Mary Mother of GOD
15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary
 Monday  Saints of this Day November 07 Séptimo Idus Novémbris  
Et álibi aliórum plurimórum sanctórum Mártyrum et Confessórum, atque sanctárum Vírginum.
And elsewhere in divers places, many other holy martyrs, confessors, and holy virgins.

Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!  (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)

Six Canonized on Feast of Christ the King Nov 23 2014

CAUSES OF SAINTS April  2014

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Acts of the Apostles

Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

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Mary Mother of GOD 15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary


1463 St. Didacusis living proof that God “chose what is foolish in the world to shame the wise;
God chose what is weak in the world to shame the strong
(1 Corinthians 1:27).
San Diego, California, is named for this Franciscan, who was canonized in 1588.
He was born in Spain with no outstanding reputation for learning, but like our first teachers and leaders unlettered as men count wisdom, an unschooled person, a humble lay brother in religious life. [God chose Didacus] to show in him the abundant riches of his grace to lead many on the way of salvation by the holiness of his life and by his example and to prove over and over to a weary old world almost decrepit with age that God's folly is wiser than men, and his weakness is more powerful than men”. (Bull of Canonization).
  November 7

St. Didacusis living proof that God “chose what is foolish in the world to shame the wise;
God chose what is weak in the world to shame the strong
(1 Corinthians 1:27).
San Diego, California, is named for this Franciscan, who was canonized in 1588.
He was born in Spain with no outstanding reputation for learning, but like our first teachers and leaders unlettered as men count wisdom, an unschooled person, a humble lay brother in religious life. [God chose Didacus] to show in him the abundant riches of his grace to lead many on the way of salvation by the holiness of his life and by his example and to prove over and over to a weary old world almost decrepit with age that God's folly is wiser than men, and his weakness is more powerful than men”. (Bull of Canonization).

November 7 – Coptic Church: Feast of Saint Anne 
 
The glory of her Daughter will reflect back on her through all generations
 
God, who had predestined this child to become the grandmother of the Savior, filled her with the most remarkable graces. After Mary, no other woman was more blessed and privileged than Saint Anne.

She surpassed all other girls—her companions—in piety, modesty, reverence and holiness in all her behavior. When it pleased God to unite her life with that of Saint Joachim ("God grants"), Anne ("Grace") was a considerate and charitable wife. Then, God kept her from enjoying motherhood for a long time. She humbly submitted to this trial and used it for her sanctification.

This test was followed by a great joy because from the union of Joachim and Anne, who were already old, came the birth of the one who was to be the Mother of the Savior and the Co-Redemptrix of mankind.

It was a great honor for Saint Anne to have given birth to the Mother of God. But she deserves far more glory for having formed the Heart of Mary in virtue and innocence! The Church will celebrate in all ages the maternal piety of Saint Anne, and the glory of her Daughter will reflect back on her through all generations.
 
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November 7 - Our Lady of the Pond (Dijon, France, 1531)  The Palm of Virginity
Following a tradition based on the Gospel of Saint Peter and the Book of James, some people consider the brothers and the sisters of Jesus Joseph's children, born out of a first wedlock he may have had prior to marrying the Blessed Virgin.

Those who speak thus want to safeguard Mary's honor in her virginity until the end. Of course they can't admit that the body chosen for the instrument of the Word who said, The Holy Spirit will come upon you and the power of the Most High will cover you with its shadow, could have lain with a man, after having received the Holy Spirit's visit and the shadow of the power of the Most High.
I believe that the palm of virginity must belong to Jesus among men and to Mary among women. How could we, without impiousness, allot to another woman the palm of virginity? Origen 3rd century A.D.
100 AD Saint Prosdocimus (Prosdecimus) of Padua; venerated as the first bishop of Padua. Of Greek origin, tradition holds that he was sent from Antioch by Saint Peter the Apostle.
           St. Auctus unknown Martyr with Taurion in Thessalonica
3rd v. Amaranthus of Albi Saint Gregory of Tours attests to the martyrdom
  300 St. Hieron Martyr with Hesychius & 31 Armenians
Nicander, and thirty Armenians. They suffered at Melitene.
  313 St. Achillas Bishop of Alexandria theologian lived in era of dispute in Church
  360 St. Melasippus Martyr with Carina, his wife, and Anthony, their son
  400 St. Rufus of Metz  Bishop for nearly 3 decades
6th v. St. Tremorus murdered while still an infant by his father
547 ST HERCULANUS, BISHOP OF PERUGIA, MARTYR
  675 St. Gebetrude Third abbess of the Benedictine Abbey of Remiremont
  693 St. Florentius of Strasbourg Irish bishop curing the blind and deaf
  700 St. Amarand Bishop and Benedictine abbot
  739 St. Willibrord Apostle of Frisians Netherlands missionary archbishop
6 or 8th v.? St. Cumgar Monastic founder
9th v. St. Blinlivet 25th bishop of Vannes; asceticism and prayerfulness
1053 The Monk Lazaros of Galiseia was born in Lydia, in the city of Magnesium; The brethren buried the body of the saint at the pillar, upon which he had pursued asceticism. The saint was glorified by many miracles after his death
        St. Ernest Abbot Benedictine Abbey of Zwiefalten martyr Crusades Mecca
1225 St. Engelbert Archbishop of Cologne martyr
1280 BD MARGARET COLONNA, VIRGIN
1300 BD MATTHIA OF MATELICA, VIRGIN Miracles incorrupt in 1756; Miracles became so frequent at her grave that the body was soon moved to a tomb beside the high altar of the chapel, where her veneration was continued without interrup­tion. In 1756 the tomb had to be moved on account of repairs, and the Bishop of Camerino took the opportunity to examine the relics; the body was found to be incorrupt and giving off a pleasant smell. It was re-enshrined under the altar of St Cecilia, and since then miracles have again been reported there.
1365 BD PETER OF RUFFIA, MARTYR ; nominated inquisitor general for Piedmont, Upper Lombardy and Liguria. Several sects were active in northern Italy at that time, particularly the Waldensians, and for fourteen years Bd Peter laboured among them. The measure of his success was also the measure of the hatred which the more stubborn heretics had for him.
1463 St. Didacusis living proof that God chose what is foolish in the world to shame the wise;
          God chose what is weak in the world to shame the strong
(1 Corinthians 1:27).
1717 Bl. Anthony Baldinucci Jesuit missionary preacher; His father, painter and writer by profession, after recovery from an illness, which he attributed to the intercession of St Antony of Padua, vowed his next child to that saint; and when a boy was born in 1665, appropriately within the octave of his feast, he had him baptized Antony and brought up with the idea of becoming a priest. The Baldinucci family lived in the same house in the via degli Angeli at Florence in which St Aloysius Gonzaga had lived for a time when a child, and the intimate memory of this young saint had much influence on the growing Antony. When he was sixteen he offered himself to the Society of Jesus and was accepted, in spite of his rather uncertain health.
1773 St. Hyacinth Castaneda Martyr of Vietnam a Dominican
1773 St. Vincent Liem Vietnamese Dominican martyr native
1814 Bl. Peter Ou  Chinese martyr; native; six hundred converts
        Saint Amandin Patron of Saint-Amandin (Cantal) and of a church in Clermont- Ferrand
687 to 701 Pope Saint Sergius I; On April 10, 689, Sergius I baptised King Caedwalla of Wessex in Rome. He also ordained Saint Willibrord as bishop of the Frisians, and the Liber Pontificalis states he also ordained Berthwald as Archbishop of Canterbury. Pope Saint Sergius I (c. 650 – September 8, 701) was pope from 687 to 701. Selected to end a schism between Antipope Paschal and Antipope Theodore, Sergius I ended the last disputed sede vacante of the Byzantine Papacy.
In 693, St. Willibrord went to Rome to seek papal approval for his labors, Pope Sergius I (r. 687-701) gave his full approbation and, during Willibrord's second Roman visit, the pontiff consecrated him archbishop to the Frisians, in 696, with his see at Utrecht.

100 AD 'Saint Prosdocimus (Prosdecimus) of Padua' venerated as the first bishop of Padua. Of Greek origin, tradition holds that he was sent from Antioch by Saint Peter the Apostle.
Patávii deposítio sancti Prosdócimi, qui fuit primus ejúsdem civitátis Epíscopus.  Hic, a beáto Petro Apóstolo Epíscopus ordinátus, ad prædicándum Dei verbum ad prædíctam civitátem missus est; ibíque, multis virtútibus et prodígiis corúscans, beáto fine quiévit.
    At Padua, the death of St. Prosdocimus, consecrated as first bishop of that city by the blessed apostle Peter.  He was sent to that city to preach the word of God and there he died a holy death, celebrated for many virtues and miracles.
Thus, he is often depicted in art with this Apostle. The cathedral at Feltre is dedicated to him and Saint Peter the Apostle, and the artist Il Pordenone (c. 1483 - 1539) created a work depicting Prosdocimus with Peter. He evangelized the region and is said to have founded the parish church at Isola Vicentina. His tomb is situated at the basilica of Santa Giustina at Padua. The chapel dedicated to him there was built over his tomb outside the walls of Padua. The church also once contained the relics of Prosdocimus's deacon, Saint Daniel, though these were moved to the Paduan church of Santa Sofia in the 11th century.

St. Auctus unknown Martyrs with Taurio and Thessalonica
Amphípoli, in Macedónia, sanctórum Mártyrum Aucti, Tauriónis et Thessalonícæ.
    At Amphipolis in Macedonia, the holy martyrs Auctus, Taurio, and Thessalonica.
They were slain at Amphipolis in Macedonia.
Auctus, Taurion & Thessalonica MM (RM) This trio was martyred at Amphipolis in Macedonia (Benedictines).
Saint Thessalonikia was the daughter of a pagan priest. When the impious father learned that his daughter was become a Christian, he ruthlessly beat her and threw her out of the house, bereft of any means of providing for herself. Saints Auktos and Taurion attempted to intercede for the girl and to reason with the embittered father. The pagan priest denounced them both to the authorities, and they were arrested. Having confessed their faith in Christ afront the torturers and having undergone cruel tortures, the saints were then beheaded. Soon after their martyr's death, Saint Thessalonikia also died. Her body was reverently buried in the city of Amphypolis in Macedonia, together with the holy Martyrs Auktos and Taurion
3rd v. Amaranthus of Albi Saint Gregory of Tours attests to the martyrdom M (RM)
Eódem die sancti Amaránthi Mártyris, qui apud Albigénsem urbem, in Gállia, exácto agónis fidélis cursu, sepúltus, vivit in glória.
    The same day, St. Amaranthus, martyr.  After successfully fulfilling the course of his trials he was buried in the city of Albi, but lives in eternal glory.

Saint Gregory of Tours attests to the martyrdom of Saint Amaranthus, who is venerated at Albi in southern France. Nothing further is known about him (Benedictines).

300 St. Hieron Martyr with Hesychius & 31 Armenians Nicander, and thirty Armenians. They suffered at Melitene.
Melitínæ, in Arménia, pássio sanctórum Hierónis, Nicándri, Hesychii et aliórum trigínta; qui in persecutióne Diocletiáni, sub Lysia Præside, coronáti sunt.
    At Melitina in Armenia, the martyrdom of the Saints Hiero, Nicander, Hesychius, and thirty others, who were crowned in the persecution of Diocletian under the governor Lysias.
33 Martyrs at Meletina: Hieron, Hesykhios, Nikander, Athanasias, Mamant, Barakhios, Kallinikos, Theagenes, Nikon, Longinos, Theodore, Ualerios, Xanthos, Theodoulos, Kallimakhos, Eugene, Theodokhos, Ostrykhias, Epiphanios, Maximian, Ducitios, Claudian, Theophilos, Gigantios, Dorotheos, Theodotos, Castrikhios, Anyketos, Themelios, Eutykhios, Hilarion, Diodotos and Amonites (III). Martyr Athenodoros. Saint Gregory. Monk Zosima of Vorbozomsk. Uncovering of Relics of Monk Kirill (Cyril) of Novoezersk and Novgorod (1649). Martyr Theodotos the Tavern-keeper (+ 303). Martyrs Melasippos and Kasynia and their son Antoninos (+ 363). Martyrs Auktos, Taurion and Thessalonkia. Monk Lazaros of Galiseia (+ 1053). Icon of the Mother of God "Leaping with Joy" ("Vzygranie") (1795).

The Holy Martyr Hieron was born in the city of Tiana in great Cappadocia. Raised by a pious mother, he was a kindly and good Christian.

The co-ruling emperors Diocletian and Maximian (284-305) sent to Cappadocia a large military detachment headed by Lyzias to eradicate the wide-spread Christianity there, and also, to conscript into the imperial army healthy and strong soldiers. Amidst the many others, Lyzias gave orders also to draft into military service Hieron, who was distinguished by his great physical strength and dexterity. But Hieron refused to serve emperors who would persecute Christians. When they attempted to grab hold of him by force and bring him to Lyzias, he took hold a beam of wood, and sent scattering the soldiers who had been sent to bring him. He then hid himself away in a cave, together with eighteen others of like mind. Lyzias would not risk losing his soldiers assaulting the cave even by storming it. Upon the advice of Kyriakos, one of the friends of Hieron, Lyzias lifted the siege of the cave and withdrew his detachment. Then Kyriakos, having reassured Hieron, persuaded him not to offer resistance to the authorities; and he together with the other new conscripts amidst accompanying soldiers were dispatched to the nearby city of Meletina. Soon Hieron had a vision in his sleep, in which was foretold him his imminent martyr's end. Lyzias proposed to the soldiers gathered at Meletina that they offer sacrifice to the pagan gods. Hieron and behind him another 32 soldiers refused to do this, and openly they confessed their faith in Christ. Then the persecutor gave orders to beat the martyrs, and to cut off the hand of Hieron. After cruel tortures they threw the barely alive martyrs into prison, and in the morning they beheaded them.

A certain rich and illustrious Christian by the name of Chrysanthos ransomed the head of Hieron from Lyzias. And when the persecutions finally ceased, he built a church on the place where they executed the holy martyrs, and he placed the venerable head therein. The bodies of all the executed saints were secretly buried by Christians. During the reign of the emperor Justinian later on, amidst the construction of a church in the name of Saint Irene, the venerable relics were uncovered undecayed.
313 St. Achillas Bishop of Alexandria; theologian lived in era of dispute in Church
Alexandríæ beáti Achíllæ Epíscopi, qui eruditióne, fide, conversatióne ac móribus fuit insígnis.
    At Alexandria, the blessed Achilles, bishop, renowned for his learning, faith, and purity of life.
Achillas was the bishop in Egypt, one of the most powerful cities in the world at the time. Succeeding as bishop a man named St. Peter the Martyr, Achillas ordained Arius, who was to begin the influential heresy of Arianism. When Achillas recognized the untruths in Arius' preaching, he took steps to defend the faith and was attacked by Arius and another heretical group called the Meletians. Achillas remained firm in the faith.
A council held in Alexandria condemned Arius forced him to flee to Palestine. Achillas, did not live to see this condemnation.

Achillas of Alexandria B (RM). Saint Achillas, successor to Bishop Saint Peter of Alexandria, Egypt, ordained to the priesthood the man who afterwards became world famous as the heresiarch Arius. Saint Athanasius praised Achillas for the purity of his doctrine when he maligned by the party of Meletius (Benedictines).

360 St. Melasippus Martyr with Carina, his wife, and Anthony, their son
Ancyræ, in Galátia, pássio sanctórum Melasíppi, Antónii et Carínæ, sub Juliáno Apóstata.
    At Ancyra in Galatia, the martyrdom of Saints Melasippus, Anthony and Carina, under Julian the Apostate.
They suffered at Ancyra. Melasippus and Carina died under torture. Anthony was beheaded.
The Holy Martyrs Melasippos and Kasynia and their son Antoninos suffered during the reign of the emperor Julian the Apostate in the city of Ancyra in Phrygia in the year 363. The holy Martyrs Melasippos and Kasynia, lacerated by iron hooks and exhausted, died under torture. Their son the lad Antoninos, whom the persecutor forced to watch the torturing of his parents, spat in the face of the God-apostate emperor. For this he was subjected to cruel tortures, in which he remained unharmed, and then he was beheaded. And forty other youths, witnessing that the Lord had preserved His confessor Antoninos unharmed by tortures, believed in Christ, and they openly confessed their faith and accepted death by martyrdom.
400 St. Rufus of Metz  Bishop for nearly 3 decades
Metis, in Gállia, sancti Rufi, Epíscopi et Confessóris.    At Metz, St. Rufus, bishop and confessor.
It is possible that he is the same Rufus of Metz who took part in the Priscillianist Controversy.
St. Tremorus murdered while still an infant by his father 6th century
Count Canmore of Brittany. His mother was St. Triphina.

547 ST HERCULANUS, BISHOP OF PERUGIA, MARTYR
WHEN the Goths took the city of Perugia after beleaguering it off and on for seven years King Totila ordered that the bishop, Herculanus, should be put to death in most barbarous fashion: a strip of skin was to be pulled off him from his crown to his heels before he was beheaded. The officer entrusted with the execution had the humanity to cut off his head before flaying him, and the body was then thrown off the walls into the fosse. Christians hastily buried it there with the severed head, but when they disinterred it forty days later for translation to the church of St Peter, the head, St Gregory the Great says, was found attached to the trunk with no sign of separation.
   When the Goths captured Tifernum (Città di Castello) a young deacon had taken refuge in Perugia and was there made priest by St Herculanus. He was afterwards bishop of Tifernum, and as St Floridus he is commemorated on the 13th of this month. The Perugians venerate also another St Herculanus, bishop of their city, who, they say, was a Syrian who came to Rome and was sent to evangelize Perugia, where he was put to death for the faith. This Herculanus is probably a duplication of the one mentioned above.
The Bollandists hold that there was only one St Herculanus connected with Perugia, and they discuss the matter primarily on March 1, quoting the notice in the dialogues of St Gregory the Great. They have also a brief reference to the same matter in their third volume for November, p. 322. The story of the miracle, and Bonfigli's frescoes in the Palazzo del Municipio, have helped to perpetuate the memory of Herculanus.
St. Cumgar Monastic founder 6th or 8th century
possibly identified with St. Docuinus. A native of Devon, he founded monasteries at Budgworth, Somerset, England, and at West Glamorgan, Wales. He was buried at Somerset.

675 St. Gebetrude Third abbess of the Benedictine Abbey of Remiremont
France, also listed as Gertrude. Her cult was approved by Pope St. Leo IX in 1051.

693 St. Florentius of Strasbourg Irish bishop curing the blind and deaf
Argentoráti sancti Floréntii Epíscopi.    At Strasbourg, St. Florentius, bishop.
of Strasbourg, France. He went to Alsace and there he became a hermit on Mount Ringelberg. After curing the blind and deaf daughter of St. King Dagobert II, he had the king’s patronage in founding a monastery. He was appointed the bishop of Strasbourg and founded St. Thomas Monastery, mostly staffed by Irish.
7th v. ST FLORENTIUS, BISHOP OF STRASBURG
ST FLORENTIUS is said to have been an Irishman, who came to Alsace (of which he is venerated as an apostle) and settled as a hermit in a valley at the foot of the Ringelberg. From thence he preached to the neighbouring people, and, having healed King Dagobert’s daughter, who was a blind-mute, the king enabled him to found a monastery near by, at Haslach. After he had become bishop, about 678, many Irish monks and others came to St Florentius at Strasburg. For these he built a house outside the walls, dedicated in honour of St Thomas the Apostle, which became a monastery under the Irish rule and later a collegiate chapter of canons.
The twelfth-century Life of St Florentius, which is printed in the Acta Sanctorum, November, vol. iii, with a full discussion of the difficulties involved, is of no historical value. The date of the saint’s death, whether towards the close of the seventh or the beginning of the eighth century must be left quite indeterminate. As Dom Gougaud makes no mention of Florentius either in his Gaelic Pioneers of Christianity (1923) or in his Saints irlandais hors d’Irlande (1936) it may be assumed that he discredits the saint’s supposed Irish origin. See also Duchesne, Fastes Épiscopaux, vol. iii, p. 171; and M. Barth, Der hi. Florentius von Strassburg (1952).
700 St. Amarand Bishop and Benedictine abbot
Amarand was the abbot of Moissac Monastery until becoming the bishop of Albi, in France, about 700.
Amarand of Albi, OSB B (AC). Saint Amarand, abbot of Moissac, was raised to the see of of Albi, France, sometime between 689 and 722 (Benedictines).

739 St. Willibrord Apostle of Frisia Netherlands missionary archbishop Apostle of the Frisians
In Frísia deposítio sancti Willibrórdi, Epíscopi Trajecténsis; qui, a beáto Sérgio Papa ordinátus Epíscopus, in Frísia et Dánia Evangélium prædicávit.
    In Friesland, the death of St. Willibrord, bishop of Utrecht, who was consecrated bishop by blessed Pope Sergius, and preached the Gospel in Friesland and Denmark.

739 ST WILLIBRORD, BISHOP OF UTRECHT
ST WILLIBRORD was born in Northumbria in the year 658, and placed before he was seven years old in the monastery of Ripon, which was at that time governed by St Wilfrid. In his twentieth year he went over to Ireland, where he joined St Egbert and St Wigbert who had gone thither to study in the monastic schools and lead a more perfect life among their monks. In their company he spent twelve years in the study of the sacred sciences. St Egbert was anxious to preach the gospel in northern Germany but was prevented, and his companion Wigbert came back to Ireland after spending two fruitless years on this mission. Thereupon Willibrord, who was then thirty-one, and had been ordained priest a year before, expressed a desire to be allowed to undertake this laborious and dangerous task,  and was accordingly sent out with eleven other monks, Englishmen, among whom was St Swithbert.

They landed in 690 at the mouth of the Rhine, made their way to Utrecht, and then to the court of Pepin of Herstal, who encouraged them to preach in Lower Friesland, between the Meuse and the sea, which he had conquered from the heathen Radbod.

Willibrord set out for Rome and cast himself at the feet of Pope St Sergius I, begging his authority to preach the gospel to idolatrous nations. The pope granted him ample jurisdiction and gave him relics for the consecration of churches. He then returned and with his companions preached the gospel with success in that part of Friesland that had been conquered by the Franks. St Swithbert was consecrated as bishop by St Wilfrid in England, but perhaps Pepin did not approve of this, for Swithbert soon went off up the Rhine to preach to the Boructvari; and Pepin soon sent St Willibrord to Rome, with letters of recom­mendation that he might be ordained bishop. Pope Sergius still sat in St Peter’s chair and he received him with honour, changed his name to Clement and ordained him bishop of the Frisians in St Cecilia’s basilica on her feast-day in the year 695. St Willibrord stayed only fourteen days in Rome, and coming back to Utrecht built there the church of our Saviour, in which he fixed his see.

The bishop’s indefatigable application to the conversion of souls seemed to prove that, with the new obligation he had received at his consecration of labouring to enlarge the kingdom of his Master, he had acquired fresh strength and zeal. Some years after his consecration, assisted by the liberality of Pepin and the abbess St Irmina, he founded the abbey of Echternach in Luxemburg, which soon became an im­portant centre of his influence.

Willibrord extended his labours into Upper Friesland, which still obeyed Radbod, and penetrated into Denmark, but with no more success than to purchase thirty young Danish boys, whom he instructed, baptized and brought back with him. In his return, according to Alcuin, he was driven by stress of weather upon the island of Heligoland, revered as a holy place by the Danes and Frisians. It was looked upon as a sacrilege for anyone to kill any living creature on that island, to eat anything that grew on it, or to draw water out of a spring there without observing strict silence. St Willibrord, to undeceive the inhabitants, killed some of the beasts for his companions to eat and baptized three persons in the fountain, pronouncing the words very loudly. The idolaters expected to see them go mad or drop down dead, and when no such judgement befell could not determine whether this was to be attributed to the patience of their god or to his want of power. They informed Radbod, who ordered lots to be cast for the person who should appease the god, so that one of Willibrord’s company was sacrificed to the superstition of the people and died a martyr for Jesus Christ. The saint, upon leaving Heligoland, went ashore on Walcheren and his charity and patience made considerable conquests to the Christian religion there. He overthrew and destroyed an idol, whereupon he was attacked by its outraged priest who tried to kill the missionary, but he escaped and returned in safety to Utrecht. In 714 Charles Martel’s son Pepin the Short, afterwards king of the Franks, was born, and baptized by St Willibrord, who on that occasion is related by Alcuin to have prophesied that the child would surpass in glory all his ancestors.

In 715 Radbod regained the parts of Frisia he had lost, and undid much of Willibrord’s work, destroying churches, killing missionaries and inducing many apostasies. For a time Willibrord retired, but after the death of Radbod in 719 he was at full liberty to preach in every part of the country. He was joined in his apostolical labours by St Boniface, who spent three years in Friesland before he went into Germany. Bede says, when he wrote his history in 731,

“Willibrord, surnamed Clement, is still living, venerable in his old age, having been bishop thirty-six years, and sighing after the rewards of the heavenly life after many spiritual conflicts.
Willi­brord was to England what Columbanus had been to Ireland. He inaugurated a century of English spiritual influence on the continent”. (W. Levison).

He was, says Bd Alcuin, of a becoming stature, venerable in his aspect, comely in his person, graceful and always cheerful in his speech and countenance, wise in his counsel, unwearied in preaching and all apostolic works, amidst which he was careful to nourish the interior life of his soul by public prayer, meditation and reading. By the prayers and labours of this apostle and his col­leagues the faith was planted in many parts of Holland, Zeeland, and the Nether­lands, whither St Amand and St Lebwin had never penetrated; and the Frisians, till then a rough and barbarous people, became more civilized and virtuous. He is commonly called the Apostle of the Frisians, a title to which he has every claim; but it must not be lost sight of that in the earlier days of the mission St Swithbert also played a very considerable part and seems in some degree to have been its leader. And the Frisians, like other nations, were not converted with the speed and in the numbers that medieval hagiographers would have us believe. Willi­brord was to England what Columbanus had been to Ireland. He inaugurated a century of English spiritual influence on the continent”. (W. Levison).

It had always been St Willibrord’s habit to go from time to time to his monastery at Echternach for periods of retreat, and in his old age he made it his place of permanent retirement. There he died at the age of eighty-one on November 7, 739, and was buried in the abbey church, which has ever since been a place of pilgrimage. In connection with the shrine there takes place every Whit-Tuesday a curious observance called the Springende Heiligen, the Dancing Saints. Its true origin is unknown, but it is known to have taken place regularly (except from 1786 till 1802) from at least 1553 until the present day. It consists of a procession from a bridge over the Sure to St Willibrord’s shrine. The participants, four or five abreast and hand-fasted or arm-in-arm, proceed with a hopping or dancing motion, in which for every three steps forward they take two back, in time to a traditional tune played by bands. Priests, religious, and even bishops take part, and the ceremony ends with benediction of the Blessed Sacrament. Whatever its origin, the procession is now penitential in character and intercessory on behalf of those suffering from epilepsy and similar maladies. St Willibrord’s feast is kept in the diocese of Hexham as well as in Holland.

The account of St Willibrord contributed to the Acta Sanctorum, November, vol. iii, by Fr A. Poncelet, is worthy of all praise, not only for its clear statement, but for its complete mastery of the facts and of the whole period. He recalls the tributes paid to St Willibrord by his contemporaries St Bede, St Boniface, etc., and prints entire a critically revised text of the life by Alcuin as also of that by Theofrid, abbot of Echternach, though this last adds very little to our reliable historical data. A point of special interest is the fact that in what is known as the “Epternach MS.” of the Hieronymianum (now MS. Paris Latin 10837) a calendar is prefixed which contains a note written by Willibrord himself in 728, stating that he, “ Clement”, came over the sea in 690 and was consecrated bishop by Pope Sergius at Rome in 695. See on this and other points of detail the Calendar of St Willibrord edited for the Henry Bradshaw Society by H. A. Wilson (1918). There are also good notices of St Willibrord in DNB. (by Mrs Tout) and DCB. On the dancing procession at Echternach consult Fr John Morris in The Month, December, 1892, pp. 495—513, and Krier, Die Spring­prozession in Echternach (1870). A Life of St Willibrord in English, prepared originally for J. H. Newman’s Anglican series (? by Fr T. Meyrick), was published anonymously in 1877. The more important texts concerned with the saint have also been edited by W. Levison, whose conclusions in nearly all cases agree with those of Fr Poncelet, notably in his acceptance of the genuineness of the so-called “will” of St Willibrord. As recently as 1934 Levison has included in the continuation of the MGH., Scriptores, vol. xxx (pp. 1368—1371), a collection of the miracles attributed to him. Some of the reputed relics of the saint have come to light in the church of St Gertrude at Utrecht, and have been described by W. J. A. Visser, on which see the Analecta Bollandiana, vol. lii (1934), pp. 436—437. See also G. H. Verbist, St Willibrord, apâtre des Pays-Bas (1939); and W. Levison, England and the Continent...(1946), especially pp. 53—69. The life by Alcuin is translated by C. H. Talbot in Anglo-Saxon Missionaries in Germany (1954).
Born in Northumbria, England, circa 658, he studied at Ripon monastery under St. Wilfrid and spent twelve years studying in Ireland at the abbey of Rathmelsigi (most likely Mellifont, County Louth) under Sts. Egbert and Wigbert. After receiving ordination and extensive training in the field of the missions, he set out about 690 with a dozen companions for Frisia, or Friesland.
In 693, St.
Willibrord went to Rome to seek papal approval for his labors, Pope Sergius I (r. 687-701) gave his full approbation and, during Willibrord's second Roman visit, the pontiff consecrated him archbishop to the Frisians, in 696, with his see at Utrecht. In his work, Willibrord also received much support and encouragement from the Frankish leader; Pepin of Heristal (r. 687-714). Willibrord founded the monastery of Echternach, Luxembourg, to serve as a center of missionary endeavors, and extended the efforts of missionaries into Denmark and Upper Friesland. He faced chronic dangers from outraged pagans, including one who nearly murdered him after he tore down a pagan idol.
In 714, Duke Radbod reclaimed the extensive territories acquired by Pepin, and Willilbrord watched all of the progress he had made be virtually undone. After Radbod's death, Willibrord started over with great enthusiasm, receiving invaluable assistance, from St. Boniface. Willibrord died on retreat at Echternach on November 7. For his efforts, he is called the Apostle of the Frisians.

9th v. St. Blinlivet 25 bishop of Vannes asceticism and prayerfulness 9th century
The twenty-fifth bishop of Vannes, in Brittany, France. He became a monk after his retirement and was noted for his asceticism and prayerfulness.

1053 The Monk Lazaros of Galiseia was born in Lydia, in the city of Magnesium; The brethren buried the body of the saint at the pillar, upon which he had pursued asceticism. The saint was glorified by many miracles after his death;

As a youth educated and loving God, Lazaros became a monk at the monastery of Saint Sava, the founder of great ascetic piety in Palestine. The monk spent ten years within the walls of the monastery, winning the love and respect of the brethren for his intense monastic effort.

Ordained presbyter by the Jerusalem Patriarch, the Monk Lazaros returned to his native country and settled not far from Ephesus, on desolate Mount Galiseia. Here he was granted a wondrous vision: a fiery pillar, rising up to the heavens, was encircled by Angels, singing: "Let God arise and let His enemies be scattered". On the place where this vision appeared to the saint, he built a church in honour of the Resurrection of Christ and took upon himself the feat of pillar-dwelling. Monks soon began to flock to the great ascetic, thirsting for wise spiritual nourishment by the Divinely-inspired word and blessed example of the saint. Thus arose a monastery.

Having received a revelation about his impeding end, the monk related this to the brethren, but through the tearful prayers of all, the Lord prolonged the earthly life of Saint Lazaros for another 15 years.

The Monk Lazaros died at 72 years of age, in the year 1053. The brethren buried the body of the saint at the pillar, upon which he had pursued asceticism. The saint was glorified by many miracles after his death.

St. Ernest Abbot Benedictine Abbey of Zwiefalten martyr Crusades Mecca
There is very little known about St. Ernest; Ernest was the Abbot of the Benedictine Abbey of Zwiefalten in Germany. He went on the Crusades, preached in Arabia and Persia, and was captured by the Moors. He was tortured to death in Mecca.

1225 St. Engelbert Archbishop of Cologne martyr
Apud Swelménsem civitátem, in Germánia, pássio sancti Engelbérti, Epíscopi Coloniénsis, qui, cum illuc ex óppido Sosátio ad templum dedicándum pérgeret, a sicáriis intercéptus in via multísque vulnéribus cæsus, gloriósum pro defensióne ecclesiásticæ libertátis et Románæ Ecclésiæ obediéntia martyrium súbiit.
    At Schwelm in Germany, the martyrdom of St. Engelbert, bishop of Cologne.  He was on his way from that city to the town of Essen in order to consecrate a church, when he was set upon by ruffians on the road and slain by their many blows.  Thus he suffered martyrdom in defence of Church liberty and for obedience to the Roman Church.
Germany, slain by hired assassins and venerated as a martyr. He was the son of the count of Berg and became the possessor of many benefices. Engelbert was excommunicated but was restored into union with the Church. He became the archbishop of Cologne in 1217, at the age of thirty. In this office he proved his mettle and became tutor to the son of Emperor Frederick II. In 1222 he crowned Henry King of the Romans. Engelbert was slain by his cousin Frederick, whom he had thwarted in an attempt to steal from the nuns of Essen. Engelbert was ambushed at Gevelsberg and murdered on November 7.

1225 ST ENGELBERT, ARCHBISHOP OF COLOGNE, MARTYR
AMONG the ecclesiastical abuses rife in the middle ages was the presentation of youths, and even children, to church benefices, and often more than one at a time. This Engelbert, who doubtless owed his preferment to the fact that his father was the powerful count of Berg, provides a characteristic example. While still a boy at the Cologne cathedral-school he was provost of St Mary’s at Aachen and of St George’s, of St Severinus, and of the cathedral at Cologne itself. His youthful life was not at all in accordance with his obligations and he was excommunicated for taking up arms against the Emperor Otto IV. For a short time he joined the crusade against the Albigensians; and then, playing his cards skilfully between two claimants, was himself consecrated to the see of Cologne in 1217. He was only about thirty years old and the great diocese had suffered severely from political and ecclesiastical upheavals. Nevertheless, Engelbert was well endowed with the natural qualities necessary for his task, a keen judgement, regard for justice, strong will and commanding presence. And after his excommunication was raised his personal life was blameless, though bad it not been for his violent end in defence of a religious house it is doubtful if his cultus would have ever arisen or been officially recognized.

Engelbert welcomed both the Friars Minor and the Dominicans to the diocese, and held synods for the maintenance of discipline among the clergy, both secular and regular. He was popular with the people, for he was affable, generous to the poor, and peace-loving in spite of his firmness. But his time was in the main taken up by affairs of state. He supported the Hohenstaufen emperor, Frederick II, and when in 1220 Frederick went to Sicily he appointed Engelbert regent during the minority of his son, Henry. This boy of twelve was crowned king of the Romans by his guardian at Aachen in 1222. St Engelbert discharged his duties with vigour and determination, but, while earning the love and respect of King Henry, his firm justice raised up many powerful enemies, especially among his own kinsfolk.

St Engelbert’s cousin, Count Frederick of Isenberg, took advantage of his position as administrator for the nuns of Essen to steal their property and oppress their vassals. Engelbert called him to order and restitution, and Frederick laid a plot to murder his cousin. St Engelbert was warned of his danger, and he took precautions, but on November 7, 1225, he set out to go from Soest to Schwein with an inadequate escort. At the Gevelsberg he was set upon by Frederick of Isenberg, with other aggrieved nobles and half a hundred soldiers, and was left dead with forty-seven wounds in his body. Young King Henry had Count Frederick brought to justice, and the papal legate, Cardinal von Urach, declared that Engelbert was a martyr. He has never been formally canonized but his feast was instituted at Cologne and his name admitted to the Roman Martyrology.

There is a life by Caesarius of Heisterbach, a contemporary, which has been edited in the Acta Sanctorum for November, vol. iii. The Regesta of the diocese of Cologne also supply useful information; the relevant texts were published in 1909 by R. Knipping, forming vol. iii of the series. Two or three dispatches from the English envoy, Walter, Bishop of Carlisle, printed in the Letters of Henry III (Rolls Series), show that Engelbert of Cologne just before his death was on very friendly terms with England. See also the German biographies by J. Ficker (1853) and H. Foerster (1925).

1280 BD MARGARET COLONNA, VIRGIN; had the gift of miracles, and other unusual graces are recorded of her

MARGARET was daughter of Prince Odo Colonna, but losing both her parents when a child she was brought up under the care of her two brothers. She refused the marriage arranged for her, and lived a retired life with two attendants in a villa at Palestrina, devoting her time and her goods to the relief of the sick and poor. It was her intention to join the Poor Clares in their house at Assisi, but sickness prevented this, and she conceived the idea of establishing a convent at Palestrina.
   Her younger brother, James, who had been created cardinal (and so is distinguished as dignior frater from her senior frater, John, who wrote her life), obtained the pope’s
permission and the community was given the rule of the Poor Clare nuns as modified by Urban IV. But it would seem that, on account of ill-health, Bd Margaret herself neither governed nor was professed in this convent; for the last seven years of her life she suffered from a malignant growth, bearing continual pain with the greatest courage and patience. She had the gift of miracles, and other unusual graces are recorded of her. After her death at an early age the nuns of Palestrina removed into the City to San Silvestro in Capite, taking the body of their foundress with them. When this monastery was turned into a general post office seven hundred years later the relics were translated to the nuns’ new home at St Cecilia in Trastevere. Pope Pius IX confirmed the cultus of Bd Margaret Colonna in 1847.

The Franciscan Chroniclers, such as Wadding and Mark of Lisbon, have published full accounts of Bd Margaret; the story is told in detail in, e.g. Mazzara, Leggendario Francescano (1680), vol. ii Pt. 2, pp. 775—780. In B. Margherita Colonna (1935) Fr L. Oliger edited and introduced an unpublished MS. of the fourteenth century, which combines parts of vitae by John Colonna (d. c. 1292) and by a Poor Clare of San Silvestro (fl 1290). For English readers there is an account available in Léon, Auréole Séraphique Eng. trans.), vol. iv, pp. 170—173.
1300 BD MATTHIA OF MATELICA, VIRGIN Miracles incorrupt in 1756; Miracles became so frequent at her grave that the body was soon moved to a tomb beside the high altar of the chapel, where her veneration was continued without interrup­tion. In 1756 the tomb had to be moved on account of repairs, and the Bishop of Camerino took the opportunity to examine the relics; the body was found to be incorrupt and giving off a pleasant smell. It was re-enshrined under the altar of St Cecilia, and since then miracles have again been reported there.
AT the town of Matelica in the March of Ancona there is a monastery of Poor Clare nuns whose origin is said to go back to about the year 1233, when St Clare was still living; this ancient convent was dedicated in honour of St Mary Magdalene, but since 1758 has been known as Bd Matthia’s. This beata was born in Matelica about the same time as the convent was founded, the only child of Count Gentile Nazzarei, who naturally wished his daughter to marry and perpetuate his house. She, however, was called to be a nun and offered herself to the abbess of Santa Maria Maddalena, who was related to Count Gentile and refused to receive her without her father’s consent. According to an old tradition Matthia thereupon went into the convent chapel, changed her secular clothes for a religious habit, cut off her hair, and there offered herself to Christ before a crucifix. Count Gentile found her thus, and was reluctantly persuaded to give his permission. Nothing is known of the life in religion of Bd Matthia except vague generalities. She filled the office of abbess for forty years, and died on December 28, 1300. Miracles became so frequent at her grave that the body was soon moved to a tomb beside the high altar of the chapel, where her veneration was continued without interrup­tion. In 1756 the tomb had to be moved on account of repairs, and the Bishop of Camerino took the opportunity to examine the relics; the body was found to be incorrupt and giving off a pleasant smell. It was re-enshrined under the altar of St Cecilia, and since then miracles have again been reported there. In particular, the body is said to have exuded from time to time a sweet-smelling, blood-like liquid, especially when a member of the community is going to die. The cultus of Bd Matthia was confirmed in 1765. It must be added that it is said by some that the Matelica convent was founded for Benedictine nuns and became Franciscan only after the lifetime of Bd Matthia, which is put earlier.
Full accounts of the beata are available in nearly all the Franciscan chroniclers. Mazzara commemorates her in June; see the Leggendario Francescano, pt I (1676), pp. 875—876. There are Italian lives by G. Baldassini (1852), and by Vincent de Porto San Giorgio (1877). See also Leon, Aureole Séraphique (Eng. trans.), vol. i, pp. 332—338; and cf. A. M. Zimmer­mann, Kalendarium Benedictinum, vol. iii (1937).

1365 BD PETER OF RUFFIA, MARTYR; nominated inquisitor general for Piedmont, Upper Lombardy and Liguria. Several sects were active in northern Italy at that time, particularly the Waldensians, and for fourteen years Bd Peter laboured among them. The measure of his success was also the measure of the hatred which the more stubborn heretics had for him.
THE Friars Preachers, especially during the mastership of Humbert of Romans, were very reluctant to accept offices in the Inquisition, and particularly after the murder of St Peter of Verona in 1242 urged the Holy See to relieve them from this service. Their request was not granted, and during the second half of the four­teenth century these duties brought more martyrs to the order. Bd Peter of Ruffia, a member of the Piedmontese family of the Cambiani, joined the Dominicans, and in 1351 was nominated inquisitor general for Piedmont, Upper Lombardy and Liguria.

   Several sects were active in northern Italy at that time, particularly the Waldensians, and for fourteen years Bd Peter laboured among them. The measure of his success was also the measure of the hatred which the more stubborn heretics had for him. While he was staying at Susa in 1365 some sectaries attacked him and put him to death. Peter was at once venerated as a martyr, and this cultus was confirmed in 1856.

The Bollandists in the Acta Sanctorum, November, vol. iii, complain that little was to be learnt of the history of this martyr, but they were able to print a contemporary legal instrument, issued by the bishop of Turin, which authorized another bishop to reconcile and reconsecrate the Franciscan cloister which had been the scene of the violent death of Bd Peter. See also Procter, Lives of the Dominican Saints, pp. 313—314.
1463 St. Didacusis living proof that God “chose what is foolish in the world to shame the wise; God chose what is weak in the world to shame the strong” (1 Corinthians 1:27).
(1400-1463)
Didacus is living proof that God “chose what is foolish in the world to shame the wise; God chose what is weak in the world to shame the strong” (1 Corinthians 1:27).
    As a young man in Spain, Didacus joined the Secular Franciscan Order and lived for some time as a hermit. After Didacus became a Franciscan brother, he developed a reputation for great insight into God’s ways. His penances were heroic. He was so generous with the poor that the friars sometimes grew uneasy about his charity.  Didacus volunteered for the missions in the Canary Islands and labored there energetically and profitably. He was also the superior of a friary there.
   In 1450 he was sent to Rome to attend the canonization of St. Bernardine of Siena. When many friars gathered for that celebration fell sick, Didacus stayed in Rome for three months to nurse them. After he returned to Spain, he pursued a life of contemplation full-time. He showed the friars the wisdom of God’s ways.
As he was dying, Didacus looked at a crucifix and said: “O faithful wood, O precious nails! You have borne an exceedingly sweet burden, for you have been judged worthy to bear the Lord and King of heaven” (Marion A. Habig, O.F.M., The Franciscan Book of Saints, p. 834).
San Diego, California, is named for this Franciscan, who was canonized in 1588.
Comment: We cannot be neutral about genuinely holy people. We either admire them or we consider them foolish. Didacus is a saint because he used his life to serve God and God’s people. Can we say the same for ourselves?
Quote: “He was born in Spain with no outstanding reputation for learning, but like our first teachers and leaders unlettered as men count wisdom, an unschooled person, a humble lay brother in religious life. [God chose Didacus] to show in him the abundant riches of his grace to lead many on the way of salvation by the holiness of his life and by his example and to prove over and over to a weary old world almost decrepit with age that God's folly is wiser than men, and his weakness is more powerful than men”. (Bull of Canonization).
 1717 Bl. Anthony Baldinucci Jesuit missionary preacher; His father, painter and writer by profession, after recovery from an illness, which he attributed to the intercession of St Antony of Padua, vowed his next child to that saint; and when a boy was born in 1665, appropriately within the octave of his feast, he had him baptized Antony and brought up with the idea of becoming a priest. The Baldinucci family lived in the same house in the via degli Angeli at Florence in which St Aloysius Gonzaga had lived for a time when a child, and the intimate memory of this young saint had much influence on the growing Antony. When he was sixteen he offered himself to the Society of Jesus and was accepted, in spite of his rather uncertain health.
He was born in Florence, Italy, in 1665, the son of an author and artist, and was destined for the priesthood by his father. Entering the Jesuits in 1681, Anthony taught at Rome and Terni, Italy. Ordained at the age of thirty, he began missionary work in Viterbo and Trascanti, Italy, ministering to the poor while conducting missions. Anthony conducted more than five hundred such missions, at times leading processions while carrying a cross and scourging himself. He died on November 7, 1717, and was beatified in 1893.
Blessed Antony Baldinucci, SJ (AC). After becoming a Jesuit in 1681, Antony evangelized the area of Colli Albani near Rome. He used very unconventional methods of preaching and calling people to penance (Benedictines).

1717    BD ANTONY BALDINUCCI
ON this day the Society of Jesus and several Italian dioceses that profited by his labours keep the feast of this Bd Antony, the fifth son of Philip Baldinucci and Catherine Scolari, of Florence. His father, painter and writer by profession, after recovery from an illness, which he attributed to the intercession of St Antony of Padua, vowed his next child to that saint; and when a boy was born in 1665, appropriately within the octave of his feast, he had him baptized Antony and brought up with the idea of becoming a priest. The Baldinucci family lived in the same house in the via degli Angeli at Florence in which St Aloysius Gonzaga had lived for a time when a child, and the intimate memory of this young saint had much influence on the growing Antony. When he was sixteen he offered himself to the Society of Jesus and was accepted, in spite of his rather uncertain health.

Antony hoped to be sent as a missionary to the Indies, but instead he was set to teach young men and give instructions to confraternities, first at Terni and then in Rome. A bout of seizures and bad headaches caused him to be sent back to Florence, and then to several country colleges, where his health improved and he began to preach, very successfully. When he was thirty he was ordained priest, and after he had completed his tertianship he asked if he might now go to the Indies. He was refused and sent to minister in Viterbo and Frascati, in whose neighbourhood he spent the remaining twenty years of his life, working principally among the poorer and uninstructed people. To attract them he adopted missionary methods that were, to put it mildly, demonstrative and startling, modelled on those of St Peter Claver among the Negroes and Bd Julian Maunoir among the Bretons. Bd Antony organized imposing processions from different places to the centre where the mission was being held, in which penitents walked wearing crowns of thorns and beating themselves with a discipline; he himself often preached carrying a heavy cross or wearing chains, and would strike the hearts of the people by going along the streets scourging himself violently. After a due impression had been made and he had got the people of a place to come and listen to him, he would modify his methods to a more usual pattern. To keep order in the crowds that flocked to his preaching he appointed lay marshals, often men of notoriously bad lives, who were thus flattered and brought to a more amenable frame of mind. Among the exterior results of his missions was generally a public burning of cards, dice, obscene pictures and other occasions of sin and excess. He found particularly widespread the evils of reckless gambling, violence arising from revenge, and lewdness of speech and action, and his zeal did not end in bonfires but brought about many real conversions and the establishment of organized good works.

Although he was incessantly engaged in preaching missions and the work ancillary thereto, Bd Antony wrote down numerous sermons and instructions and kept up a wide correspondence. He rarely slept more than three hours in a night, and then on a bed of planks, and fasted three days of every week; in view of his tremendous activity Pope Clement XI dispensed him from the daily recitation of the Divine Office, but Antony did not make use of the dispensation. In all he gave in twenty years 448 missions in thirteen dioceses of the Abruzzi and Romagna. In 1708 he was called to preach the Lent at Leghorn by order of Duke Cosimo III. Antony arrived bare-footed, in a tattered cassock, with his luggage on his back, and at first the gentry would not come to his sermons. But he won them in the end, and every Lent after he had to preach in some principal city. The year 1716 saw a terrible famine in central Italy, and Bd Antony was indefatigable in the work of relief. He was still only just over fifty, but he was literally worn out with work and hardly survived the strain of this additional effort. He died on November 7 in the following year. During a mission at Carpineto in 1710 he had stayed in the house of the Pecci, a family which afterwards gave a pope to the Church in the person of Leo XIII. By this pope Bd Antony Baldinucci was beatified in 1893.

The details of the history of Bd Antony are very fully known from the testimony of the witnesses in the process of beatification as well as from his own letters and other contem­porary documents. There is a satisfactory, if summary, account of these sources in the Acta Sanctorum, November, vol. iii. Within two and a half years of the missioner’s death a substantial biography had been published by Father F. M. Galluzzi. The best modern life is probably that by Father Vannucci (1893), but there are several others, e.g. by Father Goldie in English (1894). See also DHG., vol. iii, cc. 756—760. A large collection of Bd Antony’s letters was edited and published by Father L. Rosa in 1899.

1773 St. Hyacinth Castaneda Martyr of Vietnam a Dominican
Born in Setavo, Spain, he was sent to China and Vietnam. Hyacinth was beheaded in Vietnam. He was canonized in 1988.

1773 St. Vincent Liem Vietnamese Dominican martyr native
Vietnamese, he entered the Dominicans and was ordained a priest, working under St. Hyacinth Castaneda until he was arrested, tortured, and beheaded. He was canonized in 1988.

1814 Bl. Peter Ou  Chinese martyr native six hundred converts
Peter was originally an innkeeper who was converted to the Catholic faith and became a catechist. He is credited with giving Christian instruction to more than six hundred converts before he was strangled by enemies of the Church. He was beatified.

Saint Amandin Patron of Saint-Amandin (Cantal) and of a church in Clermont- Ferrand
but for reasons that have been lost (Encyclopedia).


 Monday  Saints of this Day November 07 Séptimo Idus Novémbris  

November 2 Feast of All Souls:  PURGATORY - - CONFESSIONS FROM THE SAINTS
November is the month of the Holy Souls in Purgatory since 1888;
   40 days for Life Day 40

Pope Francis  PRAYER INTENTIONS FOR  November 2016
Universal: Countries Receiving Refugees

That the countries which take in a great number of displaced persons and refugees may find support for their efforts which show solidarity.

Evangelization: Collaboration of Priests and Laity
That within parishes, priests and lay people may collaborate in service to the community without giving in to the temptation of discouragement.


God Bless Mother Angelica 1923-2016
ewtnmissionaries.com

On Death and Life
"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!    (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)
                      

                                                                           
       40 days for Life Day 40
40 Days for Life  11,000+ saved lives in 2015
We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
40 days for Life Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world

It is a great poverty that a child must die so that you may live as you wish -- Mother Teresa
 Saving babies, healing moms and dads, 'The Gospel of Life'

"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
It Makes No Sense Not To Believe In GOD 
Every Christian must be a living book
wherein one can read the teaching of the gospel

Jesus brings us many Blessings
 
The more we pray, the more we wish to pray. Like a fish which at first swims on the surface of the water, and afterwards plunges down, and is always going deeper; the soul plunges, dives, and loses itself in the sweetness of conversing with God. -- St. John Vianney

  Month by Month of Saintly Dedications


The Rosary html Mary Mother of GOD -- Her Rosary Here
Mary Mother of GOD Mary's Divine Motherhood: FEASTS OF OUR LADY
     of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

May 9 – Our Lady of the Wood (Italy, 1607) 
Months of Dedication
January is the month of the Holy Name of Jesus since 1902;
March is the month of Saint Joseph since 1855;
May, the month of Mary, is the oldest and most well-known Marian month, officially since 1724;
June is the month of the Sacred Heart since 1873;
July is the month of the Precious Blood since 1850;
August is the month of the Immaculate Heart of Mary;
September is the month of Our Lady of Sorrows since 1857;
October is the month of the Rosary since 1868;
November is the month of the Holy Souls in Purgatory since 1888;
December is the month of the Immaculate Conception.

In all, five months of the year are dedicated to Mary.
The idea of dedicating months came from Rome and promotion of the month of Mary owes much to the Jesuits.  arras.catholique.fr


Pray that the witness of 40 Days for Life bears abundant fruit, and that we begin again each day to storm the gates of hell until God welcomes us into the gates of heaven.

If you seek patience, you will find no better example than the cross. Great patience occurs in two ways:
either when one patiently suffers much, or when one suffers things which one is able to avoid and yet does not avoid.
Christ endured much on the cross, and did so patiently, because when he suffered he did not threaten;
he was led like a sheep to the slaughter and he did not open his mouth.-- St. Thomas Aquinas


We begin our day by seeing Christ in the consecrated bread, and throughout the day we continue to see Him in the torn bodies of our poor. We pray, that is, through our work, performing it with Jesus, for Jesus and upon Jesus.
The poor are our prayer. They carry God in them. Prayer means praying everything, praying the work.
We meet the Lord who hungers and thirsts, in the poor.....and the poor could be you or I or any person kind enough to show us his or her love and to come to our place.
Because we cannot see Christ, we cannot express our love to Him in person.
But our neighbor we can see, and we can do for him or her what we would love to do for Jesus if He were visible.
-- Mother Teresa
My God, I believe, I adore, I trust and I love Thee.  I beg pardon for those who do not believe, do not adore, do not love Thee.  O most Holy trinity, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, I adore Thee profoundly.
 I offer Thee the most precious Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ, present in all the Tabernacles of the world,  in reparation for the outrages, sacrileges and indifference by which He is offended,
and by the infite merits of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

I beg the conversion of poor sinners,  Amen Fatima Prayer, Angel of Peace
Mary's Divine Motherhood
Pope Francis and Pope Benedict XVI { 2013 } Catholic Church In China { article here}
1648 to1930 St. Augustine Zhao Rong and 120 Companions Christianity arrived in China by way of Syria -- 600s.
        Depending on China's relations with outside world,
Christianity for centuries was free to grow or forced to operate secretly.

How do I start the Five First Saturdays? 
Called in the Gospel “the Mother of Jesus,” Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as “the Mother of my Lord” (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity. Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos). 
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
“The Blessed Virgin was eternally predestined, in conjunction with the incarnation of the divine Word, to be the Mother of God. By decree of divine Providence, she served on earth as the loving mother of the divine Redeemer, an associate of unique nobility, and the Lord's humble handmaid. She conceived, brought forth, and nourished Christ.”
The voice of the Father is heard, the Son enters the water, and the Holy Spirit appears in the form of a dove.
   THE spirit and example of the world imperceptibly instil the error into the minds of many that there is a kind of middle way of going to Heaven; and so, because the world does not live up to the gospel, they bring the gospel down to the level of the world. It is not by this example that we are to measure the Christian rule, but words and life of Christ. All His followers are commanded to labour to become perfect even as our heavenly Father is perfect, and to bear His image in our hearts that we may be His children. We are obliged by the gospel to die to ourselves by fighting self-love in our hearts, by the mastery of our passions, by taking on the spirit of our Lord.
   These are the conditions under which Christ makes His promises and numbers us among His children, as is manifest from His words which the apostles have left us in their inspired writings. Here is no distinction made or foreseen between the apostles or clergy or religious and secular persons. The former, indeed, take upon themselves certain stricter obligations, as a means of accomplishing these ends more perfectly; but the law of holiness and of disengagement of the heart from the world is geeral and binds all the followers of Christ.

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THE EUCHARIST, A MYSTERY TO BE BELIEVED POST-SYNODAL APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION
SACRAMENTUM CARITATIS OF THE HOLY FATHER BENEDICT XVI
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Miracles by Century 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000    1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800   1900  Miracles_BLay Saints
Morning Prayer and Hymn    Meditation of the Day    Prayer for Priests    Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List  Here
We are called upon with the whole Church militant on earth to join in praising and thanking God for the grace and glory he has bestowed on his saints. At the same time we earnestly implore Him to exert His almighty power and mercy in raising us from our miseries and sins, healing the disorders of our souls and leading us by the path of repentance to the company of His saints, to which He has called us.
   They were once what we are now, travellers on earth they had the same weaknesses, which we have. We have difficulties to encounter so had the saints, and many of them far greater than we can meet with; obstacles from kings and whole nations, sometimes from the prisons, racks and swords of persecutors. Yet they surmounted these difficulties, which they made the very means of their virtue and victories. It was by the strength they received from above, not by their own, that they triumphed. But the blood of Christ was shed for us as it was for them and the grace of our Redeemer is not wanting to us; if we fail, the failure is in ourselves.
   THE saints and just, from the beginning of time and throughout the world, who have been made perfect, everlasting monuments of God’s infinite power and clemency, praise His goodness without ceasing; casting their crowns before His throne they give to Him all the glory of their triumphs: “His gifts alone in us He crowns.”
“The saints must be honored as friends of Christ and children and heirs of God, as John the theologian and evangelist says: ‘But as many as received him, he gave them the power to be made the sons of God....’ Let us carefully observe the manner of life of all the apostles, martyrs, ascetics and just men who announced the coming of the Lord. And let us emulate their faith, charity, hope, zeal, life, patience under suffering, and perseverance unto death, so that we may also share their crowns of glory” Exposition of the Orthodox Faith

Called in the Gospel the Mother of Jesus, Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as the Mother of my Lord (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son,  the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos).
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart ... From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque
On Friday during Holy Communion, He said these words to me, His unworthy slave, if I mistake not:
I promise you in the excessive mercy of my Heart that its all-powerful love will grant to all those who receive Holy Communion on nine first Fridays of consecutive months the grace of final repentance; they will not die under my displeasure or without receiving their sacraments, my divine Heart making itself their assured refuge at the last moment.
Margaret Mary was inspired by Christ to establish the Holy Hour and to pray lying prostrate with her face to the ground from eleven till midnight on the eve of the first Friday of each month, to share in the mortal sadness.
He endured when abandoned by His Apostles in His Agony, and to receive holy Communion on the first Friday of every month. In the first great revelation, He made known to her His ardent desire to be loved by men and His design of manifesting His Heart with all Its treasures of love and mercy, of sanctification and salvation.
He appointed the Friday after the octave of the feast of Corpus Christi as the feast of the Sacred Heart; He called her the Beloved Disciple of the Sacred Heart, and the heiress of all Its treasures. The love of the Sacred Heart was the fire which consumed her, and devotion to the Sacred Heart is the refrain of all her writings. In her last illness she refused all alleviation, repeating frequently: What have I in heaven and what do I desire on earth, but Thee alone, O my God, and died pronouncing the Holy Name of Jesus.
With regard to this promise it may be remarked: (1) that our Lord required Communion to be received on a particular day chosen by Him; (2) that the nine Fridays must be consecutive; (3) that they must be made in honor of His Sacred Heart, which means that those who make the nine Fridays must practice the devotion and must have a great love for our Lord; (4) that our Lord does not say that those who make the nine Fridays will be dispensed from any of their obligations or from exercising the vigilance necessary to lead a good life and overcome temptation; rather He implicitly promises abundant graces to those who make the nine Fridays to help them to carry out these obligations and persevere to the end; (5) that perseverance in receiving Holy Communion for nine consecutive First Firdays helps the faithful to acquire the habit of frequent Communion, which our Lord eagerly desires; and (6) that the practice of the nine Fridays is very pleasing to our Lord He promises such great reward, and all Catholics should endeavor to make nine Fridays.
How do I start the Five First Saturdays? by Fr. Tom O'Mahony.
On July 13,1917, Our Lady appeared for the third time to the three children of Fatima an showed them the vision of hell and made the now - famous thirteen prophecies. In this vision Our Lady said that 'GOD WISHES TO ESTABLISH IN THE WORLD DEVOTION to Her Immaculate Heart and that She would come TO ASK FOR THE COMMUNION OF REPARATION ON THE FIRST SATURDAYS...'  Eight years later, on December 10, 1925, Our Lady did indeed come back. She appeared (with the Child Jesus) to Lucia in the convent of the Dorothean Sisters in Pontevedra.
The Child Jesus spoke first:
'HAVE COMPASSION ON THE HEART OF YOUR MOST HOLY MOTHER WHICH IS COVERED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT, WHILE THERE IS NO ONE TO REMOVE THEM WITH AN ACT OF REPARATION.'

THE GREAT PROMISE
Our Lady then said: 'MY DAUGHTER LOOK AT MY HEART SURROUNDED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT BY THEIR BLASPHEMIES AND INGRATITUDE. YOU, AT LEAST, TRY TO CONSOLE ME, AND SAY THAT I PROMISE TO ASSIST AT THE HOUR OF DEATH WITH ALL THE GRACES NECESSARY FOR SALVATION, ALL THOSE WHO, ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS GO TO CONFESSION AND RECEIVE HOLY COMMUNION, RECITE FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY AND KEEP ME COMPANY FOR A QUARTER OF AN HOUR WHILE MEDITATING ON MYSTERIES OF THE ROSARY, WITH THE INTENTION OF MAKING REPARATION TO ME.'

The Five Reasons
Lucia once asked this question of Our Lord and received as an answer: 'MY DAUGHTER, THE MOTIVE IS SIMPLE, THERE ARE FIVE KINDS OF OFFENCES AND BLASPHEMIES UTTERED AGAINST THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY: (1) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION: (2) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER VIRGINITY: (3) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER DIVINE MATERNITY: (4) BLASPHEMIES OF THOSE WHO OPENLY SEEK TO FOSTER IN THE HEARTS OF CHILDREN INDIFFERENCE OR EVEN HATRED FOR THIS IMMACULATE MOTHER: (5) THE OFFENCES OF THOSE WHO DIRECTLY OUTRAGE HER IN HOLY IMAGES.'
From the above, it is easy to see that each of the Five Saturdays can correspond to a specific offence. By offering the graces received during each First Saturday as reparation for the offence being prayed for, the participant can hope to help remove the thorns from Our Lady's Heart.
What Do I Have To Do?
The devotion of First Saturdays, as requested by Our Lady of Fatima, carries with it the assurance of salvation. However, to derive profit from such a great promise of Our Lady, the devotion must be properly understood and duly performed.
The requirements as stipulated by Our Lady are as follows:
(1) CONFESSION, (2) COMMUNION, (3) FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY, (4) MEDITATION ON ONE OR MORE OF THE ROSARY MYSTERIES FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES, (5) TO DO ALL THESE THINGS IN THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION TO THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY, and (6) TO OBSERVE ALL THESE PRACTICES ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS.
(1) CONFESSION: A reparative confession means that the confession should not only be good (valid and licit), but also be offered in the spirit of reparation, in this case, to Mary's Immaculate Heart. This confession may be made on the First Saturday itself or some days before or after the First Saturday within the preceding octave would suffice.
(2) COMMUNION: The communion of reparation must be sacramental duly received with the intention of making reparation. This offering, like the confession, is an interior act and so no external action to express the intention is needed.
(3) THE ROSARY: The Rosary mentioned here was indicated by the Portuguese word 'terco' which is commonly employed to denote a Rosary of five decades, since it forms a fourth of the full Rosary of 20 decades. This too must recited in a spirit of reparation.
(4) MEDITATION FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES: Here the meditation on one mystery or more is to be made without simultaneous recitation of the Rosary decade. As indicated, the meditation may be either on one mystery alone for 15 minutes, or on all 20 mysteries, spending about one minute on each mystery, or again, on two or more mysteries during the period. This can also be made before each decade spending three minutes or more in considering the mystery of the particular decade. This meditation has likewise to be made in the spirit of reparation to the Immaculate Heart.
(5) THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION: All these acts, as said above, have to be done with the intention of offering reparation to the Immaculate Heart of Mary for the offences committed against Her. Everyone who offends Her commits, so to speak, a two-fold offence, for these sins also offend her Divine Son, Christ, and so endanger our salvation. They give bad example to others and weaken the strength of society to withstand immoral onslaughts. Such devotions therefore make us consider not only the enormity of the offence against God, but also the effect of sins on human society as well as the need for undoing these social effects even when the offender repents and is converted. Further, this reparation emphasises our responsibility towards sinners who, themselves, will not pray and make reparation for their sins.
(6) FIVE CONSECUTIVE FIRST SATURDAYS: The idea of the Five First Saturdays is obviously to make us persevere in the devotional acts for these Saturdays and overcome initial difficulties. Once this is done, Our Lady knows that the person would become devoted to Her immaculate Heart and persist in practising such devotion on all First Saturdays, working thereby for personal self-reform and for the salvation of others.

Unless Russia is converted, the movement against God and for sin will continue to spread, promoting wars and persecutions, and making the attainment for peace and justice impossible for this world. One means of obtaining Russia's conversion is to practise the Fatima Message. The stakes are so great that to encourage Catholics to practise the devotion of the First Saturdays, Our Lady has assured us that She will obtain salvation for all those who observe the first Saturdays for five consecutive months in accordance with Her conditions.
At the supreme moment the departing person will be either in the state of grace or not. In either case Our Lady will be by his side. If in the state of grace, She will console and help him to resist whatever temptations the devil might put before him in his last attempt to take the person with him to hell. If not in the state of grace, Our Lady will help the person to repent in a manner agreeable to God and so benefit by the fruits of redemption and be saved.