Wednesday  Saints of this Day November  02 Quarto Nonas Novémbris  
Et álibi aliórum plurimórum sanctórum Mártyrum et Confessórum, atque sanctárum Vírginum.
And elsewhere in divers places, many other holy martyrs, confessors, and holy virgins.
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!  (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!).
November 2 Feast of All Souls:  PURGATORY - - CONFESSIONS FROM THE SAINTS
November is the month of the Holy Souls in Purgatory since 1888;
It seems clear that the privilege long enjoyed only in Spain and its dominions permitting priests to celebrate Mass thrice on All Souls’ day originated in the practice of the Dominican priory at Valencia, where it can be traced to the early fifteenth century. The number of influential people buried there in and around the church was considerable, and so many demands were made for special Masses on November a that these claims could only be satisfied by allowing friars of that community to offer two or even three Masses each on that day. This irreg­ularity was apparently tolerated by local authority and grew into an established custom. It was eventually sanctioned and extended to the whole kingdom by Pope Benedict XIV in 1748, and during the first world war, in 1915, Pope Benedict XV further extended the privilege to the whole Western church.

40 days for Life Day 35
Pray that God will continue to bless the efforts that have gone into
the 40 Days for Life campaign, as we trust Him for the results.


Commemorátio ómnium Fidélium Defunctórum. The Commemoration of all the Faithful Departed.
Solemnity of All Souls Purgatory

“God speaks to us every day by His creatures and by this universe which we behold.
He speaks to us by His gospel, wherein He teaches us what we ought to do both for others and ourselves.
What more can Marcian say that can be of use?”

387 St. Marcian Hermit and founder born in Cyrrhus; miracles

Mary Mother of GOD 15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary
 

Six Canonized on Feast of Christ the King Nov 23 2014

CAUSES OF SAINTS April  2014

Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List

Acts of the Apostles

Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

How do I start the Five First Saturdays?

Mary Mother of GOD 15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary .

Pope Francis  PRAYER INTENTIONS FOR  November 2016
Universal: Countries Receiving Refugees

That the countries which take in a great number of displaced persons and refugees may find support for their efforts which show solidarity.

Evangelization: Collaboration of Priests and Laity
That within parishes, priests and lay people may collaborate in service to the community without giving in to the temptation of discouragement.

 40 days For Life September - November
40 days for Life Day 35
ABORTION IS A MORAL OUTRAGE
Marian spirituality: all are invited.


 November 02, 2015
 
The Commemoration of All the Faithful Departed (All Souls)

  The devil will try to upset you by accusing you of being unworthy of the blessings that you have received. Simply remain cheerful and do your best to ignore the devil's nagging. If need be even laugh at the absurdity of the situation. Satan, the epitome of sin itself, accuses you of unworthiness! When the devil reminds you of your past, remind him of his future! -- St. Theresa of Avila

My God, do Thou strengthen and increase my faith in Thy divinity that I may adore it, and love it, and confess it even at the peril of my own life;
let me be only too happy if I should be called to shed my blood in defense of it.

-- St. Peter Eymard

Make a Novena and pray the Rosary to Our Lady of Victory
between October 27th and Election Day
Mary Mother of GOD
November 2 - Our Lady of Emminont (Abbeville, France)
          
Father J. Sigurd “Aspects of France” May 15, 1975 (Aspects de la France)
With a Rosary around the Neck and a Weapon on their Shoulder
Priests and the faithful of the Catholic village of Honai, Vietnam, told me that they would not flee in front of the triumphant tank crew members of Communist atheist regime who were just within five kilometers of their homes.
Women, children and old men of this fierce and resolved community gathered in prayer in well-lit churches.
The men, trained in self-defense battalions, a rosary around the neck, armed with old rifles, were slaughtered while trying to prohibit the access of the North Vietnamese armored tanks into their parishes.
Father Hoang Quynh, priest of Cholon, refugee of North Vietnam himself, once told me:
Communism is the death of us. When we were in Tonkin, we thought we had a vague idea of the plans they had in store for the southern populations: barbaric acts, torture, imprisonment, the faith tracked down in the cities and the countryside - in our hearts - that was the plan. The border between China and the Mekong Delta is a painful road for Catholics. Thousands of graves mark out that border already and there will be thousands of others around Saigon, Hué and Dalat. This is the price that we will have to pay. We are ready. Each cross will bear witness to mankind.

November 2 - Our Lady of Montligeon (France, 1843)
Prayer to Our Lady of Montligeon

Our Lady, deliverer of all mankind, Have mercy on all our dearly departed, Especially those who are most In need of the Lord's mercy.  Intercede for those who have passed away So that the purifying love of God May lead them to full deliverance.  May our prayers, united with the prayers Of the whole Church, Obtain for them a joy beyond all expectations,  And bring consolation and relief To our friends in sorrow and distress Here on earth. Mother of the Church, On our journey towards life everlasting, As pilgrims here on earth, Help us to live better lives each day...Heal the wounds of our hearts and souls. Help us to become witnesses of the Invisible,  To already seek that which the eye cannot see. Make us apostles of Hope, Like watchmen awaiting the dawn.
Refuge of Sinners and Queen of All Saints, Gather us all together one day in the Father's House, For the eternal Resurrection, Through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.   Adapted from http://www.sanctuaire-montligeon.com/en

PURGATORY - - CONFESSIONS FROM THE SAINTS

The Church, to which Jesus Christ promised the presence of the Holy Ghost and which therefore cannot be in error or mislead us, clearly teaches us the existence of PurgatoryIt is then certain that there exists a place where the souls of the just complete the expiation of their sins before they are admitted to the joys of heaven.  From Writings of Saint John Vianne Curé d'Ars.

How right are they who say that the memory of the dead fades with the notes of the passing bell.
Suffer, poor souls; in vain do you weep in the fire lit by God's justice.
No one is listening to you, no one will bring you succor.

Yet how quickly we could empty purgatory if we but really wished to.

Sister Faustina  (1905-1938) Feast Oct 05,  was shown by Jesus  Heaven, hell and Purgatory, where she was to suffer one day there.  God is just in all that he does. When he rewards us for the smallest of our good deeds, he does so far beyond anything that we could desire; a good thought, a good wish--that is to say a wish to do good even if it cannot be carried out--all are rewarded.  But also when it is time for him to punish us he does so with severity, and we will be thrown into purgatory for even the smallest offense.  We cannot doubt the truth of this, for we see in the lives of the saints that several of them have gone to heaven only after first passing through the flames of purgatory.

Saint Peter Damian {(born 1007, Ravenna—died Feb. 22, 1072, Faenze; feast day February 21) Italian cardinal and Doctor of the Church.} tells that his sister remained in purgatory several years for having once listened to a dirty song with a certain amount of pleasure.

The story is told of two monks who promised each other that the first one to die would return to tell the other what had happened to him. One of them died and God allowed him to appear to his friend. He told him that he had spent fifteen days in purgatory for having been too fond of having his own way, and when his friend congratulated him on having spent so short a time there, he replied: ‘I would rather have been flayed alive for 10,000 years, for even that would have been nothing when compared with the tortures that I endured in the flames.’

A priest told one of his friends that God had condemned him to several months in purgatory
for having delayed the execution of a will which made provision for good works.


Alas, my brothers, how many of us have just such a fault on our consciences?
How many are there who perhaps eight or ten years ago were charged by their parents or friends to give alms and have Masses said for them, but have done nothing?

But perhaps some of you will tell me: ‘Our parents lived good lives, they were upright people.
Yet how little it takes to be sent to those fires of purgatory!

Remember that Albert the Great {St Albert the Great--1207-1280 Feast day Nov 15},
whose virtue shone with such extraordinary brilliance, said about that.
“One day he told one of his friends that God had sent him to purgatory for having felt just a little conceited about his learning. And what is even more astonishing is that some of the saints, even canonized ones, have been through purgatory.”

 
A long time after his death, Saint Severin, Archbishop of Cologne {420 St. Severinus Bishop of BORDEAUX; distinguished himself by his zeal against Arianism;
Burdígalæ sancti Severíni, Epíscopi Coloniénsis et Confessóris.
    At Bordeaux, St. Severin, bishop of Cologne and confessor
[Feast Day Oct 23},
appeared to a friend and told him that he had been in purgatory
for having postponed until evening a prayer that he should have said in the morning.

How many years in purgatory await those Christians who find it easy
to postpone their prayers on the excuse that they have a lot of work to do!
If we sincerely desired the joy of possessing God we would avoid the little faults as well as the great ones, since separation from God is such a fearful torture for these poor souls.

The Church has encouraged prayer for the dead from the earliest times as an act of Christian charity.
If we had no care for the dead, Augustine noted,
we would not be in the habit of praying for them.
Yet pre-Christian rites for the deceased kept such a strong hold on the superstitious imagination that a liturgical commemoration was not observed until the early Middle Ages, when monastic communities began to mark an annual day of prayer for departed members.


In the middle of the 11th century, St. Odilo, abbot of Cluny (France), decreed that all Cluniac monasteries offer special prayers and sing the Office for the Dead on November 2, the day after the feast of All Saints.
The custom spread from Cluny
and finally adopted throughout the Roman Church.



The theological underpinning of the feast is the acknowledgment of human frailty. Since few people achieve perfection in this life but, rather, go to the grave still scarred with traces of sinfulness, some period of purification seems necessary before a soul comes face-to-face with God.
THE COUNCIL OF TRENT
Session XXV - which is the ninth and last under the Supreme Pontiff, Pius IV,
begun the third and closed on the fourth day of December, 1563
 affirmed this purgatory state insisted that prayers of the living can speed the process of purification.
Decree Concerning Purgatory
    Since the Catholic Church, instructed by the Holy Ghost, has, following the sacred writings and the ancient tradition of the Fathers, taught in sacred councils and very recently in this ecumenical council that there is a purgatory, and that the souls there detained are aided by the suffrages of the faithful and chiefly by the acceptable sacrifice of the altar, the holy council commands the bishops that they strive diligently to the end that the sound doctrine of purgatory, transmitted by the Fathers and sacred councils, be believed and maintained by the faithful of Christ, and be everywhere taught and preached.
    The more difficult and subtle questions, however, and those that do not make for edification and from which there is for the most part no increase in piety, are to be excluded from popular instructions to uneducated people.
    Likewise, things that are uncertain or that have the appearance of falsehood they shall not permit to be made known publicly and discussed. But those things that tend to a certain kind of curiosity or superstition, or that savor of filthy lucre, they shall prohibit as scandals and stumbling-blocks to the faithful.
    The bishops shall see to it that the suffrages of the living, that is, the sacrifice of the mass, prayers, alms and other works of piety which they have been accustomed to perform for the faithful departed, be piously and devoutly discharged in accordance with the laws of the Church, and that whatever is due on their behalf from testamentary bequests or other ways, be discharged by the priests and ministers of the Church and others who are bound to render this service not in a perfunctory manner, but diligently and accurately.


Superstition still clung to the observance. Medieval popular belief held that the souls in purgatory could appear on this day in the form of witches, toads or will-o’-the-wisps. Graveside food offerings supposedly eased the rest of the dead.
Observances of a more religious nature have survived. These include public processions or private visits to cemeteries and decorating graves with flowers and lights. This feast is observed with great fervor in Mexico.

  Whether or not one should pray for the dead is one of the great arguments which divide Christians.
Appalled by the abuse of indulgences in the Church of his day, Martin Luther rejected the concept of purgatory.
Yet prayer for a loved one is, for the believer, a way of erasing any distance, even death.
In prayer we stand in God's presence in the company of someone we love, even if that person has gone before us into death.


  “We must not make purgatory into a flaming concentration camp on the brink of hell—or even a ‘hell for a short time.’
It is blasphemous to think of it as a place where a petty God exacts the last pound—or ounce—of flesh...
St. Catherine of Genoa {Feast day September 15, mystic of the 15th century, wrote ‘fire’ of purgatory is God’s love ‘burning’ the soul so that, at last, the soul is wholly aflame.  It is the pain of wanting to be made totally worthy of One who is seen as infinitely lovable, the pain of desire for union that is now absolutely assured, but not yet fully tasted”
(Leonard Foley, O.F.M., Believing in Jesus).

November 2 – Coptic Church: Memorial of the Holy Family in Egypt 
 A new pilgrimage in Egypt
 "In the Footsteps of the Holy Family" is the new pilgrimage route proposed by the Egyptian Ministry of Tourism in partnership with the Coptic Orthodox Church.

The flight of the Holy Family to Egypt is reported in the second chapter of Saint Matthew’s Gospel. When King Herod learned of the birth of the "King of the Jews" in Bethlehem, he feared for his power and sent his soldiers to kill all the male children under two years of age. Warned in a dream of this cruel plan, Joseph took the infant Jesus and his mother, as the Gospel says, and all three fled to Egypt, where they stayed for three and a half years, until the death of Herod. The Gospel says no more about the Holy Family’s stay in Egypt.

According to the Coptic Church, the Holy Family first stayed in the Nile Delta, then went to Cairo, then to Memphis, before going south and to Upper Egypt. Their journey probably took them to Doronka just before Assiut, where we can visit the Coptic Orthodox Monastery of the Virgin Mary.

Their long, adventurous journey is now relived through this new pilgrimage that will take pilgrims to meaningful places which bear the traces of the passage of Mary, Joseph and the Child Jesus. Source: fr.radiovaticana.va

         Publius, Victor, Hermas, & Papias Martyrs in northwest Africa
  303 St. Justus of Trieste Martyr;
devoted to penance and charity; Records at the cathedral in Trieste show that his relics were still there in 1040 and 1624
  304 St. Victorinus of Pettau Bishop and martyr Originally a Greek
  315 St. CarteriusMartyr with 9 other companions soldiers of Emperor Licinius Licinianus
  334 St. Theodotus Bishop of Laodicea signature to Council of Nicaea 325
  345 St. Acyndinus & Companions Persian Christian priests and clerical assistants martyred by King Shapur II
  362 Saint Eustochium of Tarsus died in prison, while engaged in prayer
  387 St. Marcian Hermit and founder born in Cyrrhus; miracles; “God speaks to us every day by His creatures and by this universe which we behold. He speaks to us by His gospel, wherein He teaches us what we ought to do both for others and ourselves. What more can Marcian say that can be of use?” 
St. Maura the Irish sister of St. Brigid Scottish princesses martyred by pagan outlaws while pilgrimage to Rome
  523 Saint Ambrose abbot of Sainte Barbe, near Lyons
  582 Saint Ambrose of the abbey of Agaune, Saint Moritz, Switzerland
  699 Saint George Bishop of Vienne
10th v. Scottish Saint Baya instructed Saint Maura in the eremitical life
1045 St. Amicus Benedictine hermit priest esteemed in Monte Cassino
1340 St. Jorandus Benedictine hermit at Kergrist and Saint-Juhec in Pedernec
1430 Blessed Thomas of Walden King Henry V chose him as his confessor and died in his arms
1583 Bl. John Bodey English martyr and schoolmaster
1843  Our Lady of Montligeon France 


THE COMMEMORATION OF ALL THE FAITHFUL DEPARTED, COMMONLY CALLED ALL SOULS’ DAY

THE Church of Christ is composed of three parts the Triumphant in Heaven, the Militant on earth, and the Patient, or suffering, in Purgatory. * {* It may be explained to the non-Catholic reader that Purgatory is the place or state in which souls, who deserve not the punishment of eternal loss but nevertheless are yet unfit for the vision of God, suffer for a while and are cleansed after death before they go to Heaven. The suffering of Purgatory consists in the pain of intense longing for God, whose blissful vision is delayed, and also, as is commonly taught, in some pain of sense. That this last is inflicted through the medium of material fire is not part of the official teaching of the Church.}

Our charity embraces all the members of Christ. Our love for Him engages and binds us to His whole Body, and teaches us to share both the afflictions and the blessings of all that are comprised in it. The communion of saints whom we profess implies a communication of certain good works and a mutual intercourse among all the members of Christ. This we maintain with the saints in Heaven by thanking and praising God for their triumphs and crowns, imploring their intercession, and receiving the help of their prayers for uh. All Saints’ day is set apart in a special way for this purpose, and on the following day the Church on earth particularly emphasizes her relations with the souls in Purgatory by soliciting the divine mercy in their favour. Nor does it seem to be doubtful that they pray also for us; though the Church never addresses public suffrages to them, not being warranted by primitive practice and tradition so to do.
It is certainly a “holy and wholesome thought to pray for the dead” (a Machabees. xii 46).
   Holy because most acceptable to God, to whom no sacrifices are more honourable and pleasing than those of charity and mercy, especially spiritual. The souls in Purgatory are heirs of Heaven, the eternal possession of the Kingdom is secured to them, and their names are written there. But patient suffering of punishment incurred must first wholly cleanse them. Such is God’s hatred of the least sin, and such is the opposition, which the stain of sin bears to His infinite justice and holiness. His mercy recommends them to the charitable aid that we, as their fellow-members in Christ, have in our power to afford them. If a compassionate charity towards all that are in any distress, even towards the most undeserving, be an essential ingredient of a Christian spirit and one in which the very soul of religion and piety towards God consists, how much more should we exert our charity for those in spiritual need, no longer able to help themselves, and perhaps bound to us by ties of blood or friendship?

The custom of offering the Holy Sacrifice for an individual deceased person on a particular day was, of course, firmly established long before a special day was set aside for the memorial of all the dead in general. The first formal testimony to a collective day of the dead is found in the first half of the ninth century, when it was the custom in monasteries to commemorate their own dead and their benefactors all together on one day, the date varying. The earliest definite suggestion of a connection between the feast of All Saints and a commemoration of All Souls seems to be supplied by Amalarius early in the ninth century. In his De ordine anti­phonarii he writes, “After the office of the Saints I have inserted the office for the dead for many pass out of this world without at once being admitted into the company of the blessed.” It is quite possible that this passage may have been before the mind of St Odilo of Cluny two hundred years later, when he directed the congregation of which he was supreme head to observe November a as a day of commemoration of all the faithful departed, on which the office of the dead was to he said and Masses of requiem celebrated.

   In any case, as stated above, the idea of a collective memory of the departed was already familiar. For example, in the year 800 a compact was drawn up between the monasteries of Saint Gall and Reichenau concerning their mutual suffrages for each other’s deceased members. Besides praying for every monk when his death was announced, both communities agreed to observe November 14 in every year as a day of commemoration of the religious who had passed away in either abbey. On that occasion each priest would offer Mass three times and the rest recite the whole psalter for the souls of the departed of both houses. It is noteworthy that November 14 was the beginning of what was known in Ireland as the “Moses Lent” in preparation for Christmas and Saint Gall was, of course, an Irish foundation.

   For the rather extravagant story of the hermit who had heard the cries of rage of the demons complaining that the prayers said at Cluny rescued the souls of those whom they were torturing from them, we have the contemporary authority of Ralph Glaber and of others later. We are told that St Odilo, on this being reported to him, was moved to issue his famous decree. But the text of the ordinance says nothing of this tale of the hermit it merely states that, “as the feast of all the blessed saints was already celebrated throughout the Church of God, so it seemed desirable that at Cluny they should also keep with joyous affection the memory of all the faithful departed who have lived from the beginning of the world until the end”. We have a detailed account of how in St Odilo’s own lifetime this observance was carried out at the monastery of Farfa, near Spoleto, in Italy. It seems to have spread widely and rather rapidly, though there is no trace of any papal enactment extending it to the Church in general. On the other hand two or three centuries passed before we find the entry Commemoratio animarum com­monly occurring under November 2 in calendars or martyrologies. A striking illustration of this may be noted at Canterbury.

 Somewhere about 1075 the archbishop, Lanfranc, promulgated certain decrees for the Benedictine monks. In these much is made of the high Mass for the dead on November 2 before which on the eve, all the bells were to be rung and other solemnities observed. None the less, though we have four or five Canterbury calendars of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, no one of them at that date makes mention of any such celebration. There is, however, a definite mention of All Souls’ Day in the so-called Protadius martyrology, compiled at Besançon in the middle of the eleventh century.

It seems clear that the privilege long enjoyed only in Spain and its dominions permitting priests to celebrate Mass thrice on All Souls’ day originated in the practice of the Dominican priory at Valencia, where it can be traced to the early fifteenth century. The number of influential people buried there in and around the church was considerable, and so many demands were made for special Masses on November a that these claims could only be satisfied by allowing friars of that community to offer two or even three Masses each on that day. This irreg­ularity was apparently tolerated by local authority and grew into an established custom. It was eventually sanctioned and extended to the whole kingdom by Pope Benedict XIV in 1748, and during the first world war, in 1915, Pope Benedict XV further extended the privilege to the whole Western church.

With a certain nice appropriateness the Armenians make a special commemoration of the dead on Easter Monday.

On the general question of observance of the Connmemoratio omnium fidelium defunctorum, consult Cabrol in DAC., vol. v, cc. 1419-1420; and Leclercq in the same, vol. iv, cc. 427- 456, with vol. xii, CC. 34-38; also Kellner, Heortology, pp. 326-328; Schuster, The Sacra­mentary, vol. v, pp. 213-231 and H. Thurston, The Memory of our Dead, pp. 501-534 and 224-241. For further illustrations of folk-lore customs cf. Bächtold-Stäubli, Handwörterbuch des deutschen Aberglaubens, vol. i, pp. 267-273; for the Canterbury calendars, E. Bishop, The Bosworth Psalter, pp; 68-69, 113; and for Spain. Villanueva, Viage literario, vol ii pp 5 seq. For the “Moses Lent”, see Analecta Bollandiana vol lix (1941), p 234, n. 3; and J. Ryan, Irish Monasticism (1931). pp. 392-393.

November 2, Feast of All Souls

November 2 - OUR LADY OF MONTLIGEON (France, 1884)
Mary and the Souls of Purgatory (II): No Unholy Soul Can Be Happy in Heaven
I answer as follows: That, even supposing a man of unholy life were suffered to enter heaven, he would not be happy there; so that it would be no mercy to permit him to enter. (...)

How forlorn would he wander through the courts of heaven! He would find no one like himself; he would see in every direction the marks of God's holiness, and these would make him shudder. He would feel himself always in His presence. He could no longer turn his thoughts another way, as he does now, when conscience reproaches him. He would know that the Eternal Eye was ever upon him; and that Eye of holiness, which is joy and life to holy creatures, would seem to him an Eye of wrath and punishment.
God cannot change His nature. Holy He must ever be. But while He is holy, no unholy soul can be happy in heaven.
John Henry Cardinal Newman Sermon (1: 3 & 8, 1834 - 1869)

The Church has encouraged prayer for the dead from the earliest times as an act of Christian charity. "If we had no care for the dead," Augustine noted, "we would not be in the habit of praying for them." Yet pre-Christian rites for the deceased kept such a strong hold on the superstitious imagination that a liturgical commemoration was not observed until the early Middle Ages, when monastic communities began to mark an annual day of prayer for the departed members.


In the middle of the 11th century, St. Odilo, abbot of Cluny (France), decreed that all Cluniac monasteries offer special prayers and sing the Office for the Dead on November 2, the day after the feast of All Saints. The custom spread from Cluny and was finally adopted throughout the Roman Church.

The theological underpinning of the feast is the acknowledgment of human frailty. Since few people achieve perfection in this life but, rather, go to the grave still scarred with traces of sinfulness, some period of purification seems necessary before a soul comes face-to-face with God. The Council of Trent affirmed this purgatory state and insisted that the prayers of the living can speed the process of purification.

Superstition still clung to the observance. Medieval popular belief held that the souls in purgatory could appear on this day in the form of witches, toads or will-o’-the-wisps. Graveside food offerings supposedly eased the rest of the dead.

Observances of a more religious nature have survived. These include public processions or private visits to cemeteries and decorating graves with flowers and lights. This feast is observed with great fervor in Mexico.

 November 2, 2009 Feast of All Souls 
The Church has encouraged prayer for the dead from the earliest times as an act of Christian charity. "If we had no care for the dead," Augustine noted, "we would not be in the habit of praying for them." Yet pre-Christian rites for the deceased kept such a strong hold on the superstitious imagination that a liturgical commemoration was not observed until the early Middle Ages, when monastic communities began to mark an annual day of prayer for the departed members.

In the middle of the 11th century, St. Odilo, abbot of Cluny (France), decreed that all Cluniac monasteries offer special prayers and sing the Office for the Dead on November 2, the day after the feast of All Saints. The custom spread from Cluny and was finally adopted throughout the Roman Church.

The theological underpinning of the feast is the acknowledgment of human frailty. Since few people achieve perfection in this life but, rather, go to the grave still scarred with traces of sinfulness, some per iod of purification seems necessary before a soul comes face-to-face with God. The Council of Trent affirmed this purgatory state and insisted that the prayers of the living can speed the process of purification.

Superstition still clung to the observance. Medieval popular belief held that the souls in purgatory could appear on this day in the form of witches, toads or will-o’-the-wisps. Graveside food offerings supposedly eased the rest of the dead.

Observances of a more religious nature have survived. These include public processions, private visits to cemeteries and decorating graves with flowers and lights. This feast is observed with great fervor in Mexico.

Comment:  Whether or not one should pray for the dead is one of the great arguments which divide Christians. Appalled by the abuse of indulgences in the Church of his day, Martin Luther rejected the concept of purgatory. Yet prayer for a loved one is, for the believer, a way of erasing any distance, even death. In prayer we stand in God's presence in the company of someone we love, even if that person has gone before us into death.

Quote: “We must not make purgatory into a flaming concentration camp on the brink of hell—or even a ‘hell for a short time.’ It is blasphemous to think of it as a place where a petty God exacts the last pound—or ounce—of flesh.... St. Catherine of Genoa, a mystic of the 15th century, wrote that the ‘fire’ of purgatory is God’s love ‘burning’ the soul so that, at last, the soul is wholly aflame. It is the pain of wanting to be made totally worthy of One who is seen as infinitely lovable, the pain of desire for union that is now absolutely assured, but not yet fully tasted” (Leonard Foley, O.F.M., Believing in Jesus).
Publius, Victor, Hermas, & Papias Martyrs in northwest Africa
In Africa natális sanctórum Mártyrum Públii, Victóris, Hermétis, et Pápiæ.
    In Africa, the birthday of the holy martyrs Publius, Victor, Hermes, and Papias.
Martyrs in northwest Africa (Benedictines). MM (RM)
304 St. Victorinus of Pettau Bishop and martyr Originally a Greek
Pœtovióne, in Pannónia superióre, natális sancti Victoríni, ejúsdem civitátis Epíscopi, qui, post multa édita scripta (ut sanctus Hierónymus testátur), in persecutióne Diocletiáni, martyrio coronátus est.
    At Pettau in Styria, the birthday of St. Victorinus, bishop of that city, who, after publishing many writings, as is attested to by St. Jerome, was crowned with martyrdom in the persecution of Diocletian.

ST Jerome speaks well of this early exegete and tells us, in the words of Alban Butler, “that his works were sublime in sense though the Latin style was low, the author being by birth a Grecian”. From being a rhetorician he became bishop at Pettau in Upper Pannonia and he wrote commentaries on a number of books of the Old and New Testaments. St Jerome quotes from these, but he sometimes qualifies his good opinion of the bishop. Victorinus opposed certain heresies of his time but was himself reputed to be inclined to Millenarianism, i.e. expectation of a temporal reign of Christ on earth for a thousand years. St Victorinus is believed to have died a martyr in the persecution under Diocletian. He was at one time supposed to have been the first bishop of Poitiers, owing to an erroneous latinization of the name of his see.

The passio of St. Victorinus having perished, we know little concerning him beyond what can be gleaned from casual references in the writings of St Jerome, Optatus of Milevis and Cassiodorus. See the Acta Sanctorum, November, vol. i. This Victorinus does not seem to have been commemorated in the Hieronymianum, but Florus of Lyons assumed that a St Victor, whose name does occur on November 2, referred to him. See Quentin, Martyrologes historiques, pp. 310 and 380; and Bardenhewer, Geschichte de, altkirchilchen Literatur, 2nd ed., vol. ii, pp. 657-663. 

He became bishop of Pettau, in Pannonia (later Styria, Austria). He was martyred during the persecutions of Emperor Diocletian (r. 284-305). Victorinus was also the author of several biblical cornrnentaries, although he may have been an adherent of Millenarianism, a heresy of that time.

Victorinus of Pettau BM (RM)  Born in Greece; died in Styria, c. 303. Victorinus became bishop of Pettau in Styria, Upper Pannonia, and was martyred during the persecutions of Diocletian.
One of his beliefs was that Christ would come a second time to reign on earth for a thousand years. This was later considered an error and a heresy. The result, sadly, is that scarcely any of Victorinus's writings have survived, for--although a saintly man and a martyr--his views were considered tainted. All we possess is a commentary he wrote on the Book of revelation and another book, a mixture of speculative science and theology, On the creation of the world.

In fact he was the first Christian ever to write Latin expositions of the Scriptures. Saint Jerome admired him, and tells us he wrote commentaries on many Old and New Testament books. He reports that, although the Latin was vulgar, Victorinus was a bishop of great learning. Thus a piece of unnecessary censorship has denied us access to the mind and thinking of one of our early Christian forefathers. Even the account of his sufferings and death at the hands of the emperor has disappeared (Benedictines, Bentley, Encyclopedia, Husenbeth).
303 St. Justus of Trieste Martyr
Tergéste pássio beáti Justi, qui in eádem persecutióne, sub Manátio Præside, martyrium consummávit.
    At Trieste, blessed Justus, who fulfilled his martyrdom in the same persecution under the governor Manatius.
at Trieste who was thrown into the sea. He is still venerated at Trieste, Italy.
Justus of Trieste M (RM) Died 289 or 303. Although Saint Justus was citizen of Trieste devoted to penance and charity, he was martyred under Diocletian by being weighted down and cast into the sea. A priest named Sebastian buried his body when it washed up on the shore. Records at the cathedral in Trieste show that his relics were still there in 1040 and 1624 (Benedictines, Encyclopedia, Farmer). In art, Saint Justus is shown in classical dress, holding a palm and a cathedral, with flowers across his chest. He is still much honored as the patron of Trieste (Roeder). The antiquity of his cultus is demonstrated by an extant 6th-century mosaic (Farmer).
 315 St. Carterius Martyr with 9 other companions soldiers of Emperor Licinius Licinianus
Sebáste, in Arménia, sanctórum Cartérii, Styríaci, Tobíæ, Eudóxii, Agápii et Sociórum Mártyrum, sub Licínio Imperatóre.
    At Sebaste in Armenia, the Saints Carterius, Styriacus, Tobias, Eudoxius, Agapius, and their companions, martyrs under Emperor Licinius.
Styriacus, Tobias, Eudoxius, Agapius, and five other companions burned at the stake in Sebaste. They were soldiers in the army of Emperor Licinius Licinianus.
Carterius, Styriacus, Tobias, Eudoxius, Agapius & Comp. MM (RM) Ten Christian soldiers in the army of the emperor Licinius, burnt at the stake at Sebaste in Armenia (Benedictines).

334 St. Theodotus Bishop of Laodicea signature to Council of Nicaea 325  
Laodicéæ, in Syria, sancti Theódoti Epíscopi, qui non solum verbis, sed rebus quoque et virtútibus fuit ornátus.
    At Laodicea in Syria, St. Theodotus, a bishop powerful in words and adorned with good works and virtues.
(modern Turkey) who was involved in the Arian controversy of the era. A friend of the historian Eusebius of Caesarea (who was an Arian), he was much praised by the writer. A participant in the deliberations of the Council of Nicaea (325), he was a supporter of the Semi-Arian position but nevertheless gave his signature to the orthodox decrees of the council.
Theodotus of Laodicea B (RM). Theodotus was bishop of Laodicea at the time of the Arian troubles and a great friend of the Arianizing Eusebius the historian, who is loud in his praise. Theodotus subscribed to the Nicene formula, but seems to have sided with the Arians and the semi-Arians until his death (Benedictines).

387 St. Marcian Hermit and founder born in Cyrrhus; miracles; “God speaks to us every day by His creatures and by this universe which we behold. He speaks to us by His gospel, wherein He teaches us what we ought to do both for others and ourselves. What more can Marcian say that can be of use?”
 [A titular see of Syria. The city of the same name was the capital of the extensive district of Cyrrhestica, between the plain of Antioch and Commagene.]
Cyri, in Syria, sancti Marciáni Confessóris.    At Cyrus in Syria, St. Marcian, confessor.

THE city of Cyrrhus in Syria was the birthplace of St Marcian; his father was of a patrician family. Marcian himself left his friends and country and, that he might not do things by halves, retired into the desert of Chalcis, between Antioch and the Euphrates. He chose in it the most remote part and shut himself up in a small enclosure, wherein he built himself a cell so narrow and low that he could neither stand nor lie in it without bending his body. This solitude was to him a paradise, and his whole employment was to sing psalms, read, pray and work. Bread was all his food and this in a small quantity; but he never went a day without taking some, lest he should not have strength to do what God required of him.

   The supernatural light which he received in contemplation gave him a wonderful knowledge of the great truths and mysteries of faith; and notwithstanding his care to live unknown to men, the reputation of his holiness spread abroad and he was prevailed upon to admit two first disciples, Eusebius and Agapitus. In time St Marcian had a considerable body of followers, over whom he appointed Eusebius abbot. Once St Flavian, Patriarch of Antioch, and other bishops paid him a visit together, and begged he would give them a spiritual conference according to his custom. The dignity of this company alarmed Marcian and he stood some time silent. Being urged to speak, he said, “God speaks to us every day by His creatures and by this universe which we behold. He speaks to us by His gospel, wherein He teaches us what we ought to do both for others and ourselves. What more can Marcian say that can be of use?”

St Marcian wrought several miracles and was greatly humiliated by the reputa­tion of a wonderworker, which consequently attached to him. He would not listen to requests for any miraculous intercession, and when a certain hermit came on behalf of a man of Beroea to get some oil blessed for his sick daughter, St Marcian refused peremptorily. But at the same hour the girl recovered.

   Marcian lived to a considerable age, and during his last years was troubled by the indecent importunity of those who looked forward to having the custody of his dead body. Several people went so far as to build chapels in different places wherein to bury it, among them being his nephew Alipius. St Marcian therefore made Eusebius promise to bury him secretly. This accordingly was done and it was not till fifty years after the saint’s death that the place of burial was disclosed, when the relics were solemnly translated and became an object of pilgrimage.

We are entirely indebted to Theodoret’s Religious History for our knowledge of St Marcian. The Bollandists have reprinted his Greek text with Latin translations and com­ments in the Acta Sanctorum, November, vol. i.

Marcian was of a noble family. He left his position at the emperor’s court and a military career to become a hermit at Chalcis, the desert near Antioch. There he attracted many disciples and began a monastic group. He was renowned for his holiness and miracles.

Marcian of Chalcis, Hermit (RM) Born in Cyrrhus, Syria. Marcian was a patrician who left the emperor's court and gave up a brilliant military career in order to lead the solitary life in the desert of Chalcis, which lies between Antioch and the Euphrates. He chose the most remote regions of the desert in order to hide himself away in a cell so narrow and low that he could neither stand nor lie in it without doubling over. As hard as he tried to hide his singular struggle for holiness, his reputation grew. First he attracted two illustrious disciples, Eusebius and Agapitus, but more and more followed. Marcian thereupon appointed Eusebius as abbot over the desert monks who came seeking Marcian.
Marcian was a wonder-worker, though he again tried to hide it. He would not listen to requests for miraculous intercession. When a hermit came to him on behalf of a Beroean to get some oil blessed for the man's sick daughter, Marcian refused peremptorily. At that same hour, however, the girl recovered.

One other item of note. As Marcian grew older, he felt that the vultures were indecently awaiting his death in hope of claiming his relics. Some, including his nephew Alipius, actually built chapels in which to house his future remains. Marcian coerced Eusebius to pledge to bury him secretly. Eusebius kept his promise. Marcian's relics were not discovered until fifty years after his death. At that time they were solemnly translated and became an object of pilgrimage (Benedictines, Encyclopedia, Walsh).

St. Maura the Irish sister of St. Brigid Scottish princesses martyred by pagan outlaws while pilgrimage to Rome
There legend is that they were Scottish princesses who were murdered by pagan outlaws while on a pilgrimage to Rome. Their bodies are enshrined there. They are believed to be the same St. Maura and St. Britt who were 5th century soldiers per St. Euphronius and St. Martin of Tours. Also there is another legend of them by St. Baya.

345 St. Acyndinus & Companions Persian Christian priests and clerical assistants martyred by King Shapur II
In Pérside sanctórum Mártyrum Acíndyni, Pegásii, Aphthónii, Elpidíphori et Anempodísti, cum plúrimis Sóciis.
    In Persia, the holy martyrs Acindynus, Pegasius, Aphthonius, Elpiderphorus, and Anempodistus, with many companions.
With Pegasius, Aphthonius, Elpidephours, and Anempodistus, Persian Christians, ordained priests, and with their companion clerical assistants, martyred. These Christians were arrested and slain for the faith during the reign of King Shapur II.
Acindynus and Companions MM (RM). Acindynus, Pegasius, Aphthonius, Elpidephorus and Anempodistus were Persian Christians--priests and clerics--who suffered for the faith under Shapur II (Benedictines).

362 Saint Eustochium of Tarsus died in prison, while engaged in prayer
 Tarsi, in Cilícia, sanctæ Eustóchii, Vírginis et Mártyris; quæ, sub Juliáno Apóstata, post dira torménta, in oratióne réddidit spíritum.
    At Tarsus in Cilicia, in the reign of Julian the Apostate, St. Eustochium, virgin and martyr, who breathed her last in prayer in the midst of severe torments.

A maiden of Tarsus in Cilicia condemned to death under Julian the Apostate. She was barbarously tortured, and as a consequence died in prison, while engaged in prayer (Benedictines).
VM (RM)
523 Saint Ambrose abbot of Sainte Barbe, near Lyons
There were two abbots named Saint Ambrose of the abbey of Agaune, Saint Moritz, Switzerland. The former, who had formerly been abbot of Sainte Barbe, near Lyons, is the one commemorated by the Roman Martyrology (Benedictines).(RM)
582 Saint Ambrose of the abbey of Agaune, Saint Moritz, Switzerland
In monastério Agaunénsi, in Gállia, sancti Ambrósii Abbátis.
    In the monastery of St. Moritz in Switzerland, St. Ambrose, abbot. (Benedictines)
699 Saint George Bishop of Vienne
 Viénnæ, in Gállia, sancti Geórgii Epíscopi.    At Vienne in France, the bishop St. George.
Dates unknown; canonized in 1251. Bishop Saint George of Vienne, France, probably flourished at the beginning of the 8th century, though some put November 2, 699, as the date of his death (Benedictines).B (RM)
10th v.Scottish Saint Baya instructed Saint Maura in the eremitical life VV (AC)
The Scottish Saint Baya instructed Saint Maura in the eremitical life. Followers later gathered around Maura, who organized them into a community of which she was abbess. Some authors identify Saint Baya with Saint Begha or Bee. They might also be identical to Saints Maura and Britta (Benedictines, Delaney).

1045 St. Amicus Benedictine hermit priest esteemed in Monte Cassino
Italy. A hermit priest who entered St. Peter's Monastery at Fonteavel lana.
Amicus of Rambara, OSB (AC) Died early 11th century. Abbot of Rambara (Benedictines).

1340 St. Jorandus Benedictine hermit at Kergrist and Saint-Juhec in Pedernec.
Jorandus of Kergrist, OSB Hermit (AC). A monk-hermit at Kergrist and later Saint-Juhec in Pédernec (Benedictines).

1430 Blessed Thomas of Walden; King Henry V chose him as his confessor and died in his arms  OC (PC)
(also known as Thomas Netter)
; miracles at his tomb

THIS holy and learned man has enjoyed a certain local cultus in the Carmelite Order which has, however, not yet been formally confirmed by the Holy See. He was an Essex man, born at Saffron Walden about 1375, his family name being Netter. He joined the Carmelites in London, studied at Oxford, where he took his doctorate in theology, and was ordained priest about 1400. He made a name for himself as a professor, and in 1409 was sent to the Council of Pisa, where he is said to have supported the election of Pope Alexander V. On his return to England Friar Thomas entered whole-heartedly into the opposition to the Lollards and other followers of the errors of John Wyclif, and he is regarded as the most able of the controversialists against them and their brethren on the continent—“never was there such a netter of heretics”.

He took part in the trials of their leaders, notably Sir John Oldcastle, and his chief writings were directed against their errors, notably his Doctrinale fidei. At this time the Carmelites were popular among the nobility as confessors, and Thomas was appointed to that office for King Henry V, being at the same time prior provincial of his order in England, though probably not yet forty years old. He was among the English representatives at the Council of Constance, which condemned the teachings of Wyclif and Flits, and immediately after was a member of an embassy to Poland on behalf of the pope and the emperor. He is said to have established friaries of his order in Lithuania and Prussia.

Friar Thomas was with Henry V in France in 1422, and the king died in his arms at Vincennes. 

The guardians of the infant Henry VI later appointed Thomas to be his tutor, so that in some degree he may have been responsible for that king’s subsequent holiness. Though Thomas was engaged so much in conflict with stubborn and sometimes violent heretics, he was himself of a kindly disposition and affectionate in his relations with others. He went to France with the boy king in 1430, and died at Rouen on November 2, leaving a reputation of holiness, which was confirmed by miracles at his tomb. Friar Thomas’s numerous written works, which received the praise of Pope Martin V, earned for him the title of Doctor praestantissimus, “the Pre-eminent Teacher”, and Doctor authenticus, the Authoritative Teacher”. His treatise De sacramentalibus includes a discussion of canonization, which is of much interest in the history of the subject.

Thomas Netter is not included by the Bollandists even among the praetermissi on this day. Neither is he mentioned in Stanton’s Menology, or in the martyrologies of Whitford or Wilson. The sources available have been indicated by B. Zimmerman in his Monumenta Historica Carmelitana (1907), pp. 442-482 and also by the same learned writer in the Catholic Encyclopedia, vol. x, pp. 764-765. cf. K. L. Hine, History of Hitchin (1927) vol. i, pp. 133-138 Netter was a young friar at Hitchin.

Born at Saffron Walden, 1375; died at Rouen, 1430. Thomas Netter was born at Saffron Walden and joined the Carmelites. He was an active opponent of Lollardism and a prominent member of the Council of Constance. King Henry V chose him as his confessor and died in his arms (Benedictines).
1583 Bl. John Bodey  English martyr and schoolmaster
He was born at Wells, Somerset, and educated at Oxford. Converting to the faith, John studied law at Douai in 1557 and returned to England to become a schoolmaster and to marry. When he repudiated King Henry VIII’s claim of supremacy in spiritual matters, he was arrested in 1550. John was imprisoned at Winchester until 1583, when he was taken on November 2 to Andover where he was hanged. He was beatified in 1929.
Blessed John Bodey M (AC) Born at Wells, Somerset, England; died at Andover, 1583; beatified in 1929. John Bodey was a fellow of New College, Oxford, who converted to Catholicism and studied law at Douai. John returned to England and became a schoolmaster.
He was condemned for repudiating the royal supremacy in spiritual matters and was hanged at Andover (Benedictines).

1843  Our Lady of Montligeon France
Prayer to Our Lady of Monligeon
Our Lady, freer of all mankind, Have mercy on all our dearly departed, Especially on those who are most In need of the Lord's mercy.  Intercede for those who have passed away So that the purifying love of God Leads them to full deliverance.  May our prayers, united with the prayers Of the whole Church, Obtain for them a joy beyond all expectations, And bring consolation and relief To our friends in sorrow and distress Here on earth.
Mother of the Church, On our journey towards life everlasting, As pilgrims here on earth, Help us to live better lives each day. Heal the wounds of our hearts and souls. Help us to become witnesses of the Invisible, Already seeking those good things that the eye cannot see. Make us apostles of Hope, Like watchmen awaiting the dawn.
Refuge of Sinners and Queen of All Saints, Gather us all together one day in the Father's House, For the eternal Resurrection, Through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.   Adapted from http://www.sanctuaire-montligeon.com/en


On Death and Life
"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!
   (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)


Month by Month of Saintly Dedications


The Rosary html Mary Mother of GOD -- Her Rosary Here
Mary Mother of GOD Mary's Divine Motherhood: FEASTS OF OUR LADY
     of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

May 9 – Our Lady of the Wood (Italy, 1607) 
Months of Dedication
January is the month of the Holy Name of Jesus since 1902;
March is the month of Saint Joseph since 1855;
May, the month of Mary, is the oldest and most well-known Marian month, officially since 1724;
June is the month of the Sacred Heart since 1873;
July is the month of the Precious Blood since 1850;
August is the month of the Immaculate Heart of Mary;
September is the month of Our Lady of Sorrows since 1857;
October is the month of the Rosary since 1868;
November is the month of the Holy Souls in Purgatory since 1888;
December is the month of the Immaculate Conception.

In all, five months of the year are dedicated to Mary.
The idea of dedicating months came from Rome and promotion of the month of Mary owes much to the Jesuits.  arras.catholique.fr


Pray that the witness of 40 Days for Life bears abundant fruit, and that we begin again each day to storm the gates of hell until God welcomes us into the gates of heaven.

If you seek patience, you will find no better example than the cross. Great patience occurs in two ways:
either when one patiently suffers much, or when one suffers things which one is able to avoid and yet does not avoid.
Christ endured much on the cross, and did so patiently, because when he suffered he did not threaten;
he was led like a sheep to the slaughter and he did not open his mouth.-- St. Thomas Aquinas


We begin our day by seeing Christ in the consecrated bread, and throughout the day we continue to see Him in the torn bodies of our poor. We pray, that is, through our work, performing it with Jesus, for Jesus and upon Jesus.
The poor are our prayer. They carry God in them. Prayer means praying everything, praying the work.
We meet the Lord who hungers and thirsts, in the poor.....and the poor could be you or I or any person kind enough to show us his or her love and to come to our place.
Because we cannot see Christ, we cannot express our love to Him in person.
But our neighbor we can see, and we can do for him or her what we would love to do for Jesus if He were visible.
-- Mother Teresa
My God, I believe, I adore, I trust and I love Thee.  I beg pardon for those who do not believe, do not adore, do not love Thee.  O most Holy trinity, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, I adore Thee profoundly.
 I offer Thee the most precious Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ, present in all the Tabernacles of the world,  in reparation for the outrages, sacrileges and indifference by which He is offended,
and by the infite merits of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

I beg the conversion of poor sinners,  Amen Fatima Prayer, Angel of Peace
Mary's Divine Motherhood
Pope Francis and Pope Benedict XVI { 2013 } Catholic Church In China { article here}
1648 to1930 St. Augustine Zhao Rong and 120 Companions Christianity arrived in China by way of Syria -- 600s.
        Depending on China's relations with outside world,
Christianity for centuries was free to grow or forced to operate secretly.

How do I start the Five First Saturdays? 
Called in the Gospel “the Mother of Jesus,” Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as “the Mother of my Lord” (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity. Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos). 
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
“The Blessed Virgin was eternally predestined, in conjunction with the incarnation of the divine Word, to be the Mother of God. By decree of divine Providence, she served on earth as the loving mother of the divine Redeemer, an associate of unique nobility, and the Lord's humble handmaid. She conceived, brought forth, and nourished Christ.”
The voice of the Father is heard, the Son enters the water, and the Holy Spirit appears in the form of a dove.
   THE spirit and example of the world imperceptibly instil the error into the minds of many that there is a kind of middle way of going to Heaven; and so, because the world does not live up to the gospel, they bring the gospel down to the level of the world. It is not by this example that we are to measure the Christian rule, but words and life of Christ. All His followers are commanded to labour to become perfect even as our heavenly Father is perfect, and to bear His image in our hearts that we may be His children. We are obliged by the gospel to die to ourselves by fighting self-love in our hearts, by the mastery of our passions, by taking on the spirit of our Lord.
   These are the conditions under which Christ makes His promises and numbers us among His children, as is manifest from His words which the apostles have left us in their inspired writings. Here is no distinction made or foreseen between the apostles or clergy or religious and secular persons. The former, indeed, take upon themselves certain stricter obligations, as a means of accomplishing these ends more perfectly; but the law of holiness and of disengagement of the heart from the world is geeral and binds all the followers of Christ.

Join Mary of Nazareth Project help us build the International Marian Center of Nazareth
http://www.worldpriest.com/
THE EUCHARIST, A MYSTERY TO BE BELIEVED POST-SYNODAL APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION
SACRAMENTUM CARITATIS OF THE HOLY FATHER BENEDICT XVI
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Miracles by Century 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000    1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800   1900  Miracles_BLay Saints
Morning Prayer and Hymn    Meditation of the Day    Prayer for Priests    Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List  Here
We are called upon with the whole Church militant on earth to join in praising and thanking God for the grace and glory he has bestowed on his saints. At the same time we earnestly implore Him to exert His almighty power and mercy in raising us from our miseries and sins, healing the disorders of our souls and leading us by the path of repentance to the company of His saints, to which He has called us.
   They were once what we are now, travellers on earth they had the same weaknesses, which we have. We have difficulties to encounter so had the saints, and many of them far greater than we can meet with; obstacles from kings and whole nations, sometimes from the prisons, racks and swords of persecutors. Yet they surmounted these difficulties, which they made the very means of their virtue and victories. It was by the strength they received from above, not by their own, that they triumphed. But the blood of Christ was shed for us as it was for them and the grace of our Redeemer is not wanting to us; if we fail, the failure is in ourselves.
   THE saints and just, from the beginning of time and throughout the world, who have been made perfect, everlasting monuments of God’s infinite power and clemency, praise His goodness without ceasing; casting their crowns before His throne they give to Him all the glory of their triumphs: “His gifts alone in us He crowns.”
“The saints must be honored as friends of Christ and children and heirs of God, as John the theologian and evangelist says: ‘But as many as received him, he gave them the power to be made the sons of God....’ Let us carefully observe the manner of life of all the apostles, martyrs, ascetics and just men who announced the coming of the Lord. And let us emulate their faith, charity, hope, zeal, life, patience under suffering, and perseverance unto death, so that we may also share their crowns of glory” Exposition of the Orthodox Faith

Called in the Gospel the Mother of Jesus, Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as the Mother of my Lord (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son,  the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos).
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart ... From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque
On Friday during Holy Communion, He said these words to me, His unworthy slave, if I mistake not:
I promise you in the excessive mercy of my Heart that its all-powerful love will grant to all those who receive Holy Communion on nine first Fridays of consecutive months the grace of final repentance; they will not die under my displeasure or without receiving their sacraments, my divine Heart making itself their assured refuge at the last moment.
Margaret Mary was inspired by Christ to establish the Holy Hour and to pray lying prostrate with her face to the ground from eleven till midnight on the eve of the first Friday of each month, to share in the mortal sadness.
He endured when abandoned by His Apostles in His Agony, and to receive holy Communion on the first Friday of every month. In the first great revelation, He made known to her His ardent desire to be loved by men and His design of manifesting His Heart with all Its treasures of love and mercy, of sanctification and salvation.
He appointed the Friday after the octave of the feast of Corpus Christi as the feast of the Sacred Heart; He called her the Beloved Disciple of the Sacred Heart, and the heiress of all Its treasures. The love of the Sacred Heart was the fire which consumed her, and devotion to the Sacred Heart is the refrain of all her writings. In her last illness she refused all alleviation, repeating frequently: What have I in heaven and what do I desire on earth, but Thee alone, O my God, and died pronouncing the Holy Name of Jesus.
With regard to this promise it may be remarked: (1) that our Lord required Communion to be received on a particular day chosen by Him; (2) that the nine Fridays must be consecutive; (3) that they must be made in honor of His Sacred Heart, which means that those who make the nine Fridays must practice the devotion and must have a great love for our Lord; (4) that our Lord does not say that those who make the nine Fridays will be dispensed from any of their obligations or from exercising the vigilance necessary to lead a good life and overcome temptation; rather He implicitly promises abundant graces to those who make the nine Fridays to help them to carry out these obligations and persevere to the end; (5) that perseverance in receiving Holy Communion for nine consecutive First Firdays helps the faithful to acquire the habit of frequent Communion, which our Lord eagerly desires; and (6) that the practice of the nine Fridays is very pleasing to our Lord He promises such great reward, and all Catholics should endeavor to make nine Fridays.
How do I start the Five First Saturdays? by Fr. Tom O'Mahony.
On July 13,1917, Our Lady appeared for the third time to the three children of Fatima an showed them the vision of hell and made the now - famous thirteen prophecies. In this vision Our Lady said that 'GOD WISHES TO ESTABLISH IN THE WORLD DEVOTION to Her Immaculate Heart and that She would come TO ASK FOR THE COMMUNION OF REPARATION ON THE FIRST SATURDAYS...'  Eight years later, on December 10, 1925, Our Lady did indeed come back. She appeared (with the Child Jesus) to Lucia in the convent of the Dorothean Sisters in Pontevedra.
The Child Jesus spoke first:
'HAVE COMPASSION ON THE HEART OF YOUR MOST HOLY MOTHER WHICH IS COVERED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT, WHILE THERE IS NO ONE TO REMOVE THEM WITH AN ACT OF REPARATION.'

THE GREAT PROMISE
Our Lady then said: 'MY DAUGHTER LOOK AT MY HEART SURROUNDED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT BY THEIR BLASPHEMIES AND INGRATITUDE. YOU, AT LEAST, TRY TO CONSOLE ME, AND SAY THAT I PROMISE TO ASSIST AT THE HOUR OF DEATH WITH ALL THE GRACES NECESSARY FOR SALVATION, ALL THOSE WHO, ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS GO TO CONFESSION AND RECEIVE HOLY COMMUNION, RECITE FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY AND KEEP ME COMPANY FOR A QUARTER OF AN HOUR WHILE MEDITATING ON MYSTERIES OF THE ROSARY, WITH THE INTENTION OF MAKING REPARATION TO ME.'

The Five Reasons
Lucia once asked this question of Our Lord and received as an answer: 'MY DAUGHTER, THE MOTIVE IS SIMPLE, THERE ARE FIVE KINDS OF OFFENCES AND BLASPHEMIES UTTERED AGAINST THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY: (1) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION: (2) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER VIRGINITY: (3) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER DIVINE MATERNITY: (4) BLASPHEMIES OF THOSE WHO OPENLY SEEK TO FOSTER IN THE HEARTS OF CHILDREN INDIFFERENCE OR EVEN HATRED FOR THIS IMMACULATE MOTHER: (5) THE OFFENCES OF THOSE WHO DIRECTLY OUTRAGE HER IN HOLY IMAGES.'
From the above, it is easy to see that each of the Five Saturdays can correspond to a specific offence. By offering the graces received during each First Saturday as reparation for the offence being prayed for, the participant can hope to help remove the thorns from Our Lady's Heart.
What Do I Have To Do?
The devotion of First Saturdays, as requested by Our Lady of Fatima, carries with it the assurance of salvation. However, to derive profit from such a great promise of Our Lady, the devotion must be properly understood and duly performed.
The requirements as stipulated by Our Lady are as follows:
(1) CONFESSION, (2) COMMUNION, (3) FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY, (4) MEDITATION ON ONE OR MORE OF THE ROSARY MYSTERIES FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES, (5) TO DO ALL THESE THINGS IN THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION TO THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY, and (6) TO OBSERVE ALL THESE PRACTICES ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS.
(1) CONFESSION: A reparative confession means that the confession should not only be good (valid and licit), but also be offered in the spirit of reparation, in this case, to Mary's Immaculate Heart. This confession may be made on the First Saturday itself or some days before or after the First Saturday within the preceding octave would suffice.
(2) COMMUNION: The communion of reparation must be sacramental duly received with the intention of making reparation. This offering, like the confession, is an interior act and so no external action to express the intention is needed.
(3) THE ROSARY: The Rosary mentioned here was indicated by the Portuguese word 'terco' which is commonly employed to denote a Rosary of five decades, since it forms a fourth of the full Rosary of 20 decades. This too must recited in a spirit of reparation.
(4) MEDITATION FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES: Here the meditation on one mystery or more is to be made without simultaneous recitation of the Rosary decade. As indicated, the meditation may be either on one mystery alone for 15 minutes, or on all 20 mysteries, spending about one minute on each mystery, or again, on two or more mysteries during the period. This can also be made before each decade spending three minutes or more in considering the mystery of the particular decade. This meditation has likewise to be made in the spirit of reparation to the Immaculate Heart.
(5) THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION: All these acts, as said above, have to be done with the intention of offering reparation to the Immaculate Heart of Mary for the offences committed against Her. Everyone who offends Her commits, so to speak, a two-fold offence, for these sins also offend her Divine Son, Christ, and so endanger our salvation. They give bad example to others and weaken the strength of society to withstand immoral onslaughts. Such devotions therefore make us consider not only the enormity of the offence against God, but also the effect of sins on human society as well as the need for undoing these social effects even when the offender repents and is converted. Further, this reparation emphasises our responsibility towards sinners who, themselves, will not pray and make reparation for their sins.
(6) FIVE CONSECUTIVE FIRST SATURDAYS: The idea of the Five First Saturdays is obviously to make us persevere in the devotional acts for these Saturdays and overcome initial difficulties. Once this is done, Our Lady knows that the person would become devoted to Her immaculate Heart and persist in practising such devotion on all First Saturdays, working thereby for personal self-reform and for the salvation of others.

Unless Russia is converted, the movement against God and for sin will continue to spread, promoting wars and persecutions, and making the attainment for peace and justice impossible for this world. One means of obtaining Russia's conversion is to practise the Fatima Message. The stakes are so great that to encourage Catholics to practise the devotion of the First Saturdays, Our Lady has assured us that She will obtain salvation for all those who observe the first Saturdays for five consecutive months in accordance with Her conditions.
At the supreme moment the departing person will be either in the state of grace or not. In either case Our Lady will be by his side. If in the state of grace, She will console and help him to resist whatever temptations the devil might put before him in his last attempt to take the person with him to hell. If not in the state of grace, Our Lady will help the person to repent in a manner agreeable to God and so benefit by the fruits of redemption and be saved.

God loves variety. He doesn't mass-produce his saints. Every saint is unique, for each is the result of a new idea.  As the liturgy says: Non est inventus similis illis--there are no two exactly alike. It is we with our lack of imagination, who paint the same haloes on all the saints. Dear Lord, grant us a spirit that is not bound by our own ideas and preferences.  Grant that we may be able to appreciate in others what we lack in ourselves. O Lord, grant that we may understand that every saint must be a unique praise of Your glory. Catholic saints are holy people and human people who lived extraordinary lives.  Each saint the Church honors responded to God's invitation to use his or her unique gifts.   God calls each one of us to be a saint in order to get into heavenonly saints are allowed into heaven. The more "extravagant" graces are bestowed NOT for the benefit of the recipients so much as FOR the benefit of others.
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

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Pius IX 1846--1878 • Leo XIII 1878-1903 • Pius X 1903-1914• Benedict XV 1914-1922 • Pius XI 1922-1939 • Pius XII 1939-1958 • John XXIII 1958-1963 • Paul VI 1963 to 1978 • John Paul • John Paul II 10/16/1975-4/2/2005 Benedict XVI (2005 - 2013) Francis (2013

Pope St. Clement (92-101):  Since all things lie open to His eyes and ears, let us hold Him in awe and rid ourselves of impure desires to do works of evil, so that we may be protected by His mercy from the judgement that is to come.
Which of us can escape His mighty hand? 

"The answers to many of life's questions can be found by reading the Lives of the Saints. They teach us how to overcome obstacles and difficulties, how to stand firm in our faith, and how to struggle against evil and emerge victorious."  1913 Saint Barsanuphius of Optina
The more "extravagant" graces are bestowed NOT for the benefit of the recipients so much as FOR benefit of others.
Non est inventus similis illis
God calls each one of us to be a saint in order to get into heaven.

Popes mentioned in articles of Saints today
November 1st - Queen of All Saints -November 1 - Queen of All Saints (608)
Our Lady of Folgoët
Salaün was such a simpleton that his contemporaries of the 15th century considered him a madman.
He could only say two words: “Ave Maria
(Hail Mary) and he repeated those two words over and over.
One year on November 1, Salaün was found dead near a tree trunk, by the edge of the woods, at the far end of the parish of Guic-Elleau in France and the townspeople buried him immediately on the spot. Later, a beautifully smelling lily grew up from his grave, with this inscription on it written in gold letters, the only two words he had pronounced all his life: Ave Maria.
In 1365, the first stone was laid for a church that is now the jewel of all the churches of Brittany: Notre-Dame de Folgoët (Our Lady of the Madman of the Woods).
The statue of Our Lady was crowned by the Church in 1888.

Eugenio Pacelli Proclaims the Dogma of the Assumption (1950)
A divinely revealed dogma
“After we have poured forth prayers of supplication again and again to God, and have invoked the light of the Spirit of Truth, for the glory of Almighty God who has lavished his special affection upon the Virgin Mary, for the honor of her Son, the immortal King of the Ages and the Victor over sin and death, for the increase of the glory of that same august Mother, and for the joy and exultation of the entire Church; by the authority of our Lord Jesus Christ, of the Blessed Apostles Peter and Paul, and by our own authority, we pronounce, declare, and define it to be a divinely revealed dogma: that the Immaculate Mother of God, the ever Virgin Mary, having completed the course of her earthly life, was assumed body and soul into heavenly glory. Hence if anyone, which God forbid, should dare wilfully to deny or to call into doubt that which we have defined, let him know that he has fallen away completely from the divine and Catholic Faith.”
After the Pope proclaimed this Dogma, a ray of sunlight shined forth on Saint Peter’s Basilica.
Pius XII - Munificentissimus Deus - Defining the Dogma of the Assumption, 1 November 1950

Festívitas ómnium Sanctórum, quam in honórem beátæ Dei Genitrícis Vírginis Maríæ et sanctórum Mártyrum Bonifátius Papa Quartus, cum templum Pántheon tértio Idus Maji dedicásset, célebrem et generálem instítuit agi quotánnis in urbe Roma.  Sed Gregórius item Quartus póstmodum decrévit, eándem festivitátem, quæ váriis modis jam in divérsis Ecclésiis celebrabátur, in honórem ómnium Sanctórum solémniter hac die ab univérsa Ecclésia perpétuo observári.
    The Festival of All Saints, which Pope Boniface IV, after the dedication of the Pantheon, ordained to be kept generally and solemnly every year on the 13th of May, in the city of Rome, in honour of the blessed Virgin Mary, Mother of God, and of the holy martyrs.  It was afterwards decreed by Gregory IV that this feast, which was then celebrated in many dioceses, but at different times, should be on this day kept by the whole Church in honour of all the saints.
The air which we breathe, the bread which we eat, the heart which throbs in our bosoms, are not more necessary for man that he may live as a human being, than is prayer for the Christian that he may live as a Christian.-- St. John Eudes

Solemnity of All Saints 
“'Be holy as I am holy,' says the Lord. As Christians we are all called to holiness because we are His children. Every Christian should be a saint. Indeed, for a Christian to live in a state of sin is a monstrous contradiction”. --Curé d'Ars.

It has recently been claimed that the decline in the cult of saints and in pilgrimages to holy places is spiritually beneficial for Christians, so that their attention will be turned exclusively towards Jesus. There is, however, a danger to the faith in attempting to become too intellectual and sophisticated, and thereby becoming too cold, methodical, and rational.
In the face of the divine mysteries and matters that are beyond human comprehension our minds should be kept open.

“The saints are like so many little mirrors in which Jesus Christ sees Himself. In His apostles He sees His zeal and love for the salvation of souls; in the martyrs He sees His constancy, suffering, and painful death; in the hermits He sees His obscure and hidden life; in the virgins He sees His spotless purity; and in all the saints He sees His unbounded charity.
And when we honor the virtues of the saints, we are but worshipping the virtues of Jesus Christ...”
 --
John Baptiste Marie Vianney Curé d'Ars

We render God a worship of adoration and dependence with faith, hope, love, and a profound humbling of our souls before His supreme Majesty. We honor the saints with a feeling of respect and veneration for the favors God granted them, for the virtues they practiced, and for the glory with which God has crowned them in heaven. We commend ourselves to their prayers.
It is a most precious grace that God should have destined the saints to be our protectors and our friends. Saint Bernard said that the honor we give them is less a glory for them than a help to us, and that we may call upon them with full confidence because they know how greatly we are exposed to dangers on earth, for they remember the perils that they themselves had to face during their lifetimes. -- Curé d'Ars.

The friendship that binds us to all the saints, and which is encouraged and commemorated by the feast-days of the Church, is not the invention of a handful of bigots or a commercial stunt manufactured by merchants of religious medallions. The communion of saints answers a definite need, and insofar as we neglect any one of the forms of spiritual life we are cutting ourselves off from a source of divine grace and making ourselves just a little blinder than we are already.
We too can be saints and we must all strive to become so.
The saints were mortals like us, weak and subject to the passions, as we are. We have the same help, the same means of grace, the same sacraments, but we must be like them and renounce the pleasures of the world, shunning the evils of the world as much as we can and remaining faithful to grace. We must take the saints as our models or be damned, that we must live either for heaven or for hell. There is no middle way. --Saint John Vianney.

The Church has celebrated some feast in honor of the saints from the period of primitive Christianity. There is tentative evidence of the celebration to honor all the martyrs in the writings of Tertullian (died 223) and Gregory of Nyssa (died 395). It was definitely observed at the time of Saint Ephraem (died 373), who in the Nisibene Hymnus mentions a feast kept in honor of the martyrs of all the earth on May 13. It should be noted that on May 13, c. 609, Pope Saint Boniface IV dedicated the Pantheon of Rome in honor of our Lady and all martyrs--another instance of something pagan baptized by Christianity for a new purpose dedicated to God.
The Venerable Bede (673-735) says that the pope designed that the memory of all the saints might in future be honored in the place which had formerly been devoted to the worship, not of gods, but of demons.

By 411 as indicated in the Syriac Short Martyrology, throughout the Syrian Church the Friday in the Octave of Easter was celebrated as the feast of all the martyrs.
Chaldean Catholics still maintain Easter Friday in honor of the martyrs.

Since at least the time of Saint John Chrysostom (died 407 - - one of the Three Holy Hierarchs), the Byzantine churches have kept a feast of all the martyrs on the Sunday after Pentecost (Chrysostom, A panegyric of all the martyrs that have suffered throughout the world)
  Saint John Chrysostom.
We are not quite sure how November 1 came to be commemorated in honor of all the saints in the West. We do know that by AD 800, Blessed Alcuin of York  was in the habit of keeping the solemnitas sanctissima of All Saints on November 1, preceded by a three-day fast. His friend Bishop Arno of Salzburg had presided over a synod in Bavaria (Germany) which included that day in its list of holy days (Walsh).
Blessed Alcuin
Why has the Church included such a day in its calendar? To honor all the saints--known and unknown to us--reigning together in glory; to give thanks to God for the graces with which He crowns all the elect; to excite ourselves to humble imitation of their virtues; to implore the Divine Mercy through the help of these intercessors; and to repair any failures in not having properly honored God in His saints on their individual feast days.

Saint Bernard wrote:
  It is our interest to honor the memory of the saints, not theirs. Would you know how it is our interest? from the remembrance of them I feel, I confess, a triple vehement desire kindled in my breast--of their company, of their bliss, and of their intercession.
First, of their company. To think of the saints is in some measure to see them. Thus we are in part, and this the better part of ourselves, in the land of the living, provided our affection goes along with our thoughts or remembrance: yet not as they are. The saints are there present, and in their persons; we are there only in affection and desires. Ah! when shall we join our fathers? when shall we be made the fellow-citizens of the blessed spirits, of the patriarchs, prophets, apostles, martyrs, and virgins? when shall we be mixed in the choir of the saints?
The remembrance of each one among the saints is, as it were, a new spark, or rather torch, which sets our souls more vehemently on fire, and makes us ardently sigh to behold and embrace them, so that we seem to ourselves even now to be amongst them. And from this distant place of banishment we dart our affections sometimes towards the whole assembly, sometimes towards this, and sometimes that happy spirit. What sloth is it that we do not launch our souls into the midst of those happy troops, and burst hence by continual sighs! The church of the first-born waits for us; yet we loiter. The saints earnestly long for our arrival; yet we despise them. Let us with all the ardor of our souls prevent those who are expecting us; let us hasten to those who are waiting for us.

Secondly, he mentions the desire of their bliss; and, lastly, the succor of their intercession, and adds:
 
Have pity on me, have pity on me, at least you, my friends. You know our danger, our frail mould, our ignorance, and the snares of our enemies; you know our weakness, and the fury of their assaults. For I speak to you who have been under the like temptation; who have overcome the like assaults; have escaped the like snares; and have learned compassion from what you yourselves have suffered.--We are members of the same Head.--Your glory is not to be consummated without us...
Bernard of Clairvaux, Serm. 5 de fest. omnium sanct., n. 5, 6.

In his sermon on the Vigil of Saints Peter and Paul, Bernard also writes: He who was powerful on earth is more powerful in heaven, where he stands before the face of his Lord. And if he had compassion on sinners, and prayed for them while he lived on earth, he now prays to the Father for us so much the more earnestly as he more truly knows our extreme necessities and miseries; his blessed country has not changed, but increased his charity. Though now impassible, he is not a stranger to compassion: by standing before the throne of mercy, he has put on the tender bowels of mercy...
     
November 1st - All Saints Day - OUR LADY OF THE PALM (1755, Cadiz, Spain)
Mary and the Souls in Purgatory (I): What is Purgatory?
The Holy Church of God, considered in its totality, is composed of three parts: the Church militant, the Church triumphant, and the Church suffering, or purgatory. This triple Church constitutes the mystical body of Jesus Christ, and the souls in purgatory are no less her members than the faithful on earth and the elect in heaven.
In the Gospel, the Church is ordinarily called the Kingdom of God; purgatory, just like heaven and the Church on earth, is a province of that vast Kingdom. The three sister-Churches have between them an incessant exchange, a continual communication, called the Communion of Saints. These relationships have no other object than to lead souls to glory, the final term toward which all the elect tend.
The word purgatory means sometimes a place, sometimes a state half-way between hell and heaven. It is, properly speaking, the situation of the souls who, at the time of death, find themselves in a state of grace, but haven't completely expiated their faults or attained the degree of purity necessary to enjoy the vision of God.
Purgatory is therefore a temporary state, which ends in the beatific life.
The Church teaches two things about purgatory, truths that are clearly defined as dogmas of faith: first, that there is a purgatory; secondly, that the souls in purgatory can be helped by the petitions of the faithful, especially by the holy sacrifice of the Mass.
Rev. Fr. François-Xavier Schouppe, s.j. The Dogma of Purgatory Illustrated by Facts and Private Revelations

Catholic saints are holy people and human people who lived extraordinary lives.
Each saint the Church honors responded to God's invitation to use his or her unique gifts.
God calls each one of us to be a saint.
The more "extravagant" graces are bestowed not for the benefit of the recipients so much as for the benefit of others.

November 1, 2006 Feast of All Saints  
The earliest certain observance of a feast in honor of all the saints is an early fourth-century commemoration of “all the martyrs. In the early seventh century, after successive waves of invaders plundered the catacombs, Pope Boniface IV gathered up some 28 wagonloads of bones and reinterred them beneath the Pantheon, a Roman temple dedicated to all the gods. The pope rededicated the shrine as a Christian church. According to Venerable Bede, the pope intended that the memory of all the saints might in the future be honored in the place which had formerly been dedicated to the worship not of gods but of demons. (On the Calculation of Time).
But the rededication of the Pantheon, like the earlier commemoration of all the martyrs, occurred in May. Many Eastern Churches still honor all the saints in the spring, either during the Easter season or immediately after Pentecost.

How the Western Church came to celebrate this feast in November is a puzzle to historians. The Anglo-Saxon theologian Alcuin observed the feast on November 1 in 800, as did his friend Arno, Bishop of Salzburg. Rome finally adopted that date in the ninth century.
Comment: This feast first honored martyrs. Later, when Christians were free to worship according to their conscience, the Church acknowledged other paths to sanctity. In the early centuries the only criterion was popular acclaim, even when the bishop's approval became the final step in placing a commemoration on the calendar. The first papal canonization occurred in 993; the lengthy process now required to prove extraordinary sanctity took form in the last 500 years. Today's feast honors the obscure as well as the famous—the saints each of us have known.
Quote: “After this I had a vision of a great multitude, which no one could count, from every nation, race, people, and tongue. They stood before the throne and before the Lamb, wearing white robes and holding palm branches in their hands.... [One of the elders] said to me, ‘These are the ones who have survived the time of great distress; they have washed their robes and made them white in the blood of the Lamb’” (Revelation 7:9,14).

November 1 - Queen of All Saints (608)
Our Lady of Folgoët

Salaün was such a simpleton that his contemporaries of the 15th century considered him a madman. He could only say two words: "Ave Maria" (Hail Mary) and he repeated those two words over and over.

One year on November 1, Salaün was found dead near a tree trunk, by the edge of the woods, at the far end of the parish of Guic-Elleau in France and the townspeople buried him immediately on the spot. Later, a beautifully smelling lily grew up from his grave, with this inscription on it written in gold letters, the only two words he had pronounced all his life: "Ave Maria."

In 1365, the first stone was laid for a church that is now the jewel of all the churches of Brittany: Notre-Dame de Folgoët (Our Lady of the Madman of the Woods). The statue of Our Lady was crowned by the Church in 1888?


November 1 - All Saints  As the world returns to the love of Mary…
The term ‘Woman’ indicated a wider relationship to all humanity than ‘Mother.’ It meant that she (Mary) was to be not only his mother, but that she was also to be the mother of all mankind, as he was the Savior of all mankind. She was now to have many children—not according to the flesh, but according to the spirit. Jesus was her firstborn in the flesh in joy; John was her second-born in the spirit of sorrow; and we are her millionth and millionth born.
(…)
Every objection against devotion to Mary grows in the soil of an imperfect belief in the Son. It is a historical fact that, as the world lost the Mother, it also lost the Son. It may be that, as the world returns to the love of Mary, it will also return to a belief in the divinity of Christ.

Venerable Fulton J. Sheen  American Bishop.
His cause for sainthood was opened in 2002

  John Paul II -- October 16 - The Purity of the Blessed Virgin Mary - John Paul II becomes Pope (1978)
Benedict_XVI_Patriarch_Bartholomew
"Christianity is not a moral code or a philosophy,
but an encounter with a person" -- Benedict XVI


1667-1669 Pope Clement IX;
elected to the papacy by the unanimous Sacred College vote; idol of the Romans erudition application to business, his extreme charity, affability towards great and small; 2 days/week occupied confessional in St. Peter's church heard any one who wished to confess; frequently visited hospitals, lavish in alms to the poor; he did little or nothing to advance or enrich his family; aversion to notoriety, refused to permit his name to be placed on the buildings erected during his reign; declared blessed, Rose of Lima, first American saint, solemnly canonized S. Maria Maddalena dei Pazzi and St. Peter of Alcantara; death of the beloved pontiff was long lamented by Romans, who considered him, if not the greatest, at least the most amiable of the popes.


Pope Leo XIII

The best way to make our pleas heard 
The Rosary, a kind of prayer that seems to contain, as it were, a final pledge of affection and to sum up in itself the honor due to Our Lady… There has seemed to be no better means of conducting sacred solemnities or of obtaining protection and favors. (Encyclical Octobri Mense).

There are, of course, more ways than one to win her protection by prayer, but as for Us, We think that the best and most effective way to her favor lies in the Rosary. (Encyclical Adjutricem populi, 1895).

So that our pleas have the greatest effect… let us has recourse to Mary… through the Rosary (1891).


Mrs Adjoubei’s Rosary        Bishop Roncalli, the future Pope John XXIII
As he left Bulgaria in 1934, Bishop Roncalli, the future Pope John XXIII, stated,
"If a Slavic, catholic or not, knocks on my door, it will be opened and he will be greeted like a true friend." Later, a Slavic arrived one day at the airport of Fiumicino who asked to see Pope John XXIII. His reply was immediate, "Let him come!"
The meeting was set for March 7th.

After the general audience, the Pope called for Mr. Adjoubei and his wife, Rada, a young woman from Khrushchev. He received them in his library and asked them to be seated.
They spoke about many things including the Saints of Russia and the beauty of Orthodox liturgy.

Then John XXIII picked up a string of rosary beads that was laid on his table.
"Madam, this is for you. My entourage taught me that I should give currencies or stamps to a non-Catholic princess; but I still give you a Rosary because priests, in addition to the biblical prayer of the psalms, also have this popular form of prayer. For me, the Pope, it is like fifteen open windows - fifteen mysteries - through which I contemplate, in the light of the Lord, the events of the world. I say a rosary in the morning, another at the beginning of the afternoon, and another in the evening.
Look, I made a great impression by telling the journalists that in the fifth joyful mystery - "he listened and questioned them" - I was really praying for... I made an impression on those people when I said that, in the third joyful mystery - the Birth of Jesus - I prayed for all the babies who are born in the past twenty-four hours, because, Catholics or not, they will find the wishes of the Pope upon their entry into life.
When I recite the third mystery, I will also remember your children, Madam."

Mrs Adjoubei, who held the Rosary in her hands, answered,
"Thank you, Holy Father, how grateful I am to you! I will tell my children what you said...

" The Pope looked at her smiling, "I know the name of your sons... the third is called Yan, or John like me...
When you are back home, give him a special hug from me... " 
Rosary for the Church, #14 - 1973

Cross Not Optional, Says Benedict XVI
Reflects on Peter's "Immature" Faith CASTEL GANDOLFO, Italy, AUG. 31, 2008 (Zenit.org).- Taking up one's cross isn't an option, it's a mission all Christians are called to, says Benedict XVI.
APOSTLES: COLLABORATORS IN TRUE JOY
VATICAN CITY, 10 SEP 2008 (VIS) - At his general audience this morning, celebrated in the Paul VI Hall, the Pope dedicated his catechesis to St. Paul's view of the meaning of apostolate.
  The Pauline concept of apostleship went "beyond that of the group of Twelve" explained the Holy Father. "It was characterised by three elements: the first was the fact of having seen the Lord, in other words of having encountered Him in a way that marked his life. ... Definitively then, it is the Lord Who confers the apostolate, not individual presumption. Apostles do not make themselves but are created so by the Lord".
  The second characteristic is that of "having been sent. In fact, the Greek term 'apostolos' means envoy, ... the representative of a principal. ... Once again the idea emerges of an initiative arising from someone else, from God in Jesus Christ, to Whom one is duty-bound", of "a mission to be accomplished in His name, putting all personal interests aside".
  "Announcing the Gospel and the consequent founding of Churches" is the third requisite. "The tile of apostle", said Pope Benedict, "is not and cannot be a merely honorary title. It truly, even dramatically, involves the entire existence of the person concerned".
  St. Paul also defined apostles as "servants of God, Whose grace acts in them", said the Pope. "A typical element of the true apostle ... is a form of identification between the Gospel and the evangeliser, both share the same destiny. Indeed no-one so much as Paul highlighted how announcing the cross of Christ is a 'stumbling block and foolishness' to which many react with misunderstanding and refusal. That happened then and it should be no surprise that the same thing happens today".
  "With the stoical philosophy of his time, Paul shared the idea of tenacious perseverance in all the difficulties he had to face; but he went beyond the merely human perspective by recalling ... God's love and Christ's. ... This is the certainty, the profound joy that guided the Apostle though all those events: nothing can separate us from the love of God, and this love is the real treasure of human life".
  "As we may see, St. Paul gave himself to the Gospel with all his life", said the Holy Father in conclusion. "He undertook his ministry with faithfulness and joy that he 'might by all means save some'. And though aware of his own relationship of paternity - even, indeed, of maternity - towards the Churches, his attitude to them was one of complete service, declaring: "I do not mean to imply that we lord it over your faith; rather, we are workers with you for your joy'. This remains the mission of all the apostles of Christ in all times: to be collaborators of true joy".
AG/ST. PAUL/...VIS 080910 (480)

JOHN PAUL I  ANGELUS  Sunday, 10 September 1978
At Camp David, in America, Presidents Carter and Sadat and Prime Minister Begin are working for peace in the Middle East. All men are hungry and thirsty for peace, especially the poor, who pay more and suffer more in troubled times and in wars; for this reason they look to the Camp David meeting with interest and great hope. The Pope, too, has prayed, had prayers said, and is praying the Lord may deign to help the efforts of these politicians.

I was very favourably impressed by the fact that the three Presidents wished to express their hope in the Lord publicly in prayer. President Sadat's brothers in religion are accustomed to say as follows:
 "there is pitch darkness, a black stone and on the stone a little ant; but God sees it, and does not forget it".
President Carter, who is a fervent Christian, reads in the Gospel;
 "Knock, and it will be opened to you; ask, and it will be given you. Even the hairs of your head are all numbered."
And Premier Begin recalls that the Jewish people once passed difficult moments and addressed the Lord complaining and saying:
 "You have forsaken us, you have forgotten us!" "No!"—He replied through Isaiah the Prophet—"can a mother forget her own child? But even if it should happen, God will never forget his people".

Also we who are here have the same sentiments; we are the objects of undying love on the part of God. We know: he has always his eyes open on us, even when it seems to be dark. He is our father; even more he is our mother. He does not want to hurt us, He wants only to do good to us, to all of us.  If children are ill, they have additional claim to be loved by their mother. And we too, if by chance we are sick with badness, on the wrong track, have yet another claim to be loved by the Lord.

With these sentiments I invite you to pray together with the Pope for each of us, for the Middle East, for Iran, and for the whole world.  © Copyright 1978 - Libreria Editrice Vaticana