Church, appeased discords among the Christians, made generous efforts for the recovery of the Holy Land, and governed the Church in a most holy manner.
 1283 BD JOHN OF VERCELLI Immediately on his election to the see of Rome, Bd Gregory X imposed on John of Vercelli and his friars the task of again pacifying the quarrelling states of Italy, and three years later he was ordered to draw up a schema for the Second Ecumenical Council of Lyons. At the council he met Jerome of Ascoli (afterwards Pope Nicholas IV), who had succeeded St Bonaventure as minister general of the Franciscans, and the two addressed a joint letter to the whole body of friars. Later on they were sent together by the Holy See to mediate between Philip III of France and Alfonso X of Castile, continuing the work of peace-maker, in which John excelled.


Arriving in Rome in March, he was first ordained priest, then consecrated bishop, and crowned on the 27th  of the same month, in 1272. He took the name of Gregory X, and to procure the most effectual succour for the Holy Land he called a general council to meet at Lyons. This fourteenth general council, the second of Lyons, was opened in May 1274. Among those assembled were St Albert the Great and St Philip Benizi; St Thomas Aquinas died on his way thither, and St Bonaventure died at the council. In the fourth session the Greek legates on behalf of the Eastern emperor and patriarch restored communion between the Byzantine church and the Holy See. Pope Gregory, we are told, shed tears whilst the Te Deum was sung. Unhappily the reconciliation was short-lived.
After the council, Bd Gregory devoted all his energies to concerting measures for carrying its decrees into execution, particularly those relating to the crusade in the East, which, however, never set out. This unwearied application to business, and the fatigues of his journey across the Alps on his return to Rome brought on a serious illness, of which he died at Arezzo on January 10, 1276. The name of Gregory X was added to the Roman Martyrology by Pope Benedict XIV; his holiness was always recognized, and had he lived longer he would doubtless have left a deeper mark on the Church.

Saints of January 11 mention with Popes
137-140 St. Hyginus, Pope a Greek confronts Gnostic heresy       At Rome, St. Hyginus, pope, who suffered a glorious martyrdom in the persecution of Antoninus.
Pope from 137-140, successorto Pope St. Telesphorus. He was a Greek, and probably had a pontificate of four years. He had to confront the Gnostic heresy and Valentinus and Cerdo, leaders of the heresy, who were in Rome at the time. Some lists proclaim him a martyr. His cult was suppressed in 1969.

250 St. Alexander "The charcoal burner" Bishop of Comana, in Pontus martyr
The discovery of his virtues was due to the very contempt with which he had been regarded. St. Gregory Thaumaturgus had been asked to come to Comana to help select a bishop for that place. As he rejected all the candidates, someone in derision suggested that he might accept Alexander, the charcoal-burner. Gregory took the suggestion seriously, summoned Alexander, and found that he had to do with a saint and a man of great capabilities.
In the modern Roman Martyrology his name occurs, and he is described as a "philosophus disertissimus."
  570 St. Anastasius X Benedictine abbot angel summoned him and monks to heaven. At Suppentonia, near Mount Soracte, St. Athanasius, monk, and his companions, who were called by a voice from heaven to enter the kingdom of God.
Noted by Pope St. Gregory the Great. Anastasius became a monk at Suppentonia in the diocese of Nepi, Italy, serving in time as abbot. Pope St. Gregory the Great recorded that an angel appeared to summon Anastasius and his monks, all of whom died in rapid succession after the visitation.

Saints of January 12 mention with Popes
690 St. Benedict Biscop an English monastic founder; five pilgrimages to Rome; SS Peter and Paul monasteries became the best-equipped in England, and St Benedict’s purchase of books was of special significance, for it made possible the work of the Venerable Bede; On his return to England, Benedict introduced, whenever he could, the religious rites as he saw them practised in Rome; first to introduce into England the building of stone churches and the art of making glass windows; Pope Vitalian sent him and the monk Adrian as advisers with Theodore, the newly appointed Archbishop of Canterbury

1700 St. Marguerite Bourgeoys; Children from European as well as Native American backgrounds in seventeenth-century Canada benefited from her great zeal and unshakable trust in God’s providence.  
Comment: It’s easy to become discouraged when plans that we think that God must endorse are frustrated. Marguerite was called not to be a cloistered nun but to be a foundress and an educator. God had not ignored her after all.

Quote: In his homily at her canonization, Pope John Paul II said, “...in particular, she [Marguerite] contributed to building up that new country [Canada], realizing the determining role of women, and she diligently strove toward their formation in a deeply Christian spirit.” He noted that she watched over her students with affection and confidence “in order to prepare them to become wives and worthy mothers, Christians, cultured, hard-working, radiant mothers.”

1892 St. Anthony Mary Pucci Servite priest caring for sick poor pioneering Holy Childhood Society.  Born Ap16 1819 Poggiole, Italy christened Eustace. He entered the Servites about 1837, taking the name Anthony Mary, and ordained in 1843. Assigned to Viareggio, Italy, Anthony became pastor of the parish in 1847. His entire life was spent instructing children, caring for the sick and poor, and pioneering the Holy Childhood Society.  He was heroic during the epidemics of 1854 and Anthony Mary died on January 14, 1892, in Viareggio. He was canonized in 1962.


Saints of January 13 mention with Popes
368 St. Hilary gentle courteous devoted writing great theology on Trinity      At Poitiers in France, the birthday of St. Hilary, bishop and confessor of the Catholic faith which he courageously defended, and for which he was banished for four years to Phrygia, where, among other miracles, he raised a man from the dead.  Pius IX declared him a doctor of the Church.  His festival is celebrated tomorrow.

1497 Blessed Veronica of Binasco (b. 1445) known as a great contemplative who also gave loving care to sick sisters in her community and ministered to the people of Milan. She had the gifts of prophecy, discernment and miracles..  Although she never learned to read and write, she was known and respected by the secular and ecclesiastical leaders of her day. Several times Christ gave to St. Martha, blessed Veronica of Binasco, virgin, of the Order of St. Augustine in prayer important messages which she carried to influential persons such as the Duke of Milan and Pope Alexander VI.
Born Giovanna Negroni in Binasco, Milan, Italy in 1445, she was raised in a peasant family. When she was 22 years old, she joined the monastery of Saint Martha in Milan. She took the religious name Veronica, reflecting her devotion to the Passion of Christ.
She always spoke of her own sinful life, as she called it, though, indeed, it was most innocent, with feelings of intense compunction. Veronica was favoured by God with many extraordinary visions and consolations. A detailed account is preserved of the principal incidents of our Lord’s life as they were revealed to her in her ecstasies. By her moving exhortations she softened and converted several obdurate sinners. She died at the hour which she had foretold, in the year 1497, at the age of fifty-two, and her sanctity was confirmed by miracles. Pope Leo X in 1517 permitted her to be honoured in her monastery in the same manner as if she had been beatified according to the usual forms, and the name of Bd Veronica of Binasco is inserted on this day in the Roman Martyrology, an unusual distinction in the case of a servant of God who has not been formally canonized.

Saints of January 14 mention with Popes

   255 St. Felix of Nola Bishop distributed inheritance to the poor assistant to St. Maximus of Nola tomb famous for miracles      At Nola in Campania, the birthday of St. Felix, priest, who (as is related by bishop St. Paulinus), after being subjected to torments by the persecutors, was cast into prison, bound hand and foot, and extended on shells and broken earthenware.  In the night, however, his bonds were loosened and he was delivered by an angel.  The persecution over, he brought many to the faith of Christ by his exemplary life and teaching, and, renowned for miracles, rested in peace..  Pope St Damasus pays a tribute in verse to Felix for a cure he himself had received. Cf. Quentin, Les Martyrologes historiques, pp. 518—522.
St Felix was a native of Nola, a Roman colony in Campania, fourteen miles from Naples, where his father Hermias, who was by birth a Syrian and had served in the army, had purchased an estate and settled down. He had two sons, Felix and Hermias, to whom at his death he left his patrimony. The younger sought preferment in the world by following the profession of arms. Felix, to become in effect what his name in Latin imported, that is “happy”, resolved to follow no other standard than that of the King of kings, Jesus Christ. For this purpose he distributed most of his possessions among the poor, and was ordained priest by St Maximus, Bishop of Nola, who, charmed with his virtue and prudence, made him his right hand in those times of trouble, and looked upon him as his destined successor.

368  Sancti Hilárii, Epíscopi Pictaviénsis, Confessóris et Ecclésiæ Doctóris; qui prídie hujus diéi evolávit in cælum.      St. Hilary, bishop of Poitiers, confessor and doctor of the Church, who entered heaven on the thirteenth day of this month.  ST AUGUSTINE, who often urges the authority of St Hilary against the Pelagians, styles him “the illustrious doctor of the churches”. St Jerome says that he was amost eloquent man, and the trumpet of the Latins against the Arians” and in another place, that “in St Cyprian and St Hilary, God had transplanted two fair cedars out of the world into His Church  St Hilary was born at Poitiers, and his family was illustrious in Gaul. He himself testifies that he was brought up in idolatry, and gives us a detailed account of the steps by which God conducted him to a knowledge of the faith, He con­sidered, by the light of reason, that man, a moral and free agent, is placed in this world for the exercise of patience, temperance, and other virtues, which he saw must receive a recompense after this life. He ardently set about learning what God is, and quickly discovered the absurdity of polytheism, or a plurality of gods he was convinced that there can be only one God, and that He must be eternal, unchangeable, all-powerful, the first cause and author of all things. Hilary died at Poitiers, probably in the year 368, but neither the year nor the day of the month can be determined with certainty. The Roman Martyrology names his feast on January 14. St Hilary was proclaimed a doctor of the Church by Pope Pius IX in 1851.

 552 St. Datius Bishop of Milan, Italy , exiled by the Arian Ostrogoths  Driven from Milan the bishop betook himself to Constan­tinople, where, in 545, he boldly supported Pope Vigilius against Justinian in the controversy concerning the “Three Chapters”. He seems to have died in 552, while still at Constantinople, whence his remains were at a later date translated to his episcopal city of Milan. Pope St Gregory the Great in his Dialogues recounts a curious story of a haunted house from which the devil used to frighten all intending occupants, by producing the most alarming and discordant howlings of beasts. St Datius, however, showed no fear, but put the aggressor to shame and restored perfect quiet.

1180 Saint Lawrence O'Toole descendant of Irish petty kings    Dublin was a turbulent place in those days. It was practically under the control of half-pagan Danish settlers.  Archbishop Lawrence was a staunch reformer, which won him few friends. He established a rule of life for the clergy of his cathedral, and followed it strictly himself. At several local church councils he upheld the rights of the Church. He also went to Rome to take part in the reformist Third Council of the Lateran (1179). When he passed through England, King Henry II asked him to swear that while at Rome he would do nothing to infringe on the regal "rights" over the church in England and Ireland. Nevertheless, Lawrence was able to obtain from Pope Alexander II papal protection for the dioceses of the Dublin Province. The pope also named him papal legate to Ireland.

1200 BD ODO OF NOVARA He worked many miracles both during life and after death, but it horrified him to think that people should attribute to him any supernatural power.  BD Odo, a Carthusian monk of the twelfth century, stands out from among some of his saintly contemporaries by the fact that we have good first-hand evidence concerning his manner of life. Pope Gregory IX ordered an inquiry to be made with a view to his canonization, and the depositions of the witnesses are still preserved. One or two extracts will serve to sketch his portrait better than a narrative.

 “Master Richard, Bishop of Trivento, having been adjured in the name of the Holy Ghost, the holy Gospels lying open before him, affirmed that he had seen the blessed Odo and knew him to be a God-fearing man, modest and chaste, given up night and day to watching and prayer, clad only in rough garments of wool, living in a tiny cell, which he hardly ever quitted except to pray in the church, obeying always the sound of the bell when it called him to office. Without ceasing, he poured forth his soul in sighs and tears; there was no one he came across to whom he did not give new courage in the service of God; he constantly read the divine Scriptures, and in spite of his advanced age, as long as he stayed in his cell, he laboured with his hands as best he could that he might not fall a prey to idleness.”

One of these, the Archpriest Oderisius, deposes that he was present when Odo breathed his last, and that “as he lay upon the ground in his hair-shirt in the aforesaid little cell, he began to say, when at the point of death, ‘Wait for me, Lord, wait for me, I am coming to thee’; and when they asked him to whom he was speaking, he answered, ‘It is my King, whom now I see, I am standing in His presence.’ And when the blessed Odo spoke these words, just as if someone were offering him his hand, he stood straight up from the ground, and so, with his hands stretched out heavenwards, he passed away to our Lord.” This happened on January 14 in the year 1200, when Odo was believed to be nearly a hundred years old.

1225 St. Sava patron of Serbia monk founded monasteries translated religious works into Serbian. THE public ecclesiastical life and politics of St Sava (i.e. Sabas) were to a great extent conditioned by political considerations, a circumstance common to many churchmen in history, and nowhere more acute than in the Balkans, at the junction of great civil and ecclesiastical powers and the meeting-place of diverse cultures.

Sava, born in 1174, was the youngest of the three sons of Stephen I, founder of the dynasty of the Nemanydes and of the independent Serbian state. At the age of seventeen he became a monk on the Greek peninsula of Mount Athos, where he was joined by his father when that prince abdicated in 1196. Together they established a monastery for Serbian monks, with the name of Khilandari, which is still in existence as one of the seventeen “ruling monasteries” of the Holy Mountain. As abbot, Sava was noted for his light and effective touch in training young monks; it was remarked, too, that his influence was always on the side of gentleness and leniency. He began the work of translating books into the Serbian language, and there are still treasured at Khilandari a psalter and ritual written out by himself, and signed, “I, the unworthy lazy monk Sava”.

1811 St. Joseph Pignatelli, Pius XI said, served "chief link between Society of Jesus that had been and Society to be."  
When St. Ignatius of Loyola established the Society of Jesus in the 16th century, he placed its members at the disposal of the popes.  The Jesuit order thus became one of the chief agencies used by the bishops of Rome in their worldwide governance of the Church.  It was therefore ironic that a pope in 1773 suppressed the order! Not until 1814 was the Society completely restored.  Then St. Joseph Pignatelli, as Pope Pius XI said, served as "the chief link between the Society that had been and the Society that was to be."
Joseph Mary Pignatelli belonged to the Spanish branch of a princely Italian family.  Born in Saragossa, Spain, he entered the Jesuits at 16.  After his ordination he worked in his native city.  There he became noted for his care of prisoners condemned to death.

1892 ST ANTONY PUCCI a member of a religious order, the Servants of Mary, spent most of his life and achieved holiness as a parish priest and miracles of healing took place at his grave.

St Antony Pucci died on January 14, 1892 at the age of 73; his passing was greeted with an outburst of grief in Viareggio, and miracles of healing took place at his grave. He was beatified in 1952, and canonized in 1962 during the Second Vatican Council.  See the decree of beatification in the Acta Apostolicae Sedis, vol. xliv (1952) ; and Un apostolo della Carità (1920), by a Servite.

Saints of January 15 mention with Popes

Saints of January 16 mention with Popes



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THE EUCHARIST, A MYSTERY TO BE BELIEVED POST-SYNODAL APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION
SACRAMENTUM CARITATIS OF THE HOLY FATHER BENEDICT XVI
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Miracles by Century 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000    1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800   1900  Miracles_BLay Saints
Morning Prayer and Hymn    Meditation of the Day    Prayer for Priests    Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List  Here
We are called upon with the whole Church militant on earth to join in praising and thanking God for the grace and glory he has bestowed on his saints. At the same time we earnestly implore Him to exert His almighty power and mercy in raising us from our miseries and sins, healing the disorders of our souls and leading us by the path of repentance to the company of His saints, to which He has called us.
   They were once what we are now, travellers on earth they had the same weaknesses, which we have. We have difficulties to encounter so had the saints, and many of them far greater than we can meet with; obstacles from kings and whole nations, sometimes from the prisons, racks and swords of persecutors. Yet they surmounted these difficulties, which they made the very means of their virtue and victories. It was by the strength they received from above, not by their own, that they triumphed. But the blood of Christ was shed for us as it was for them and the grace of our Redeemer is not wanting to us; if we fail, the failure is in ourselves.
   THE saints and just, from the beginning of time and throughout the world, who have been made perfect, everlasting monuments of God’s infinite power and clemency, praise His goodness without ceasing; casting their crowns before His throne they give to Him all the glory of their triumphs: “His gifts alone in us He crowns.”
“The saints must be honored as friends of Christ and children and heirs of God, as John the theologian and evangelist says: ‘But as many as received him, he gave them the power to be made the sons of God....’ Let us carefully observe the manner of life of all the apostles, martyrs, ascetics and just men who announced the coming of the Lord. And let us emulate their faith, charity, hope, zeal, life, patience under suffering, and perseverance unto death, so that we may also share their crowns of glory” Exposition of the Orthodox Faith

Called in the Gospel the Mother of Jesus, Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as the Mother of my Lord (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son,  the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos).
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart ... From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque
On Friday during Holy Communion, He said these words to me, His unworthy slave, if I mistake not:
I promise you in the excessive mercy of my Heart that its all-powerful love will grant to all those who receive Holy Communion on nine first Fridays of consecutive months the grace of final repentance; they will not die under my displeasure or without receiving their sacraments, my divine Heart making itself their assured refuge at the last moment.