Mary Mother of GOD
Saints of this Day September  11  Tértio Idus Septémbris
Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List  Here
ABORTION IS A MORAL OUTRAGE
Et álibi aliórum plurimórum sanctórum Mártyrum et Confessórum, atque sanctárum Vírginum.
And elsewhere in divers places, many other holy martyrs, confessors, and holy virgins. Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!  (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)
Pope Benedict XVI to The Catholic Church In China {whole article here }

The saints a “cloud of witnesses over our head”, showing us life of Christian perfection is possible.
15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

"Christianity is not a moral code or a philosophy, but an encounter with a person" -- Benedict XVI

FRANCIS'S PRAYER INTENTIONS FOR   September
Value of Silence. That people today, often overwhelmed by noise, may rediscover the value of silence
and listen to the voice of God and their brothers and sisters.
Persecuted Christians. That Christians suffering persecution in many parts of the world
may by their witness be prophets of Christ's love.

Wednesday, September 11, 2013 Commemoration of 9/11
Colossians 3:1-11 Psalm 145:2-3, 10-13 Luke 6:20-26 
I saw the holy city, the new Jerusalem, coming down out of heaven from God,
prepared as a bride adorned for her husband. -- Apoc. xxi. 2


The Holy Martyrs Demetrius a prince and prefect of the city of Skepsis in the Hellespont, his wife Euanthea, and their son Demetrian; St Cornelius the Centurion (September 13), the first Gentile converted to Christ by the Apostle Paul, came into his city preaching the Gospel.
 258 St. Cyprian development of Christian thought and practice northern Africa: see Saint_of_the_Day
        September16.html Butler Lives - Thurston
3rd v. St. Felix & Regula Martyred brother &sister who fled to Switzerland during the persecution conducted by
        co-Emperor Maximian. They were captured and martyred near Zurich.
4th v. St. Paphnutius the Great bishop Nicaea; under Constantine the Great, he courageously strove for the Catholic
        faith against the Arians
253-268 SS. PROTUS AND HYACINTH, MARTYRS
4th v. St. Diodorus Martyr with Diomedes & Didymus
 491 St. Patiens Archbishop of Lyons, Gaul best known for his immense efforts at charitable work; constantly gave aid comfort to the poor, devoting resources of the diocese to feed those left starving by the Gothic and Germanic invasions and rebuilding / repairing burned and looted churches
 491 St. Theodora Egyptian penitent maiden of Alexandria
 520 St. Emilian Bishop of Vercelli, in Piedmont Italy;
He was a hermit for forty years before becoming bishop
 560 St. Almirus Hermit companion of Sts. Avitus & Carifelus
 584
St. Daniel Welsh bishop; founder; companion - Sts. Dygrig &David
 584 St. Deiniol Bishop of Bangor, Wales
 670 St. Bodo Bishop, founder brother -St. Salaberga
 
670 St. Adelphus Benedictine abbot; grandson of St. Romaricus; served as his successor as abbot of Remiremont
        Adelphus died at Luxeuil, France.

1003-1080 St. Peter of Chavanon Augustinian reformer; founder
1227 BD LOUIS OF THURINGIA
1353 Saints Sergius and Herman settled on the island of Valaam in 1329. The brethren gathered by them spread the light of Orthodoxy in this frontier land. The Karelian people began to regard Christianity with renewed suspicion, with its authority in the fourteenth century being undermined by the Swedes, who sought to spread Catholicism by means of the sword.
1622 Bl. Peter Ikiemon 7 yr old Japanese martyr
1622 Bl. Francis Takea A twelve-year-old martyr of Japan
1622 Bl. Caspar Kotenda Japanese martyr member of a Japanese noble house
1641 St. Ambrose Edward Barlow Martyr one of Forty Martyrs -England &Wales
1684 BD BONAVENTURE OF BARCELONA
1840 Bl. John-Gabriel Perboyre Martyr of China Vincentian from Puech;  Pope Leo XIII beatified him in 1889,
        making him the first martyr in China to be so honored. Pope John Paul II canonized him in 1996.

Wednesday September 11, 2010 Commemoration of 9/11

Take a moment to think of everything you're proud of about yourself and your life. Then ask yourself if you would have any of this without God's permission and aid? Give credit where credit is due; praise and thank Him, not yourself.-- St. Francis of Assisi

She is on Earth a Celestial Paradise September 11 - OUR LADY OF COROMOTO (Venezuela, 1652)
This holy and divine soul is in the Church what the dawn is to the firmament,
and she immediately precedes the sun. But she is more than the dawn.
God is and acts in her more than she does. She has no thoughts but by his grace, no movement but by his spirit, no action but for his love. The course of her life is a perpetual movement which, without interruption, without relaxation, tends to the One who will soon become her life...

The term is near, and the Lord is with her, he fills her with himself, and establishes her in a grace so rare that it fits her alone, for this Virgin hidden in a corner of Judea, unknown to the universe, betrothed to Joseph, forms a chorus of her own in the order of grace, so unique is she!  Years go by, graces increase. She enters, day after day, into an admirable elevation, by special infusion and perfect cooperation...
She is on earth a celestial paradise that God planted with his own hand, and that his angel keeps for the second Adam.  But this is hidden from her eyes, and her spirit, sunk in the depth of her humility,
doesn't see the lofty design that God has for her.   Cardinal Pierre de Bérulle (1575 - 1629)

Mary's Divine Motherhood
Called in the Gospel "the Mother of Jesus," Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as "the Mother of my Lord" (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity. Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly "Mother of God" (Theotokos).
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.

Our Lady and the Church September 11 - Our Lady of Coromoto (Venezuela, 1652)
The Virgin Mary is both holy and blessed, and yet the Church is greater than she.
Mary is part of the Church, a member of the Church, a holy and eminent - the most eminent - member, but still only a member of the entire body. The body undoubtedly is greater than she, one of its members.  This body has the Lord for its head, and head and body together make up the whole Christ. In other words, our head is divine - our head is God.
Saint Augustine Sermo 25, 7-8, PL 46, 937-38.

4th v. St. Diodorus Martyr with Diomedes & Didymus They were executed in Laodicia, in Syria.
Laodicéæ, in Syria, pássio sanctórum Diodóri, Diomédis et Dídymi.
    At Laodicea in Syria, the martyrdom of Saints Diodorus, Diomedes,  and Didymus.
Saint Diodorus was born in Laodicea in the fourth century, and suffered martyrdom in that city. He and his companions Didymus and Diomedes were flogged to death.
The Holy Martyrs Demetrius, his wife Euanthea, and their son Demetrian. St Demetrius was a prince and prefect of the city of Skepsis in the Hellespont. St Cornelius the Centurion (September 13), the first Gentile converted to Christ by the Apostle Paul, came into his city preaching the Gospel.

St Cornelius sowed the seeds of Christianity among many of the inhabitants of Skepsis, and so the pagans arrested him and brought him to trial before the prefect Demetrius. In vain he demanded that the saint renounce Christ, and finally handed him over for torture.

St Cornelius bravely endured the torture, while in turn urging the prefect to forsake his pagan errors and turn to the true faith in Christ. Led into a temple of idols, St Cornelius destroyed the pagan temple and the idols standing in it by his prayer.

Persuaded of the truth of Christianity by the saint's preaching and by his miracles, the prefect Demetrius himself came to believe in Christ and was baptized with all his family. Because the saints now believed in Christ, the pagans threw the newly-converted family into prison where they were starved to death.

258 St. Cyprian; development of Christian thought and practice northern Africa
Cyprian is important in the development of Christian thought and practice in the third century, especially in northern Africa.
Highly educated, a famous orator, he was converted to Christianity as an adult. He distributed his goods to the poor, and amazed his fellow citizens by making a vow of chastity before his Baptism. Within two years he had been ordained a priest and was chosen, against his will, as Bishop of Carthage (near modern Tunis).
   Cyprian complained that the peace the Church had enjoyed had weakened the spirit of many Christians and had opened the door to converts who did not have the true spirit of faith. When the Decian persecution began, many Christians easily abandoned the Church. It was their reinstatement that caused the great controversies of the third century, and helped the Church progress in its understanding of the Sacrament of Penance. Novatus, a priest who had opposed Cyprian's election, set himself up in Cyprian's absence (he had fled to a hiding place from which to direct the Church—bringing criticism on himself) and received back all apostates without imposing any canonical penance. Ultimately he was condemned. Cyprian held a middle course, holding that those who had actually sacrificed to idols could receive Communion only at death, whereas those who had only bought certificates saying they had sacrificed could be admitted after a more or less lengthy period of penance. Even this was relaxed during a new persecution.
   During a plague in Carthage, he urged Christians to help everyone, including their enemies and persecutors.
   A friend of Pope Cornelius, Cyprian opposed the following pope, Stephen. He and the other African bishops would not recognize the validity of Baptism conferred by heretics and schismatics. This was not the universal view of the Church, but Cyprian was not intimidated even by Stephen's threat of excommunication.  He was exiled by the emperor and then recalled for trial. He refused to leave the city, insisting that his people should have the witness of his martyrdom.
    Cyprian was a mixture of kindness and courage, vigor and steadiness. He was cheerful and serious, so that people did not know whether to love or respect him more. He waxed warm during the baptismal controversy; his feelings must have concerned him, for it was at this time that he wrote his treatise on patience. St. Augustine remarks that Cyprian atoned for his anger by his glorious martyrdom.
Comment: The controversies about Baptism and Penance in the third century remind us that the early Church had no ready-made solutions from the Holy Spirit. The leaders and members of the Church of that day had to move painfully through the best series of judgments they could make in an attempt to follow the entire teaching of Christ and not be diverted by exaggerations to right or left.
Quote: “You cannot have God for your Father if you do not have the Church for your mother.... God is one and Christ is one, and his Church is one; one is the faith, and one is the people cemented together by harmony into the strong unity of a body.... If we are the heirs of Christ, let us abide in the peace of Christ; if we are the sons of God, let us be lovers of peace” (St. Cyprian, The Unity of the Catholic Church). 
4th v. St. Paphnutius the Great bishop Nicaea; under Constantine the Great, he courageously strove for the Catholic faith against the Arians
In Ægypto sancti Paphnútii Epíscopi, qui unus fuit ex iis Confessóribus, qui, sub Galério Maximiáno Imperatóre, dextro óculo effósso et sinístro póplite excíso, ad metálla damnáti fuérunt; deínde, sub Constantíno Magno, advérsus Ariános, pro fide cathólica, strénue decertávit; et demum, multis corónis auctus, in pace quiévit.
    In Egypt, the holy bishop Paphnutius, one of those confessors who, under Emperor Galerius Maximinus, having the right eye plucked out and the joint of the left knee cut, were condemned to work in the metal mines. Afterwards, under Constantine the Great, he courageously strove for the Catholic faith against the Arians, and at length, adorned with many crowns, rested in peace.

350? ST PAPHNUTIUS, Bishop
THE holy confessor Paphnutius was an Egyptian who, after having spent several years in the desert under the direction of the great St Antony, was made bishop in the Upper Thebaid. He was one of those confessors who under the Emperor Maximinus lost the right eye, were hamstrung in one leg, and were afterwards sent to work in the mines. Peace being restored to the Church, Paphnutius returned to his flock, bearing all the rest of his life the glorious marks of his sufferings for the name of his crucified Master. He was one of the most zealous in defending the Catholic faith against the Arian heresy and for his holiness, and as one who had confessed the faith before persecutors and under torments, was an outstanding figure of the first general council of the Church, held at Nicaea in the year 325.

Paphnutius, a man who had observed the strictest continence all his life, is said to have distinguished himself at the council by his opposition to clerical celibacy.

Many of the bishops were for making a general law forbidding all bishops, priests, deacons and subdeacons to live with wives whom they had married before their ordination. Whereupon Paphnutius rose up in the assembly and opposed the motion, saying that it was enough to conform to the ancient tradition of the Church, which forbade the clergy marrying after their ordination. For the married the use of wedlock is chastity, he reminded the fathers, and implored them not to lay the yoke of separation on clerics and their wives. St Paphnutius carried the council with him, and to this day it is the law of the Eastern churches, whether Catholic or dissident, that married men may receive all holy orders below the episcopate, and continue to live freely with their wives.

St Paphnutius remained always in a close union with St Athanasius and the other orthodox prelates. He and other Egyptian bishops accompanied their holy patriarch to the Council of Tyre in 335, where they found the greater part of the members who composed that assembly to be professed Arians. Paphnutius, seeing Maximus, Bishop of Jerusalem, among them and full of concern to find a prelate who had suffered in the late persecution in such bad company, took him by the hand, led him out, and told him that he could not bear that anyone who bore the same marks as himself in defence of the faith should be led away and imposed upon by persons who were resolved to condemn the most strenuous asserter of its fundamental article. Maximus was overcome by the saint’s appeal and let himself be led to a seat among the supporters of St Athanasius, whom he never afterwards deserted.

St Paphnutius is sometimes called “the Great” to distinguish him from other saints of the same name; the year of his death is not known.

There is no early life of St Paphnutius, but in the Acta Sanctorum, September, vol. iii, a number of passages, notably from the historians Socrates and Theodoret, have been brought together. See also DCB., vol. iv, p. 185. The authenticity of the pronouncement attributed to Paphnutius on the celibacy question has been often discussed. Consult on this DTC., vol. ii, c. 2078.
The holy confessor Paphnutius was an Egyptian who, after having spent several years in the desert under the direction of the great St. Antony, was made bishop in the Upper Thebaid. He was one of those confessors who under the Emperor Maximinus 305-313 lost the right eye, were hamstrung in one leg, and were afterwards sent to work in the mines.
Peace being restored to the Church, Paphnutius returned to his flock, bearing all the rest of his life the glorious marks of his sufferings for the name of his Crucified Master. He was one of the most zealous in defending the Catholic faith against the Arian heresy and for his holiness. As one who had confessed the Faith before persecutors and under torments, he was an outstanding figure of the first General Council of the Church, held at Nicaea in the year 325.
Paphnutius, a man who had observed the strictest continence all his life, is said to have distinguished himself at the Council by his opposition to clerical celibacy. Paphnutius said that it was enough to conform to the ancient tradition of the Church, which forbade the clergy marrying after their ordination. To this day it is the law of the Eastern Churches, whether Catholic or dissident, that married men may receive all Holy Orders below the episcopate, and continue to live freely with their wives. St. Paphnutius is sometimes called "the Great" to distinguish him from other saints of the same name; the year of his death is not known.
   The most celebrated personage of this name was bishop of a city in the Upper Thebaid in the early fourth century, and one of the most interesting members of the Council of Nicæa (325). He suffered mutilation of the left knee and the loss of his right eye for the Faith under the Emperor Maximinus (308-13), and was subsequently condemned to the mines. At Nicæa he was greatly honoured by Constantine the Great, who, according to Socrates (H. E., I, 11), used often to send for the good old confessor and kiss the place whence the eye had been torn out.
   He took a prominent, perhaps a decisive, part in the debate at the First Œcumenical Council on the subject of the celibacy of the clergy. It seems that most of the bishops present were disposed to follow the precedent of the Council of Elvira (can. xxxiii) prohibiting conjugal relations to those bishops, priests, deacons, and, according to Sozomen, sub-deacons, who were married before ordination. Paphnutius earnestly entreated his fellow-bishops not to impose this obligation on the orders of the clergy concerned. He proposed, in accordance "with the ancient tradition of the Church", that only those who were celibates at the time of ordination should continue to observe continence, but, on the other hand, that "none should be separated from her, to whom, while yet unordained, he had been united".
   The great veneration in which he was held, and the well known fact that he had himself observed the strictest chastity all his life, gave weight to his proposal, which was unanimously adopted. The council left it to the discretion of the married clergy to continue or discontinue their marital relations. Paphnutius was present at the Synod of Tyre (335). 

3rd v. St. Felix & Regula Martyred brother &sister who fled to Switzerland during the persecution conducted by co-Emperor Maximian. They were captured and martyred near Zurich.
253-269 SS. PROTUS AND HYACINTH, MARTYRS
Romæ, via Salária véteri, in cœmetério Basíllæ, natális sanctórum Mártyrum Proti et Hyacínthi fratrum, eunuchórum beátæ Eugéniæ.  Hi, sub Galliéno Imperatóre, deprehénsi quod essent Christiáni, sacrificáre cogúntur; sed non consentiéntes, primo duríssime verberáti sunt, ac tandem páriter decolláti.
    At Rome, on the old Salarian Way in the cemetery of Basilla, the birthday of the holy martyrs Protus and Hyacinth, brothers, and eunuchs in the service of blessed Eugenia.  They were arrested in the time of Emperor Gallienus on the charge of being Christians, and urged to offer sacrifice to the gods.  Because they refused, they were most severely scourged and finally beheaded.
THESE martyrs are mentioned in the Depositio martyrum of the middle of the fourth century. They were buried in the cemetery of Basilla or St Hermes on the Old Salarian Way, and here in the year 1845 Father Joseph archi, s.j., found the burial-place of St Hyacinth undisturbed. It was a niche closed with a slab bearing the inscription dp III Idus SEPTEBR/YACINTHUS/MARTYR:

Hyacinth the Martyr, buried September 11. Within it were the remains of the martyr, charred bones and traces of costly material. He had evidently met his death by fire. These precious relics were translated to the church of the Urban College in 1849. Near by was found part of a later inscription, bearing the words SEPULCRUM PR0TI M: The tomb of Protus, M[artyr], but no other trace of him. The relics of St Protus are supposed to have been removed into the city by Pope St Leo IV in the middle of the ninth century, and parts thereof have been translated several times since. In an epitaph by Pope St Damasus, these martyrs are referred to as brothers.

The simple certitude of the passion, burial and finding of St Hyacinth is in marked contrast with the “acts”, which are contained in those of St Eugenia and are entirely fictitious. The story is that Eugenia, the Christian daughter of the prefect of Egypt, fled from her father’s house with Protus and Hyacinth, her two slaves. Eugenia after various adventures converts her family and many others. Among them, the Roman lady Basilla is brought to the faith by the efforts of Protus and Hyacinth, and she, Protus and Hyacinth are all beheaded together.

See Delehaye’s CMH., pp. 501—502, where there is a succinct but complete statement of the facts, with references his Origines du culte des martyrs (1933), pp. 72, 272; and his Étude sur 1e légendier romain (1936), pp. 574—175, 183—184. See also J. Marchi, Monu­menti  primitivi, vol. i, pp. 238 seq. and 264 seq.; and cf. bibliography of St Eugenia on December 25. On the parish of “St Pratt” (Blisland In Cornwall), see Analecta Bollandiana, vol. lxix (1951), p. 443.
491 St. Theodora Egyptian penitent maiden of Alexandria; miracles
Alexandríæ sanctæ Theodóræ, quæ, cum incáute deliquísset, inde, facti pænitens, mirábili abstinéntia et patiéntia in hábitu sancto perseverávit incógnita usque ad mortem.
    At Alexandria, St. Theodora, who having committed a fault through imprudence and repenting of it, remained unknown in a religious habit, and persevered until her death in practices of extraordinary abstinence and patience.

ST THEODORA OF ALEXANDRIA
The Roman Martyrology speaks today of the death at Alexandria of St Theodora, “who, having transgressed through carelessness, was repentant therefor and persevered in the religious habit, unknown and with marvellous abstinence and patience, until her death”.

These restrained words are very different in tone from the legends of St Theodora. They relate that she was the wife of Gregory, prefect of Egypt, and that, having fallen into grave sin, she fled away from her home to expiate it in a monastery of the Thebaid. Disguised as a man she lived for many years among the monks a life of extraordinary austerity. Once when she went into Alexandria in charge of some camels she was recognized by her husband, but she insisted on returning to the desert, where she lived for the rest of her life.

There was a St Theodora who was known to the fathers of the desert, whose wise sayings they repeated, but the above story, decked out with other fictitious particulars, is nothing but a romance, belonging to that class which Father Delehaye traces to the tale of St Pelagia of Antioch (October 8). For example, like St Reparata, St Marina, and others who lived as men among monks, St Theodora was accused of being guilty of seduction and was vindicated only after her death.

On September 17 the Roman Martyrology makes mention of another ST THEODORA, a matron of Rome who zealously ministered to the holy martyrs during the persecution under Diocletian.

The Greek text of the fictitious story of Theodora has been printed by K. Wessely at Vienna, Die Vita S. Theodorae (1889). See also the Acta Sanctorum, September, vol. iii and Delehaye, Les légendes hagiographiques (1927), p. 189 and passim.
Who fell into a life of sin, repented, and spent her remaining days in virtual anonymity as a hermit in the Thebaid, in the southern region of Egypt, atoning through abstinence and mortifications.  The fact that she was a woman was not discovered until she died.

Saint Theodora of Alexandria and her husband lived in Alexandria. Love and harmony ruled in their family, and this was hateful to the Enemy of salvation. Goaded on by the devil, a certain rich man was captivated by the youthful beauty of Theodora and began with all his abilities to lead her into adultery, but for a long time he was unsuccessful. Then he bribed a woman of loose morals, who led the unassuming Theodora astray by saying that a secret sin, which the sun does not see, is also unknown to God.
Theodora betrayed her husband, but soon came to her senses and realizing the seriousness of her fall, she became furious with herself, slapping herself on the face and tearing at her hair. Her conscience gave her no peace, and Theodora went to a renowned abbess and told her about her transgression. The abbess, seeing the repentance of the young woman, spoke to her of God's forgiveness and reminded her of the the sinful woman in the Gospel, who washed the feet of Christ with her tears and received from Him forgiveness of her sins. In hope of the mercy of God, Theodora said: "I believe my God, and from now on, I shall not commit such a sin, and I will strive to atone for my deed."  At that moment St Theodora resolved to go off to a monastery to purify herself by labor and by prayer. She left her home secretly, and dressing herself in men's clothes, she went to a men's monastery, since she feared that her husband would find her in a women's monastery.

The igumen of the monastery, in order to test the resolve of the newcomer, would not even bless her to enter the courtyard. St Theodora spent the night at the gates. In the morning, she fell down at the knees of the igumen, and said her name was Theodore from Alexandria, and entreated him to let her remain at the monastery for repentance and monastic labors. Seeing the sincere intent of the newcomer, the igumen consented.

Even the experienced monks were amazed at Theodora's all-night prayers on bended knee, her humility, endurance and self-denial. The saint labored at the monastery for eight years. Her body, once defiled by adultery, now became a vessel of the grace of God and a receptacle of the Holy Spirit.
Once, the saint was sent to Alexandria to buy provisions. After blessing her for the journey, the igumen indicated that in case of a delay, she should stay over at the Enata monastery, which was on the way. Also staying at the guest house of the Enata monastery was the daughter of its igumen. She had come to visit with her father. Attracted by the comeliness of the young monk, she tried to seduce the monk Theodore into the sin of fornication, not knowing that it was a woman standing before her. Meeting with refusal, she committed sin with another guest and became pregnant.
Meanwhile, the saint bought the food and returned to her own monastery.
After a certain while the father of the shameless girl, realizing that a transgression had occurred, began to question his daughter about the father of the child. The girl indicated that it was the monk Theodore. The father at once reported it to the Superior of the monastery where St Theodora labored in asceticism. The igumen summoned the saint and repeated the accusation. The saint firmly replied: "As God is my witness, I did not do this."
The igumen, knowing of Theodore's purity and holiness of life, did not believe the accusation.
When the girl gave birth, the Enata monks brought the infant to the monastery where the ascetic lived, and began to reproach its monks for an unchaste life. But this time even the igumen believed the slanderous accusation and became angry at the innocent Theodore.
   They entrusted the infant into the care of the saint and threw her out of the monastery in disgrace. The saint humbly submitted to this new trial, seeing in it the expiation of her former sin. She settled with the child not far from the monastery in a hut. Shepherds, out of pity, gave her milk for the infant, and the saint herself ate only wild vegetables.  Bearing her misfortune, the holy ascetic spent seven years in banishment. Finally, at the request of the monks, the igumen allowed her to return to the monastery with the child, and in seclusion she spent two years instructing the child.

The igumen of the monastery received a revelation from God that the sin of the monk Theodore was forgiven. The grace of God dwelt upon the monk Theodore, and soon all the monks began to witness to the signs worked through the prayers of the saint.

Once, during a drought, all the wells dried up. The igumen said to the brethren that only Theodore would be able to reverse the misfortune. Having summoned the saint, the igumen bade her to bring forth water, and the water in the well did not dry up afterwards. The humble Theodore said that the miracle was worked through the prayer and faith of the igumen.

Before her death, St Theodora shut herself in her cell with the child and instructed him to love God above all things. She told him to obey the igumen and the brethren, to preserve tranquility, to be meek and without malice, to avoid obscenity and silliness, to love non-covetousness, and not to neglect their communal prayer. After this, she prayed and, for the last time, she asked the Lord to forgive her sins. The child also prayed together with her. Soon the words of prayer faded from the lips of the ascetic, and she peacefully departed to a better world.

The Lord revealed to the igumen the spiritual accomplishments of the saint, and also her secret. The igumen, in order to remove any dishonor from the deceased, in the presence of the igumen and brethren of the Enata monastery, told of his vision and uncovered the bosom of the saint as proof.

The Enata igumen and brethren shrank back in terror at their great transgression. Falling down before the body of the saint, with tears they asked forgiveness of St Theodora. News of St Theodora reached her former husband. He received monastic tonsure at this same monastery where his wife had been. And the child, raised by the nun, also followed in the footsteps of his foster-mother. Afterwards, he became igumen of this very monastery.

491 St. Patiens Archbishop of Lyons, Gaul best known for his immense efforts at charitable work. He constantly gave aid and comfort to the poor, devoting the resources of the diocese to feed those left starving by the Gothic and Germanic invasions and to rebuilding and repairing burned and looted churches
Lugdúni, in Gállia, deposítio sancti Patiéntis Epíscopi.    At Lyons in France, the death of St. Patiens, bishop.
Little is known about his early life, but he received appointment in 450 to the see of Lyons. His period as archbishop is best known for his immense efforts at charitable work. He constantly gave aid and comfort to the poor, devoting the resources of the diocese to feed those left starving by the Gothic and Germanic invasions and to rebuilding and repairing burned and looted churches. Patiens was also a dedicated enemy of Arianism. He also ordered Constantius, a priest of the diocese, to write a life of St. Germanus of Auxerre which subsequently became immensely popular.

480 ST PATIENS, BISHOP OF LYONS
God was pleased to raise up this holy prelate for the comfort and support of his servants in Gaul under the calamities with which that country was afflicted during a great part of the fifth century. He was about the year 450 promoted to the see of Lyons. An incursion of the Goths into Burgundy brought on a serious famine, during which St Patiens fed thousands at his own expense; Providence wonderfully multiplied his revenues to furnish him with abundant supplies to build churches, to repair old ones, and to feed the poor wherever they might be in Gaul, as St Sidonius Apollinaris assures us. That illustrious prelate and friend of St Patiens calls him a “holy, active, ascetic and merciful man”, and declares that he knew not which to admire more in him, his zeal for God or his charity for the poor.
 
By his pastoral solicitude and sermons many heretics were converted; a great field was open to St Patiens for the exercise of his zeal in this respect, for the Burgundians, who were at that time masters of Lyons, were infected with the heresy of the Arians, and some of his fellow bishops were not free from it. When the diocese of Chalon­-sur-Saone was thrown into confusion and disagreement by the death of its bishop, St. Patiens was invited by St Euphronius of Autun to help him in its pacification and the removal of the scandal. At the order of St Patiens, Constantius, a priest among his clergy, wrote the Life of St Germanus of Auxerre, which he dedicated to his bishop. He seems to have died about the year 480.

There is no ancient life of St Patiens of Lyons, but the Bollandists have collected from Sidonius Apollinaris, Gregory of Tours and others, a sufficient account of his activities. See also S. L. Tatu, St Patient, évêque de Lyon (1878), and Duchesne, Fastes Épiscopaux, vol. ii, p. 163.
520 St. Emilian Bishop of Vercelli, in Piedmont Italy He was a hermit for forty years before becoming bishop
Vercéllis sancti Æmiliáni Epíscopi.    At Vercelli, St. Aemilian, bishop.
560 St. Almirus Hermit companion of Sts. Avitus & Carifelus
He was born in Auvergne, France and educated at Menat. With Sts. Avitus and Carifelus, Almirus went to Maine in France. He then became a hermit and remained so until his death at Greez-sur Roc.

554 St. Vincent of Leon Spanish abbot and martyr
Legióne, in Hispánia, sancti Vincéntii, Abbátis et Mártyris.   
At Leon in Spain, St. Vincent, abbot and martyr.
The abbot of St. Claudius monastery in Leon, Spain, he was martyred by Arian Visigoths. There is some confusion as to the date of his death. Some lists state that he died about 630.
584 St. Daniel Welsh bishop founder companion - Sts. Dygrig &David
Daniel belonged to the Strathclyde family of Wales. He founded a monastery at Bangor Fawr, Caernarvonshire, in 514. He also became the first bishop of that see. Daniel went to St. David to persuade him to attend the Synod of Brefi. In Wales he is sometimes called Desiniol.
 

584 ST DEINIOL, Bishop
THIS famous bishop, “Daniel of the Bangors”, came of a Strathclyde family. He went into Arfon and established the monastery of Bangor Fawr on the Menai Straits, which became the nucleus of the medieval diocese of Bangor. Deiniol was also the founder of the monastery of Bangor Iscoed on the Dee, and is alleged to have been consecrated bishop by St Dyfrig or St Teilo or St David himself, who is said to have sent Deiniol into Gaul to fetch a bishop to help combat a recrudescence of Pelagianism. The same crisis is put forward to account for a synod at Llanddewi Frefi about the year 545: Rhygyfarch in his vita of St David says that David refused to attend this assembly, whereupon Deiniol and Dyfrig were sent to fetch him and succeeded in persuading him to come; and David’s eloquence swept all before him.

A number of miracles are related of St Deiniol, not always free from that element of haughty pride and revenge which is a characteristic of so many Celtic hagiological stories. When he died he was buried at Ynys Ynlli, now commonly called Bardsey. St Deiniol is named on various dates, September 11 being the day on which his feast is now kept in the diocese of Menevia.

Very little can be stated with any certainty about this saint, but Baring-Gould and Fisher, LBS., vol. ii, profess to give an account of him; and something may be gleaned from A. W. Wade-Evans, Life of St David (1923) and Welsh Christian Origins (1934). His name is familiar to generations of grateful students from St Deiniol’s Library at Hawarden in Flintshire, founded by W. E. Gladstone in 1896.
584 St. Deiniol Bishop of Bangor, Wales
 He is also called Daniel. The cathedral and other regional parishes bear his name.
 
670 St. Adelphus Benedictine abbot; grandson of St. Romaricus; served as his successor as abbot of Remiremont Adelphus died at Luxeuil, France.
670 St. Bodo Bishop, founder brother -St. Salaberga
He was born in Toul, France, where he married. His wife became a nun with Salaberga, and he entered the Benedictines at Laon. He became the bishop of Toul, and founded abbeys at Etival, Bon-Moutier, and Affonville.

1003-1080 St. Peter of Chavanon Augustinian reformer founder
Born at Langeac, in Haute Loire, France, he received ordination and served for a time as a priest in his native region. Later, he founded a monastery for Augustinian canons at Pebrac, Auvergne, using land which had been given to him. On the basis of the success of the house, he was asked to reform a number of cathedral chapters.
 

1080 ST PETER OF CHAVANON
THE Canons Regular of the Lateran today keep the memory of this saint, who adorned their order in the eleventh century. He was born in the year 1003 at Langeac in Haute-Loire, and was given a good education in the course of which he discovered his vocation to the priesthood. After his ordination he was appointed priest of his birthplace, where he faithfully fulfilled his duties and secretly led a very austere life. He for long desired to leave pastoral work and submit himself to a rule in community, and eventually found an occasion to do so when he was persecuted by the attentions of a woman who was attracted towards him.

He was given some land at Pébrac in Auvergne. Here St Peter founded and built a monastery for canons regular under the Rule of St Augustine, and himself governed it as the first provost. The success of his undertaking caused several bishops to call him in to help them to bring rule and order into the collegiate chapters of their cathedrals. St Peter of Chavanon died on September 9, 1080, and was buried at Pébrac, of which house the holy M. Olier was made abbot in commendam at the age of eighteen, in 1626.

1227 BD LOUIS OF THURINGIA
IF we were bound to take all the writings of hagiographers at the foot of the letter we should he faced with the conclusion that most women saints who were married were hindered (or helped) on the path of sanctity by the ill-will or general short­comings of their husbands; the unworthy husband of the holy wife is almost common form, and as such it is to be distrusted. No one has tried to find such unhappy tension between Elizabeth of Hungary and Louis (Ludwig) of Thuringia, for the good reason that it so obviously did not exist (though even here there is a book by a well-known clerical writer in which the author has been betrayed by careless adhesion to common form into applying it to these two); veneration for Louis was as spontaneous among his people as it was for his wife it is true that the cultus has not been officially confirmed (it has not been put forward), but it is nevertheless worthy of respect.

Louis was the eldest son of the Landgrave Herman I and was born in 1200. When he was eleven years old a betrothal was arranged for him with Elizabeth, daughter of King Andrew II of Hungary, who was then four. Later the child was taken to the Thuringian court, the two grew up together, and in 1221, when Louis succeeded his father, the marriage was ratified. In its origin this alliance was purely one of political expedience, but it proved to be none the worse for that; they had a son and two daughters, of whom the younger is known as Bd Gertrude of Altenberg.

Louis in every way encouraged the charity and devotion of his wife. Once he found a leper, who had come to the castle for relief, laid in their bed; for a moment he was tempted to anger but then he saw, as it were, not the leper hut the crucified Son of God lying there, and he made no complaint but instead paid for the building of a lazar-house on the slope of the Wartburg. St Elizabeth told him they could serve God better if instead of a castle and a county they had land enough for one plough and a couple of hundred sheep. Her husband laughed. “We should hardly be poor”, he said, “with so much land and so many sheep. And there would be plenty of folk to say we were far too well off.”

The landgrave was a good ruler as well as a good man. In 1225 some Thurin­gian merchants were robbed and beaten over the Polish border. Louis demanded reparation; none was forthcoming. So he rode into Poland and by force extorted satisfaction from the citizens of Lubitz. The same thing happened at Würzburg; he marched into the prince-bishopric to recover the stock of which a trader had been robbed.

In 1226 the Emperor Frederick II sent for the military help of Louis, and he assisted with his counsel at the diet of Cremona. He was away for a winter, a hard winter, and a spring; when he returned, Elizabeth “a thousand times and more”, says Berthold, “kissed him with her heart and with her mouth”, and when he inquired how his people had fared in the terrible frost,  “I gave to God what was His, and God has kept for us what was ours”, she replied. “Let her do good and give to God whatever she will, so long as she leaves me Wartburg and Neuenburg”, was Louis’s answer to a complaining treasurer.

In the following year he volunteered to follow the emperor on the crusade (the story of Elizabeth finding the cross in his purse is well known); to rouse men’s hearts he had a passion-play presented in the streets of Eisenach, and visited the monasteries of his dominion, asking for prayers. The Central-German forces concentrated at Schmalkalden, and Louis was in command; here on the birthday of St John he parted from Elizabeth, and set out towards the Holy Sepulchre. In August he met the emperor at Troja, and in September the army embarked ; three days later the fleet put into Otranto, and Louis took to his bed. He had a malarial fever and was dying; he received the last sacraments, and it seemed to him that the cabin wherein he lay was full of doves. “I must fly away with these white doves”, he said, and died. When the news was brought to his wife, “The world is dead to me”, she cried, “and all that was pleasant in it”. The young landgrave was buried in the Benedictine abbey of Reinhardsbrunn, and there he is popularly called “St Ludwig” to this day.

There is a German fourteenth-century translation of a still earlier Latin life of the Landgrave Louis IV. This Latin biography, written by Bertoldus, who was Louis’s chaplain and a monk of Reinhardsbrunn, seems not to have been separately preserved to us, though some contend that it is practically incorporated in the Annales Reinhardsbrunnenses which were edited by Wegele in 1854. There is an excellent article on Louis by C. Wenck in the Allgemeine deutsche Biographie, vol. xix, pp. 589—597, and a biography in German by G. Simon (1854). See also Michael, Geschicte des deutschen Volkes seit dem 13 Jahrh., vol. i, p. 22,, and ii, pp. 207 seq. Further, the many lives of St Elizabeth of Hungary all contain some notice of her husband.
1353 Saints Sergius and Herman settled on the island of Valaam in 1329. The brethren gathered by them spread the light of Orthodoxy in this frontier land. The Karelian people began to regard Christianity with renewed suspicion, with its authority in the fourteenth century being undermined by the Swedes, who sought to spread Catholicism by means of the sword.
Sts Sergius and Herman died about the year 1353.
They are also commemorated on June 28 (Their holy repose).

Sergius_Valaam_relics_translation.jpg
1622 Bl. Peter Ikiemon 7 yr old Japanese martyr
Peter was when, with his father, Blessed Bartholomew, he was beheaded at Nagasaki. His feast day comes one day after two other young martyrs of Japan, Peter Nangashi and Peter Sanga.
 
1622 Bl. Francis Takea A twelve-year-old martyr of Japan
the son of Blessed Thomas Takea and a companion of Blessed Caspar Contenda. Francis was beheaded at Nagasaki, Japan. He was beatified in 1867
.
1622 Bl. Caspar Kotenda Japanese martyr member of a Japanese noble house
He was a member of a Japanese noble house who converted to the faith. He was arrested and martyred at Nagasaki.

1641 St. Ambrose Edward Barlow Martyr one of Forty Martyrs -England &Wales
A convert, Ambrose studied for the priesthood at Douai, France, and Valladolid, Spain. In 1615 he was a professed Benedictine, affiliated by request to the Spanish Abbey of Celanova. For twenty-four years, Ambrose worked in Lancashire, England, despite the dangers. He was arrested four times but was released. On his fifth arrest, he was executed at Lancaster.
 
1684 BD BONAVENTURE OF BARCELONA
IN his youth this beatus was a shepherd near Barcelona. He was married when he was seventeen, but within two years his wife was dead and he became a Fran­ciscan lay-brother. He was a man of the deepest spirituality, and his religious ecstasies became so well known that his superiors sent him far off, to Rome, where he became door-keeper at the friary of St Isidore. But neither could his light be hidden there; and it was thanks to the interest taken in him by two cardinals that he was able to establish at Ponticelli the first of several houses of retreat, hermi­tages, for members of his order, although his superiors were not too favour­able to the enterprise. The best-known of these establishments was at Rome itself, on the Palatine. Bd Bonaventure died in 1684, and he was beatified in 1906.
See the Acta Ord. Fratrum Minorum, vol. xxix (5950); and Fr Leonard da Popi, II b. Bonaventura...(1906; Eng. trans., 1920).
1840 Bl. John-Gabriel Perboyre Martyr of China Vincentian from Puech; Pope Leo XIII beatified him in 1889, making him the  first martyr in China to be so honored. Pope John Paul II canonized him in 1996
France, who was ordained in 1826. In 1835 he volunteered for the missions of China and went to Honan, where he rescued abandoned children. When the persecution started, John was arrested and tortured for a year. On September 11, he was strangled to death. Pope Leo XIII beatified him in 1889, making him the
first martyr in China to be so honored. Pope John Paul II canonized him in 1996. 

1840 BD JOHN GABRIEL PERBOYRE, MARTYR
THOUGH John Gabriel Perboyre was the first Christian in China to be beatified (in 1889) he was very far from being the first martyr in that country. After the re-establishment of the missions there in the beginning of the seventeenth century there were only relatively short periods during which Christians were free from danger. At the end of the eighteenth century fierce persecution was carried on, and was continued sporadically till after the death of Father Perboyre in 1840, thousands of Christians gladly giving up their lives. Perboyre was born in 1802, and when he was fifteen he was fired by a sermon with the ambition to be a mis­sionary to the heathen; he joined the Congregation of the Mission (Lazarists, Vincentians), and was ordained in 1826. At first his desire to carry the gospel to foreign parts had to give way before the requirements of religious obedience.

His theological course had been a brilliant one, and so after his ordination he was appointed professor in the seminary of Saint-Flour, and two years later rector of the petit séminaire in the same place. His own personal goodness was very apparent in these employments, and in 1832 he was sent to Paris to be assistant-director of the general novitiate of his congregation. At intervals since the taking of his vows twelve years before he had asked to be sent to China, from whence reports of the sufferings and heroic deaths of the local Christians continued to come in, but it was not till 1835 that the permission was given.

In that year he arrived at Macao, and at once was set to learn Chinese, for which he showed such aptitude that at the end of four months he was appointed to the mission of Honan. On the eve of setting out he wrote to his brethren in Paris:

“If you could see me now in my Chinese ‘get-up’ you would see a very curious sight: my head shaved, a long pig-tail and moustaches, stammering my new language, eating with chop-sticks. They tell me that I don’t make a bad Chinaman. That is the only way to begin making oneself all things to all men: may we be able thus to win all to Jesus Christ”.

The Lazarists had elaborated a system of rescuing abandoned children, who are so numerous in China, and bringing them up in the faith. In this work Father Perboyre was especially active, and he devoted much of his time to instructing these children, illustrating his lessons by apt stories to which his very colloquial Chinese gave an added flavour. After two years at Honan he was moved to Hupeh, and here in September 1839 there was a sudden and unexplained renewal of persecution.

The missionaries went into hiding, but a neophyte betrayed Father Perboyre (with a horrid fitness, for thirty taels—about £9) and he was dragged in chains from functionary to functionary, each of whom questioned him and sent him on to someone else. Finally he came into the hands of the governor and mandarins of Wuchangfu. These required him to betray the hiding-places of his confreres and to trample on the cross. The sufferings endured by Father Perboyre were in­credible, in the literal sense of the word. Twenty times he was dragged before his judges to be bullied into compliance, and more than twenty times he was tortured because he refused. The ingenuity of the Chinese in inflicting physical pain is notorious, and Father Perboyre underwent torments beside which those invented by hagiographers for some of the martyrs of the Ten Persecutions are crude and clumsy. He was branded on the face with four characters, which stood for “teacher of a false religion”, and a Chinese priest who bribed his way into his prison described him as a mass of open wounds, his very bones in places exposed. On September 11, 1840, almost a year after his capture, Bd John Gabriel, with bare feet and only a pair of drawers under the red robe of the condemned, was strangled with five common criminals. He was buried beside another Lazarist martyr, Francis Regis Clet, who was also to be beatified. In China the feast of Bd John Gabriel is kept on November 7, the nearest convenient date to that of his beatifica­tion in 1889.

The murder of John Gabriel Perboyre was the occasion of the British govern­ment insisting on a clause in the Treaty of Nanking in 1842 which provided that any foreign missionary who was arrested should not be dealt with by the Chinese authorities but handed over to the nearest consul of his nation.

See the anonymous volume which appeared in 1853 under the title of Le disciple de Jesus; also the biography by Father Huonder, Der selige Yohann Gabriel Perboyre; L. Castagnola, Missionario martire (1940); and A. Chatelet, J. G. Perboyre, martyr (1943). Accounts will also be found in Leclercq, Les Martyrs, vol. x, and in the various works of A. Launay dealing with the Chinese missions. For other martyrs in China see under February 17 and references there.