Mary the Mother of Jesus
40 Days for Life   Day 1
0ur_Lady_of_Ransom
Thursday Saints of  September 24 Octávo Kaléndas Octóbris  
 Et álibi aliórum plurimórum sanctórum
Mártyrum et Confessórum, atque sanctárum Vírginum.
And elsewhere in divers places,
many other holy martyrs, confessors, and holy virgins.

Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас! 
(Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)


Six Canonized on Feast of Christ the King Nov 23 2014

CAUSES OF SAINTS

Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List  Here

Acts of the Apostles

Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

How do I start the Five First Saturdays?

Mary Mother of GOD 15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

Acts of the Apostles

40 Days for Life   Day 2 intention
That we may use these 40 Days for Life to plead for God's mercy and grace upon all those involved in the sin of abortion.
Day 2 intention Dear readers,
Like many people, I was first inspired to get involved in the pro-life movement because of courageous leadership from the clergy. Countless pastors from many churches have helped spread 40 Days for Life … and they all need our prayers as they proclaim the Word of God in a hostile world. 
Prominent Evangelical, Catholic and Protestant leaders have endorsed 40 Days for Life and encouraged the faithful to defend God's most vulnerable among us. You can see these leaders – and their words of endorsement – at: https://40daysforlife.com/endorsements

One of those leaders is dominating the media this week, and he will be visiting three major cities where 40 Days for Life vigils are taking place – Pope Francis!  Pope Francis has supported 40 Days for Life around the globe and was able to meet our international outreach director, Robert Colquhoun, in Rome. As Pope Francis visits the United States, local 40 Days for Life leaders are reaching out to those traveling to Washington, New York and Philadelphia. One leader said, “If people are coming to town to see the pope, they’re also invited to come pray at our vigil!”  No matter where you live, you can find your closest campaign location here: https://40daysforlife.com/browse-campaigns/ 

Today’s update starts with a report from Robert, who’s visiting team leaders and volunteers in Slovenia … and ends with prayer for all of our shepherds.

Ljubljana, Slovenia
Slovenia is hosting its second 40 Days for Life campaign. Matjaz Venta, the local leader, has a very deep faith and is passionate about prayer and the pro-life cause. Abortion was legalized during the communist era. Although communism came to an end 25 years ago, it still pervades the country’s mentality. There are 4,000 abortions a year among the two million population. Their prayer vigil is outside the local hospital, where abortions are performed in three different locations inside. Nada, one of the volunteers, tells me they received spiteful responses from some members of the public following their first campaign, although there were positive comments too. Around the corner, we prayed in a church which was confiscated by the communists and turned into a film studio. Also during that era, abortions were performed in the Jesuit house. The abortion room is now a chapel. It is a telling story of the spiritual journey of the country.
I look forward to what God has in store for Slovenia! Thanks to Robert Colquhoun for this update from Ljubljana.

White Plains, New York
This 40 Days for Life campaign kicked off with a rally in front of Planned Parenthood – a building featuring a big pink banner with the words, “health care happens here.” Gerald Yeung, the local leader, told the group that God is always doing something good – and it often involves 40 Days for Life. Fr. Thomas Kallumady, pastor of St. John the Evangelist / Our Lady of Mt. Carmel Parish, thanked the attendees for witnessing to their faith and their “love for the unborn and the living.”  Maria Teresa Rueda prayed in Spanish for God's protection over the unborn and their parents. Sister Shirley Ann of the Sisters of Life prayed that God's mercy, grace and strength would “overtake every woman that comes to this Planned Parenthood.”
 
Today’s devotional is from Rev. Clenard Childress of  Life Education and Resources Network.
Day 2 intention
Let us pray that pastors may not be distracted from the priority of caring for human lives.
Scripture
In those days, when the number of the disciples was multiplying, there arose a complaint against the Hebrews by the Hellenists, because their widows were neglected in the daily distribution. — Acts 6:1

Reflection by Rev. Clenard Childress
More folks learning left some yearning.
It is the dawning of a new day. There is much excitement in Jerusalem. Many who dedicated themselves to the faith became disciples (the word disciple means learner). The unprecedented church growth was miraculous and undoubtedly brought much satisfaction to the new leadership. The apostles, however, were about to experience growing pains in their master plan of evangelism.

Projects that engage the community, especially those that are evangelistic in nature, are high on the list of priorities for every duty-bound pastor.
Church attendance is a constant concern for every pastor and often his or her worth is measured by it. Unfortunately, just as the original twelve pastors in Acts, they can be so focused on getting people in that they inadvertently end up pushing some people out. Murmuring is a deplorable deterrent to a harmonious fellowship, yet God used it to get the disciples attention. Those that needed daily attention due to their age and social status were being neglected. This neglect of the Hellenist widows during the daily distribution of food was causing undue grief and needed to be corrected by the leadership. By God’s grace the problem was dealt with, but the lesson remains. And during these 40 days, let us pray that today's church not make the same mistake of forgetting the contributions of our seniors, or the needs of the weakest among us, the unborn.

Prayer
Father, in the Church’s desire to engage our communities with the Gospel let her not disengage from those who need their care and company the most.
Let us gain wisdom from those who have gone before us and cherish their experiences and perspectives. Help us to appreciate every soul in the body of Christ and minister properly to everybody. Amen.

Printable devotional
To download today’s devotional as a formatted, printable PDF to share:
http://40daysforlife.com/media/day02.pdf

September 24 –– Cozumel, the first Marian shrine in Haiti (1518) 
 Our Lady of Mercy – Our Lady of Walsingham (England)

 
Ties between the Haitian people and the Virgin Mary stronger than ever
 Haiti is a country of the Greater Antilles occupying the western third of the island of Hispaniola with Port-au-Prince as its capital.
It was in the Antilles, on the island Hispaniola, today shared between two independent countries, the Dominican Republic and Haiti, that Christopher Columbus landed on October 12, 1492, when he discovered America.  Evangelization and Marian devotion spread from Hispaniola, the land of the first European colonies in the Americas. Of Haiti's five cathedrals, four are dedicated to the Blessed Virgin and originate more or less directly from that first period of European presence on the island.
In the rest of the country, numerous parishes have the Virgin as their patroness, under various titles,
depending on the special feelings of the clergy or the faithful.  Since 1882, when the great smallpox epidemic broke out, until the consecration of the nation in 1942 during the Second World War, ties have grown even stronger between the Haitian people and the Virgin Mary under the title of our Lady of Perpetual Help.

15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

1st v.  St. Anathalon Bishop Milan companion of St. Barnabas
1st v. Thekla The Holy Protomartyr and Equal of the Apostles; after the preaching of holy Apostle Paul about the Savior, came to love the Lord Jesus Christ, and resolved not to enter into marriage, rather to devote all her life to preaching the Gospel.
2nd v. St. Andochius Priest martyr sent to Gaul by St. Polycarp
 303 St. Paphnutius martyr of Egypt
 394 49 Martyrs of Chalcedon;  members of the choir in the church of Chalcedon
 446 St. Rusticus present also at the Council of Arles
 658 St Geremarus, Or Germer; Abbot
 675 St. Chuniald & Gislar missionaries to Germany Austria
 733 St. Bercthun Benedictine abbot disciple of St. John of Beverley
1046 St. Gerard, bishop of Chzonad and martyr, patrician of Venice, called the apostle of the Hungarians
1048 St. Ysarn Benedictine abbot native of Toulouse
          Feast of Our Lady of Ransom
1218  Bd Robert Of Knaresborough; Like his fellow hermit and fellow Yorkshireman Richard Rolle, Robert Flower, the  Holy Hermit of Knaresborough", enjoyed a considerable cultus in medieval England which was never confirmed or made public by canonization. His name has not been found in calendars, but the Trinitarian church at Knaresborough was called St Robert's, and Matthew Paris mentions him with St Edmund of Abingdon and St Elizabeth of Hungary as one of the holiest persons of his time.
1721 ST PACIFICO OF SAN SEVERINO At Mass he was often rapt in ecstasy; gift of prophecy ability to read the consciences of his penitents Miracles took place at his tomb, as they had done in his lifetime; "Moreover, I advise and admonish the friars that in their preaching, their words should be examined and chaste. They should aim only at the advantage and spiritual good of their listeners, telling them briefly about vice and virtue, punishment and glory, because our Lord himself kept his words short on earth" (St. Francis, Rule of 1223, Ch. 9).
1794 arrival of Russian missionaries in Alaska, On the anniversary of the the  we remember the New Martyrs St Peter the Aleut, Protomartyr of America, and
Saint Juvenal, the Protomartyr of America, was born in 1761 in Nerchinsk, Siberia. His secular name was John Feodorovich Hovorukhin, and he was trained as a mining engineer. In a letter to Abbot Nazarius of Valaam (December 13, 1819), St Herman says St Juvenal "had been an assistant at our monastery and was a former officer."

Feast of Our Lady of Walsingham A Pro-Life Feast
Feast of Our Lady of Walsingham  Walsingham, England’s Nazareth

In the year 2000, the Holy Father John Paul II decreed that the feast of Our Lady of Walsingham, mediaeval patroness of England, and in modern time patroness of all English-speaking peoples, was to be celebrated on September 24th instead of March 25th.

The feast of Our Lady of Walsingham was celebrated for the first time on the new date in 2001. The feast of the Annunciation is increasingly celebrated as a pro-life feast, to call attention to the unborn; Our Lady of Walsingham's feast asks us to contemplate the joy of the Incarnation in the simple family life of the Holy Family at Nazareth. The new date and emphasis on this feast is timely considering how family life is under attack in Western culture.

It was in the year 1061, in the little village of Walsingham, that Our Lady appeared to a widow, Richeldis de Faverches. It is said that she appeared three times in a vision and each time showed to Richeldis the house in which the Holy Family had dwelt in Nazareth.

Mary requested that Richeldis build a replica of this house in Walsingham. Our Lady said: "Do all this unto my special praise and honor. And all who are in any way distressed or in need, let them seek me here in that little house you have made at Walsingham. To all that seek me there shall be given succor. And there at Walsingham in this little house shall be held in remembrance the great joy of my salutation when Saint Gabriel told me I should through humility become the mother of God's Son."  
Adapted from http://www.wf-f.org/OLWalsingham.html
See Claude Fisher, Walsingham Lives On, London: Catholic Truth Society.

Saint Mary of Mercy  September 24 - OUR LADY OF MERCY

The Blessed Virgin Mary is said to have been the inspiration for the founding of the Order of Mercy by Saint Peter Nolasco (1180 - 1245). Peter was born near Toulouse in c.1180. During his teens, his family moved to Barcelona, Spain. The first evidence of his presence in Barcelona dates from 1203, when, deeply saddened by the miserable living conditions of the enslaved Christians, at the mercy of the Moors who ruled a large part of Spain at the time, he became a merchant in order to travel more easily to occupied territory and buy the release of 300 with his hard-earned money.

Once his personal fortune spent, he joined other noble and generous young people who worked to free whole groups of slaves. Despite their efforts, they saw the number of slaves increase. Their situation, once they were transported to Arab countries, became more and more a concern for Peter and his companions,
who for fifteen years had freed thousands of Christians.

Peter, at that point, thought of retiring from the world to lead a contemplative life, feeling utterly unable to improve the situation. During one of his nights of prayer, on August 1, 1218, the Virgin Mary inspired him, by specially enlightening his intelligence, to found a religious order dedicated to works of mercy,
particularly in order to redeem slaves, even at the price of their lives.

After he spoke to the young king of Aragon, James I, and his bishop, Bishop Berenguer of Barcelona, on August 10, 1218, Peter Nolasco officially constituted the new religious order at the Cathedral of the Holy Cross, taking for the rule of Saint Augustine. The bishop gave the young men a tunic of white wool as a garment
 in homage to the immaculate purity of the Blessed Virgin Mary.
Adapted from Antonio Borrelli  www.santiebeati.it/dettaglio/71800
September 24 - Feast of Our Lady of Walsingham  Walsingham, England’s Nazareth  
In AD 2000, the Holy Father John Paul II decreed that the feast of Our Lady of Walsingham, mediaeval patroness of England, and in modern times patroness of all English-speaking peoples, is now celebrated on September 24th instead of March 25th.
    It was in the year 1061, in the little village of Walsingham, that Our Lady appeared to a widow, Richeldis de Faverches. It is said that she appeared three times in a vision and each time showed to Richeldis the house in which the Holy Family had dwelt in Nazareth.

Mary requested that Richeldis build a replica of this house in Walsingham. Our Lady said,
  "Do all this unto my special praise and honor. And all who are in any way distressed or in need, let them seek me here in that little house you have made at Walsingham. To all that seek me there shall be given succor. And there at Walsingham in this little house shall be held in remembrance the great joy of my salutation when Saint Gabriel told me I should through humility become the Mother of God's Son."

The feast of Our Lady of Walsingham was celebrated for the first time on the new date in 2001. The feast of the Annunciation is increasingly celebrated as a pro-life feast, considering children in the womb; Our Lady of Walsingham's feast asks us to contemplate the joy of the Incarnation in the simple family life of the Holy Family at Nazareth. The new date and emphasis on this feast is timely considering how family life is under attack in Western culture.
Adapted from http://www.wf-f.org/OLWalsingham.html  See Claude Fisher, Walsingham Lives On, London: Catholic Truth Society.
Festum beátæ Maríæ Vírginis de Mercede nuncupátæ, Ordinis redemptiónis captivórum sub ejus nómine Institutricis, de cujus Apparitióne agitur quarto Idus Augústi.
     The feast of our Lady of Ransom, Foundress of the Order for the Redemption of Captives.  The apparition of the same Blessed Virgin occurred on the 10th of August.

JOHN PAUL I  ANGELUS Sunday, 24 September 1978
Yesterday afternoon I went to St. John Lateran. Thanks to the Romans, to the kindness of the Mayor and some authorities of the Italian Government, it was a joyful moment for me.

On the contrary, it was not joyful but painful to learn from the newspapers a few days ago that a Roman student had been killed for a trivial reason, in cold blood. It is one of the many cases of violence which are continually afflicting this poor and restless society of ours.

The case of Luca Locci, a seven-year-old boy kidnapped three months ago, has come up again in the last few days. People sometimes say: "we are in a society that is all rotten, all dishonest." That is not true. There are still so many good people, so many honest people. Rather, what can be done to improve society? I would say: let each of us try to be good and to infect others with a goodness imbued with the meekness and love taught by Christ. Christ's golden rule was: "do not do to others what you do not want done to yourself. Do to others what you want done to yourself." 'And he always gave. Put on the cross, not only did he forgive those who crucified him, but he excused them. He said: "Father, forgive them for they know not what they do." This is Christianity, these are sentiments which, if put into practice would help society so much.

This year is the thirtieth anniversary of the death of Georges Bernanos, a great Catholic writer. One of his best-known works is "Dialogues of the Carmelites". It was published year after his death. He had prepared it working on a story of the German authoress, Gertrud von Le Fort. He had prepared it for the theatre.

It went on the stage. It was set to music and then shown on the screens of the whole world. It became extremely well known. The fact, however, was a historical one.
   Pius X, in 1906, right here in Rome, had beatified the sixteen Carmelites of Compiègne, martyrs during the French revolution. During the trial they were condemned "to death for fanaticism". And one of them asked in her simplicity:

 "Your Honour, what does fanaticism mean?" And the judge: "It is your foolish membership of religion." "Oh, Sisters, she then said, did you hear, we are condemned for our attachment to faith. What happiness to die for Jesus Christ!"


They were brought out of the prison of the Conciergerie, and made to climb into the fatal cart. On the way they sang hymns; when they reached the guillotine, one after the other knelt before the Prioress and renewed the vow of obedience. Then they struck up "Veni Creator"; the song, however, became weaker and weaker, as the heads of the poor Sisters fell, one by one, under the guillotine. The Prioress, Sister Theresa of St Augustine, was the last, and her last words were the following: "Love will always be victorious, love can do everything." That was the right word, not violence, but love, can do everything. Let us ask the Lord for the grace that a new wave of love for our neighbour may sweep over this poor world. © Copyright 1978 - Libreria Editrice Vaticana

"The answers to many of life's questions can be found by reading the Lives of the Saints. They teach us how to overcome obstacles and difficulties, how to stand firm in our faith, and how to struggle against evil and emerge victorious."  1913 Saint Barsanuphius of Optina
God calls each one of us to be a saint in order to get into heaven.
The more "extravagant" graces are bestowed NOT for the benefit of the recipients so much as FOR benefit of others.

With regard to doing the will of the Lord, even if someone should be scandalized by what we do,
we must not let that hamper our freedom of action.
-- St. Basil the Great.



1st century St. Anathalon Bishop Milan companion of St. Barnabas
Brixiæ deposítio sancti Anathalónis Epíscopi, qui, beáti Barnabæ Apóstoli discípulus, in ejus locum Epíscopus Ecclésiæ Mediolanénsis successit.
    At Brescia, the death of St. Anathalo, bishop.  He was a disciple of the blessed apostle Barnabas, and succeeded him as bishop of the Milanese church.
Anathalon was sent to Milan by Barnabas. He spent many years laboring in Milan and in nearby Brescia.
At Brescia, the death of St. Anathalo, Bishop; he was a disciple of the blessed Apostle Barnabas and succeeded him as bishop of the Church of Milan.

1st v. Thekla The Holy Protomartyr and Equal of the Apostles; after the preaching of holy Apostle Paul about the Savior, came to love the Lord Jesus Christ, and resolved not to enter into marriage, rather to devote all her life to preaching the Gospel.

Thekla was born in the city of Iconium daughter of rich and illustrious parents, and distinguished by extraordinary beauty. At eighteen they betrothed her to an eminent youth. But after she heard the preaching of the holy Apostle Paul about the Savior, St Thekla with all her heart came to love the Lord Jesus Christ, and she steadfastly resolved not to enter into marriage, but rather to devote all her life to preaching the Gospel.

St Thekla's mother was opposed to her daughter's plans and insisted that she marry her betrothed. St Thekla's fiancé also complained to the prefect of the city about the Apostle Paul, accusing him of turning his bride against him. The prefect locked up St Paul in prison.

During the night St Thekla secretly ran away from her house, and she bribed the prison guards, giving them all her gold ornaments, and so made her way into the prison to the prisoner. For three days she sat at the feet of the Apostle Paul, listening to his fatherly precepts. Thekla's disappearance was discovered, and servants were sent out everywhere looking for her. Finally, they found her in the prison and brought her home by force.

At his trial St Paul was sentenced to banishment from the city. Again they urged St Thekla to consent to the marriage, but she would not change her mind. Neither the tears of her mother, nor her wrath, nor the threats of the prefect could separate St Thekla from her love for the Heavenly Bridegroom, the Lord Jesus Christ.

Her mother in a insane rage demanded from the judges a death sentence against her unyielding daughter, and St Thekla was sentenced to be burned. Without flinching, the holy martyr went into the fire and made the Sign of the Cross over herself. At this moment the Savior appeared to her, blessing her present deed, and inexpressible joy filled her holy soul.

The flames of the fire shot up high, but the martyr was surrounded by a light and the flames did not touch her. Thunder boomed, and a strong downpour of rain and hail extinguished the fire. The torturers scattered in fear. St Thekla, kept safe by the Lord, left the city and with the help of a certain Christian youth, searched for the Apostle Paul. The holy apostle and his companions, among whom was St Barnabas, were hidden in a cave not far from the city, praying fervently, that the Lord would strengthen St Thekla in her sufferings.

After this, St Thekla went with them preaching the Gospel in Antioch. In this city she was pursued by a certain dignitary named Alexander, who was captivated by her beauty. St Thekla refused his offer of marriage, and so she was condemned to death for being a Christian. Twice they set loose hungry wild animals upon her, but they would not touch the holy virgin. Instead, they lay down meekly and licked her feet.

The Providence of God preserved the holy martyr unharmed through all her torments. Finally, they tied her to two oxen and began to chase her with red-hot rods, but the strong cords broke asunder like cobwebs, and the oxen ran off, leaving St Thekla unharmed. The people began shouting, "Great is the God of the Christians!" The prefect himself became terrified, realizing that the holy martyr was being kept safe by the Almighty God, Whom she served. He then gave orders to set free the servant of God Thekla.

With the blessing of the Apostle Paul, St Thekla then settled in a desolate region of Isaurian Seleucia and dwelt there for many years, constantly preaching the Word of God and healing the sick through her prayer. St Thekla converted many pagans to Christ, and the Church appropriately names her as "Equal- to-the-Apostles." Even a pagan priest, trying to assault her purity and punished for his impudence, was brought by her to holy Baptism. More than once the Enemy of the race of man tried to destroy St Thekla through people blinded by sin, but the power of God always preserved this faithful servant of Christ.

When St Thekla was already a ninety-year-old woman, pagan sorcerers became incensed at her for treating the sick for free. They were unable to comprehend that the saint was healing the sick by the power of the grace of Christ, and they presumed that the virgin-goddess Artemis was her special helper. Envious of St Thekla, they sent their followers to defile her. When they came near her, St Thekla cried out for help to Christ the Savior, and a rock split open and hid the holy virgin, the bride of Christ. Thus did St Thekla offer up her holy soul to the Lord.

The holy Church glorifies the Protomartyr Thekla as "the glory of women and guide for the suffering, opening up the way through every torment." From of old many churches were dedicated to her, one of which was built at Constantinople by the holy Equal of the Apostles Constantine (May 21). The Protomartyr Thekla, a prayerful intercessor for ascetics, is also invoked during the tonsure of women into monasticism.

2nd century St. Andochius Priest martyr sent to Gaul by St. Polycarp
Augustodúni natális sanctórum Mártyrum Andochii Presbyteri, Thyrsi Diáconi, et Felicis.  Hi, a beáto Polycarpo, Smyrnénsi Episcopo, ab Oriénte directi ad docéndam Gálliam, ibídem flagellis duríssime cæsi, ac tota die inversis mánibus suspénsi, et in ignem missi sunt, sed non combusti; tandem eórum colla véctibus feriúntur, et ita Mártyres gloriosíssime coronántur.
    At Autun, the birthday of the holy martyrs Andochius, a priest, Thyrsus, a deacon, and Felix, who were sent from the East by blessed Polycarp, bishop of Smyrna, to preach in France.  There they were severely scourged, hanged by the hands for a whole day, and cast into the fire.  Remaining uninjured, they had their necks broken with heavy bars, and thus won a most glorious crown.
Andochius and a deacon named Thyrsus went to Autun. There they converted a merchant, Felix, while staying with him. The three were arrested, tortured, and put to death by the Romans because they would not deny Christ.
Disciple of Saint Polycarp who sent him with Saint Benignus, Saint Andochius, and Saint Thyrsus to evangelize the Vivarais in Gaul
.
303 St. Paphnutius martyr of Egypt
In Ægypto pássio sanctórum Paphnutii et Sociórum Mártyrum.  Ipse, vitam in solitúdine agens, cum audíret multos Christiános in vínculis retineri, sponte, divino Spíritu concitus, Præfecto se offert, et Christiánam religiónem líbere profitétur; a quo primum catenis férreis constringitur, et in equuleo diutíssime torquétur, deínde cum áliis plurimis ad Diocletianum mittitur, cujus jussu, ipse palmæ affígitur, ceteri autem ferro necántur.
    In Egypt, the holy martyrs Paphnutius and his companions.  While leading a solitary life, St. Paphnutius heard that many Christians were kept in bonds.  Moved by the spirit of God, he voluntarily offered himself to the prefect, and freely confessed the Christian faith.  He was bound by him with iron chains, and for a long time tortured on the rack.  Then, being sent with many others to Diocletian, by his order he was fastened to a palm tree, and the rest were struck with the sword.
with companions. No details of this martyrdom are extant.
394 49 Martyrs of Chalcedon  members of the choir in the church of Chalcedon
Chalcédone sanctórum quadragínta novem Mártyrum, qui, post martyrium sanctæ Euphémiæ, sub Diocletiáno Imperatóre, damnáti ad béstias, et, cum ab iis divínitus líberi evasíssent, demum, gládio percússi, migravérunt in cælum.
    At Chalcedon, under Emperor Diocletian, after the martyrdom of St. Euphemia, forty-nine holy martyrs who were condemned to be devoured by the beasts, but being miraculously delivered, were finally struck with the sword and went to heaven.
A group of forty-nine Christians slain in Chalcedon during the reign of Emperor Diocletian. Records indicate that the martyrs were members of the choir in the church of Chalcedon.
446 St. Rusticus present also at the Council of Arles
Chalcédone sanctórum quadragínta novem Mártyrum, qui, post martyrium sanctæ Euphémiæ, sub Diocletiáno Imperatóre, damnáti ad béstias, et, cum ab iis divínitus líberi evasíssent, demum, gládio percússi, migravérunt in cælum.
    At Chalcedon, under Emperor Diocletian, after the martyrdom of St. Euphemia, forty-nine holy martyrs who were condemned to be devoured by the beasts, but being miraculously delivered, were finally struck with the sword and went to heaven.
Born either at Marseilles or at Narbonnaise, Gaul; died 26 Oct., 461. According to biographers, Rusticus is the one to whom St. Jerome (about 411) addressed a letter, commending him to imitate the virtues of St. Exuperius of Toulouse and to follow the advice of Procule, then Bishop of Marseilles.
   When he completed his education in Gaul, Rusticus went to Rome, where he soon gained a reputation as a public speaker, but he wished to embrace the contemplative life. He wrote to St. Jerome, who advised him to continue his studies. Thus Rusticus entered the monastery of St. Vincent of Lérins. He was ordained at Marseilles, and on 3 Oct., 430 (or 427) was consecrated Bishop of Narbonne. With all his zeal, he could not prevent the progress of the Arian heresy which the Goths were spreading abroad. The siege of Narbonne by the Goths and dissensions among the Catholics so disheartened him that he wrote to St. Leo, renouncing the bishoporic, but St. Leo dissuaded him. He then endeavoured to consolidate the Catholics. In 444-448, he built the church in Narbonne; in 451, he assisted at the convocation of forty-four bishops of Gaul and approved St. Leo's letter to Flavian, concerning Nestorianism; he was present also at the Council of Arles, with thirteen bishops, to decide the debate between Theodore, Bishop of Fréjus, and the Abbey of Lérins. A letter from Ravennius, Bishop of Arles, sent to Rusticus, proves the high esteem in which he was held. His letters are lost, with the exception of the one to St. Jerome and two others to St. Leo, written either in 452 or 458
.
658 ST GEREMARUS, OR GERMER; ABBOT
This saint was one of the numerous Frankish noblemen of whom we are told that, after marrying and following a secular career, they left the world and became distinguished in the monastic or other ecclesiastical life of their time. He belonged to the territory of Beauvais, and was attached in his youth to the court of Dagobert I, where he met his wife Domana, who was herself venerated as a saint in the diocese of Evreux. Their two girl children predeceased them, and their boy being grown up they, under the influence of St Audoenus, Bishop of Rouen, determined to embrace the religious life. Géremarus had already built a monastery near his birthplace, but he himself chose to receive the monastic habit at Pentate on the Risk, near Brionne. He was a model religious and became abbot of the house.  But strictness and regularity which are admired in a subject are not always so popular in a superior, and some of the monks at Pentale were very discontented under their new father. They were themselves such bad religious and even bad men that it is said they attempted to take the life of St Geremarus by fastening a sharp knife point upwards in the boards of his bed under the blanket-though unless he were a heavy man or in the habit of throwing himself into his bed, such a device was not likely to inflict a mortal wound.  hether for this reason or because of his unpopularity and lack of success in improving discipline, the abbot resigned his office and went to live as a hermit in a cave on the banks of the river. Here he passed five contented years, communing with God, working with his hands, and ministering to his neighbours, until one day news was brought to him of the death of his only son, Amalbert. "0 my God", he cried,"I thank thee.that thou hast shown thy mercy towards me by calling my son to thy glory". With the young man's estate which now reverted to him he founded a monastery at Flay, on the river Epte between Beauvais and Rouen, which was afterwards called Saint-Germer.
St Geremanas abandoned the solitary life to direct the new monastery till his death.
The Life of St Geremarus printed in the Acta Sanctorum (September, vol. vi) is not the earliest. That which B. Krusch has edited for MGH., Scnptores Merov. (vol. iv, pp. 626-633), is of older date, but Krusch shows that even this can only have been written a little before 851, and that as a source of history it is quite untrustworthy.  That printed by the Bollandists was compiled in the eleventh century.  There are other accounts such, for example, as that written by Guibert of Nogent, but all are legendary.
7th v. 675 St. Chuniald & Gislar missionaries so Germany Austria.
Irish or Scottish missionaries to southern Germany and Austria. They labored as disciples of St. Rupert Salzburg
.
733 St. Bercthun Benedictine abbot disciple of St. John of Beverley
He was appointed the first abbot of Beverley, in France, and worked ceaselessly to establish monastic life and cultural development in the region. He died there
.
1046 St. Gerard, bishop of Chzonad and martyr, patrician of Venice, called the apostle of the Hungarians
In Pannónia sancti Gerardi, Epíscopi Morisenæ sedis et Mártyris, Hungarórum Apóstoli nuncupati, patricii Veneti; qui, cum e Chanadiénsi oppido Albam Regalem se conferret, prope flumen Danubium ab infidelibus impetitus, lapídibus obrutus ac tandem lancea transfixus occubuit, sicque primus pátriam nobili martyrio illustrávit.
    In Hungary, St. Gerard, bishop of Chzonad and martyr, patrician of Venice, called the apostle of the Hungarians.  During a journey from the town of Chzonad to Alba Regalis he was attacked by the pagans near the river Danube, stoned by them, and then pierced with a lance.  He was thus the first to adorn his native land with a noble martyrdom.
ST GERARD, BISHOP OF Chzonad , MARTYR
ST GERARD, sometimes surnamed Sagredo, the apostle of a large district in Hungary, was a Venetian, born about the beginning of the eleventh century. At an early age he consecrated himself to the service of God in the Benedictine monastery of San Giorgio Maggiore at Venice, but after some time left it to undertake a pilgrimage to Jerusalem. While passing through Hungary he became known to the king, St Stephen, who made him tutor to his son, Bd Emeric, and Gerard began as well to preach with success. When St Stephen established the episcopal see of Csanad he appointed Gerard to be its first bishop. The greater part of the people were heathen, and those that bore the name of Christian were ignorant, brutish and savage, but St Gerard laboured among them with much fruit. He always so far as possible joined to the perfection of the episcopal state that of the contemplative life, which gave him fresh vigour in the discharge of his pastoral duties. But Gerard was also a scholar, and wrote an unfinished dissertation on the Hymn of the Three Young Men (Daniel iii), as well as other works which are lost.
   King Stephen seconded the zeal of the good bishop so long as he lived, but on his death in 1038 the realm was plunged into anarchy by competing claimants to the crown, and a revolt against Christianity began. Things went from bad to worse, and eventually, when celebrating Mass at a little place on the Danube called Giod, Gerard had prevision that he would on that day receive the crown of martyrdom. His party arrived at Buda and were going to cross the river, when they were set upon by some soldiers under the command of an obstinate upholder of idolatry and enemy of the memory of King St Stephen. They attacked St Gerard with a shower of stones, overturned his conveyance, and dragged him to the ground. Whilst in their hands the saint raised himself on his knees and prayed with St Stephen, "Lord, lay not this sin to their charge. They know not what they do." He had scarcely spoken these words when he was run through the body with a lance; the insurgents then hauled him to the edge of the cliff called the Blocksberg, on which they were, and dashed his body headlong into the Danube below. It was September 24, 1046. The heroic death of St Gerard had a profound effect, he was revered as a martyr, and his relics were enshrined in 1083 at the same time as those of St Stephen and his pupil Bd Emeric. In 1333 the republic of Venice obtained the greater part of his relics from the king of Hungary, and with great solemnity translated them to the church of our Lady of Murano, wherein St Gerard is venerated as the protomartyr of Venice, the place of his birth.
  1. The most reliable source for the history of St Gerard is, it appears, the short biography printed in the Acta Sanctorum, September, vol. vi (pp. 722-724). Contrary to the opinion previously entertained, it is not an epitome of the longer life which is found in Endlicher, Monumenta Arpadiana (pp. 205-234), but dates from the twelfth, or even the end of the eleventh, century. This, at least, is the conclusion of R. F. Kaindl in the Archiv f. Oesterreichische Geschichte, vol. xci (1902), pp. 1-58. The other biographies are later expansions of the first named, and not so trustworthy. St Gerard's story and episcopate have also been discussed by C. Juhász in Studien und Mittheilungen O.S.B., 1929, pp. 139-145, and 1930, pp. 1-35; and see C. A. Macartney, in Archivum Europae centro-orientalis, vol. iv (1938), pp. 456-490, on the Lives of St Gerard, and his Medieval Hungarian Historians (1953).
1048 St. Ysarn Benedictine abbot native of Toulouse.
France, he entered the Benedictines, served as a monk, and then was abbot of the monastery of St. Victor's at Marseilles
.
1218  Bd Robert Of Knaresborough; Like his fellow hermit and fellow Yorkshireman Richard Rolle, Robert Flower, the  Holy Hermit of Knaresborough", enjoyed a considerable cultus in medieval England which was never confirmed or made public by canonization. His name has not been found in calendars, but the Trinitarian church at Knaresborough was called St Robert's, and Matthew Paris mentions him with St Edmund of Abingdon and St Elizabeth of Hungary as one of the holiest persons of his time.
He was born about the year iióo at York, of which city his father was a citizen and at one time aspired to be a priest.  But he never proceeded beyond the subdiaconate, "for what cause God best knoweth", as Leland says. His brother was a Cistercian in Newminster Abbey at Morpeth and Robert followed him there, but four and a half months of novitiate was enough to demonstrate that his vocation was not to the cenobitical life. He was convinced that God was calling him to a dedicated life of some sort, and so, forgoing his patrimony as eldest son, he went to live in a cave adjoining a poor chapel called St Giles's below a cliff by the river Nidd, near Knaresborough. This cave was already occupied by a knight who, it is stated, was hiding from the wrath of his king rather than seeking the love of God, for immediately on the death of Richard I he deserted his cave and his companion and went home to his wife. Robert remained there till the offer of a cell and chapel of St Hilda at Rudfarlington enticed him further into the forest; his life here was rudely interrupted by the burglary and destruction of his hermitage by robbers. So he moved a few miles away to Spofforth, under the protection of the Percys, but he was beginning to become known as a holy man, and to avoid the people who insisted on coming to see him he fled in desperation to the priory of Hedley, near Tadcaster.  But Robert was no more successful as a Black than as a White monk, and when he took the liberty openly to criticize their interpretation of the Rule of St Benedict the monks dismissed him. He now went back to Rudfarlington, where his patroness gave him a barn and other buildings, some land, and four hinds to help him work it, and all went well for a year till he attracted the attention of William de Stuteville, constable of Knaresborough.  He suspected the hermit of giving shelter to thieves and outlaws and had his buildings pulled down about his ears. Robert fled back to St Giles's chapel where he had started, but was pursued by the wrath of the constable who found him there and intended to have him ejected. However, he changed his mind, because he had a dream in which three demons of most terrifying aspect threatened his life on account of his wrongs to the man of God.
   De Stuteville gave to Robert all the land between his cave and Grimbald's Crag, and also two horses, two oxen and two cows, which he was to farm for his own sustenance and the relief of the poor. Robert was now well provided for and left in peace, except that people of all degrees came to visit him "for to be edified".  Another brother, Walter, a prosperous burgess and mayor of York, urged him to go into a monastery-perhaps he thought a hermit brother, however holy, did not consort with his own dignity-but Robert replied in the words of the psalmist, "Hic habitabo, quoniam elegi cam".  So Walter agreed to send workmen to build a chapel of the Holy Cross, traces of which still remain beside the cave which the hermit enlarged by his own labour.
Unhappily the place is now more associated
with the crime of Eugene Aram in 1745 than Robert Flower, for in it the body of the murdered Daniel Clark was hidden.
    Several miracles of the hermit passed into the memory of the countryside and he was popularly esteemed to have waged long warfare with visible manifestations of the Devil; he also had a vision of his mother, asking him to pray for her in Purgatory and afterwards assuring him that his prayers were efficacious.
  Robert had a disciple called Yve who, after an early attempt to run away was spoiled by his breaking his leg, persevered in this solitary life and succeeded to Robert's hermitage after his death. From his master he learnt that a hermit's first duty, after his own sanctification, is to care for the poor and oppressed; Robert sheltered all unfortunates, whether  "deserving" or not, who came to him, and collected alms and worked hard on his land for the relief of the needy.
    He refused to pay tithes of corn and hay to the parson of Knaresborough, pointing out in rather forcible language that his land was already the patrimony of the poor.

  When King John was staying at Knaresborough Castle he visited the hermit, and is said to have found him at prayer. When Sir Brian de lisle called him to the king's presence, Robert presented him with an ear of corn, saying, "My lord king, can you with all your power make such a thing as this out of nothing?" John accepted the lesson in silence, but sycophantic (or kindly tactful) bystanders were quick to point out that Robert was mad. The king asked if there was anything he could give him, and the hermit replied there was nothing. But directly John was gone Yve rebuked his master for missing an opportunity of benefiting the poor;  Robert ran after the king, and a plow-land of the adjoining wood was granted.
  While Robert lay dying, monks came from Fountains Abbey, offering him the Cistercian habit, which he refused, warning Yve what would happen after his death.  And directly he was dead the monks again came, and wished to have his body for burial in their great minster.   But Robert had said that he was to be buried in his own chapel of Holy Cross, and soldiers were sent from the castle to guard the body until it was buried in the appointed place in the presence of crowds of weeping people, mourning the "devout, debonair and discreet man, than whom a milder could not be met".
After the death of Yve, Robert's hermitage came into the hands of the Trinitarian order, whose canons seem eventually to have removed his body into their own church at Knaresborough.

In Analecta Bollandiana, vol. lvii (1939), pp. 364-400, Fr P. Grosjean printed the prose life from the B.M. manuscript Egerton 3143, and an earlier but fragmentary life from Harleian Ms. 3775. These texts (with other matter) sre given in a slightly shortened form in the appendices to the Metrical Life of St Robert of Knaresborough (E.E.T.S. 1953), ed. by Joyce Bazire; this Middle English metrical life is also from Egerton 3143, which has been dated as late fifteenth century. See also A. F. Pollard in DNB., vol. xlviii; R. M. Clay, Hermits and Anchorites of England (1914); and Abbot J. I. Cummins in Yorkshire Archaeological Journal, vol. xxviii (1926), pp. 80-88, and his Legends, Saints and Shrines of Knaresborough (1928).  Robert Flower (who is often called Saint) has sometimes been confused with St Robert, Abbot of Newminster (d. 1159).
1581 Saint Nicander of Pskov (in Baptism Nikon); By power of prayer this monk conquered the weakness of flesh, human failings and diabolical apparitions.

Nicander was born 24 July 1507 into the peasant family of Philip and Anastasia in the village of Videlebo in the Pskov lands.  From childhood he dreamed of continuing the ascetic exploits of his fellow villager, St Euphrosynus of Spasoeleazar, the original Pskov wilderness-dweller (May 15). The first in Nikon's family to accept monasticism was his older brother Arsenius. After death of his father, the seventeen-year-old Nikon was able to convince his mother to dispose of the property and withdraw into a monastery, where she lived until her own end.
After visiting the monasteries of Pskov, and having venerated at the relics of St Euphrosynus and his disciple St Sava of Krypetsk (August 28), Nikon became firmly convinced of his calling to the solitary life.

In order to have the possibility of reading the Word of God, Nikon was employed as a worker for the Pskov resident Philip, who rewarded his ardor by sending him to study with an experienced teacher. Seeing the zeal of the youth, the Lord Himself directed him to the place of his ascetic effort. Intensely praying in one of the Pskov churches, he heard a voice from the altar commanding him to go to the wilderness place which the Lord would point out through His servant Theodore. The peasant Theodore led him off to the River Demyanka, between Pskov and Porkhov. Afterwards, both Philip and Theodore, who helped St Nicander attain his goal, were themselves to enter upon the path of monasticism, and were tonsured at the Krypetsk monastery with the names Philaret and Theodosius.

After several years of silence and severe ascetic deeds, emaciating his flesh, Nikon went to the monastery founded by St Sava of Krypetsk. The igumen, seeing his weakened body, would not agree to accept him at once, fearing that the difficulties of monastic life would be too much for him. Nikon fell down at the crypt of St Sava, and spoke to him as if to one alive, entreating him to take him into his monastery. The igumen relented and tonsured Nikon with the name Nicander.

St Nicander endured many temptations and woes on the path of asceticism. Blessed Nicholas (February 28) while still at Pskov predicted St Nicander's "wilderness sufferings." Through the prayers of all the Pskov Saints and St Alexander of Svir (August 30 and April 17), who twice appeared to him, guiding and strengthening him, and with the help of the grace of God, he overcame all the manifold snares of the Evil One.

By the power of prayer the monk conquered the weakness of flesh, human failings and diabolical apparitions. Once, robbers nearly killed him, running off with the hermit's stole, very precious possessions, his books and icons. Through the prayers of the saint, two of them, taking fright at the sudden death of one of their comrades, repented of their wicked deeds and received forgiveness from the Elder.

St Nicander did not long live at the Krypetsk monastery, and he obtained a blessing to return to his own wilderness. Later, he came to live at the Krypetsk monastery once again, where he fulfilled the obediences of ecclesiarch and cellerer, and then he went into the wilderness again and lived there in fasting and prayer, meditating on the Word the God.

Once a year, during Great Lent, St Nicander came to the Damianov monastery, where he made his confession and received the Holy Mysteries of Christ. Eight years before his death he received the Great Schema. Many people began to come to the monk "for benefit," since in the words of St John of the Ladder, "monastic life is a light for all mankind." Believers turned to St Nicander for prayerful help, since the Lord had bestown on him many gifts of grace.

The wilderness-dweller had regard for all the needs of the visitors and even built lodging for them, "the guest-house at the oak," for which he provided heat. The monk did not permit himself to show off his spiritual gifts. Going secretly to his cell, people always heard him praying with bitter tears. When he noticed there were people nearby, he immediately began to pray, concealing from them the gift of tears that he had received.

St Nicander to the end of his life remained a wilderness-dweller, but he gave final instructions that after his death the place of his ascetic efforts should not be forsaken, promising his protection to the settlers of a future monastery. The saint gave final directions to the deacon Peter of the Porkhov women's monastery to build a church at his grave and transfer there the icon of the Annunciation of the Most Holy Theotokos from the Tishanka church cemetery.

He foresaw his own death, predicting that he would die when enemies invaded the fatherland, and foretelling this immanent assault. On September 24, 1581, during an invasion by the army of the Polish king Stephen Bathory, a certain peasant found the monk dead. He lay on his cot with his hands crossed on his chest. From Pskov came clergy and people who revered the monk, and among whom was also the deacon Peter, and they performed the rite of Christian burial.

In 1584 at the place of St Nicander's ascetic deeds, sanctified by almost half a century of prayer, a monastery was built, which they began to call the Nikandrov wilderness-monastery. The builder of this monastery was St Isaiah, who had been healed through prayer to the saint.

The glorification of St Nicander occurred under Patriarch Joachim in 1696, and the feastdays in his memory were established for September 24, the day of his repose, and on the temple feast of the monastery, the Annunciation to the Most Holy Theotokos. During a reconstruction of the monastery cathedral church the relics of St Nicander were discovered, concealed in a wall. June 29 is celebrated as the day of the uncovering of his holy relics. At present, strong bonds of prayer connect believers with St Nicander, who is deeply venerated in the Pskov area.

Feast of Our Lady of Ransom
Festum beátæ Maríæ Vírginis de Mercéde nuncupátæ, Ordinis redemptiónis captivórum sub ejus nómine Institutrícis, de cujus Apparitióne ágitur quarto Idus Augústi.
    The feast of our Lady of Ransom, Foundress of the Order for the Redemption of Captives.  The apparition of the same Blessed Virgin occurred on the 10th of August.
24 September, a double major, commemorates the foundation of the Mercedarians.

On 10 August, 1223, the Mercedarian Order was legally constituted at Barcelona by King James of Aragon and was approved by Gregory IX on 17 January, 1235. The Mercedarians celebrated their institution on the Sunday nearest to 1 Aug. (on which date in the year 1233 the Blessed Virgin was believed to have shown St. Peter Nolasco the white habit of the order), and this custom was approved by the Congregation of Rites on 4 April, 1615 (Anal. Juris Pont., VII, 136). But the calendar of the Spanish Mercedarians of 1644 has it on 1 Aug., double. Proper lessons were approved on 30 April, 1616. The feast was granted to Spain (Sunday nearest to 1 Aug.) on 15 Feb., 1680; to France, 4 Dec., 1690. On 22 Feb., 1696, it was extended to the entire Latin Church, and the date changed to 24 September. The Mercedarians keep this feast as a double of the first class, with a vigil, privileged octave, and proper Office under the title: "Solemnitas Descensionis B. Mariæ V. de Mercede". Our Lady of Ransom is the principal patron of Barcelona; the proper Office was extended to Barcelona (1868) and to all Spain (second class, 1883). Sicily, which had suffered so much from the Saracens, took up the old date of the feast (Sunday nearest to 1 Aug.) by permission of the Congregation of Rites, 31 Aug., 1805 (double major), Apparition of Our Lady to St. Peter Nolasco in the choir of Barcelona, on the Sunday after 24 Sept. In England the devotion to Our Lady of Ransom was revived in modern times to obtain the rescue of England as Our Lady's Dowry .

OUR LADY OF RANSOM
THE first entry in the Roman Martyrology today is, "The feast of blessed Mary the Virgin, called of Ransom, institutress of the Order for the Redemption of Captives under that title. Her Appearing is mentioned on August 10", and accordingly under that date we find, "The Appearing in Spain of blessed Mary, etc. In the account of St Peter Nolasco on January 28 we referred to difficulties surrounding history of the foundation of this order (vulgo Mercedarians), particularly the unsatisfactory nature of the evidence for the apparitions of our Lady to St Peter and others. The date of the order's first foundation in Spain was August 10 (in 1218 or 1223 or 1228), but the feast commemorating this event, under the name of the Solemnity of the Coming-down of Our Lady of Ransom, was kept by the Mercedarians on the Sunday nearest to August 1. The feast was granted to Spain at large in 1680, and extended to the whole Western church, for its present date, in 1696.
  The invocation of our Lady under this title for the conversion of England has nothing to do with the historical and liturgical aspects of the feast.  Our Lady of Pity was an old name for her in this country, expressing a cognate idea to "ransom", and she may be regarded as interceding for our country's release from the bonds of religious error, just as in the prayer of the Mass today we ask for the deliverance of the faithful people from the bonds of sin.
See F. G. Holweck, Calendarium festorum Dei et Dei Matris (1925), p. 327, who seems to accept the Mercedarian traditions a little too trustfully  he also appeals to D. Perez Sanjulian, Historia de La SS. Virgen Maria (1912), vol. ii, p. 645. It was a project of Pope Benedict XIV's commission for the reform of the Roman Breviary to suppress this feast of our Lady of Ransom, a project to which effect has been given in the calendar approved for the Benedictines in 1915.
1721 ST PACIFICO OF SAN SEVERINO
Septémpedæ, in Picéno, deposítio sancti Pacífici, Sacerdótis ex Ordine Minórum et Confessóris, exímiæ patiéntiæ viri et solitúdinis amóre præclári, quem Gregórius Papa Décimus sextus in Sanctórum cánonem rétulit.
    At San Severino in Piceno, the death of St. Pacificus, priest and confessor of the Order of Friars Minor of St. Francis of the Reformed Observance.  Illustrious for his great patience and his love of solitude, he was enrolled in the canon of the saints by Pope Gregory XVI.


At Mass he was often rapt in ecstasy; gift of prophecy ability to read the consciences of his penitents Miracles took place at his tomb, as they had done in his lifetime; "Moreover, I advise and admonish the friars that in their preaching, their words should be examined and chaste. They should aim only at the advantage and spiritual good of their listeners, telling them briefly about vice and virtue, punishment and glory, because our Lord himself kept his words short on earth" (St. Francis, Rule of 1223, Ch. 9).

IN the year 1653 there was born to Antony Divini and Mary Bruni, at San Severino in the March of Ancona, a son, who was baptized under the names of Charles Antony. When he was about five both his parents died, leaving him to the care of his maternal uncle, a harsh and disagreeable man. He used the boy simply as a servant about the house and treated him with something less than the consideration due to a servant, all of which Charles bore with patience and humility until, in his seventeenth year, he offered himself to the Friars Minor of the Observance. In 1670 he was clothed in their monastery at Forano and received the name of Pacifico.  After the usual course of studies he was ordained at the age of twenty-five. For the two following years he taught philosophy to the junior friars and then, representing to his superiors that preaching was a more suitable employment for him, he was sent out on mission work in the neighbouring villages and hamlets.  His sweet and simple discourses were everywhere well received, and were strengthened in their effect by his ability to read the consciences of his penitents.  He reminded one James Sconocchia at Cingoli that he had forgotten to confess two sins of profanity, and another penitent said that the friar had brought back to his memory occasions on which he had been unkind to his mother and had entertained unchaste thoughts.  But the public apostolate of Brother Pacifico was destined to last only for six or seven years, for when he was thirty-five he was overtaken by both deafness and blindness and by a chronic ulceration of his legs which almost crippled him. He continued to live at Forano, passing his time in prayer, penance and almsdeeds, but having for a short time filled the offices of vicar and guardian of the friary of San Severino, he was in 1705 transferred to that house where, amid the friends and scenes of his childhood, he passed the rest of his life.
    On several occasions St Pacifico displayed the gift of prophecy, as, for example, in 1717 when he foretold the victory of Prince Eugene of Savoy over the Turks at Belgrade.  As though his natural bodily afflictions were not enough, he still further mortified himself with hair-shirt and discipline, and his superiors had to interfere to limit his fasts.  At Mass he was often rapt in ecstasy, sometimes for several hours. During the month of July 1721 he received a visit from the bishop of San Severino, and as he was leaving St Pacifico suddenly cried out "My lord-Heaven, Heaven I And I shall soon follow you." Within fifteen days the bishop was dead, and on the following September 24 St Pacifico died also. Miracles took place at his tomb, as they had done in his lifetime, and in 1752 his cause was begun; Cardinal Henry of York was ponente and Mgr (afterwards Cardinal) Erskine promoter of the faith.  He was canonized in 1839.
   Several biographies have been published since the saint was canonized, notably those of Melehiorri (1839), Bernardino da Gajoli (1898), and Diotallevi (1910).    See also Léon, Auréole Séraphique (Eng. trans.), vol. iii, pp. 224-229.

 St. Pacifico of San Severino 1653-1721
    Pacifico was born into a distinguished family in San Severino in the Marche of Ancona in central Italy. After joining the Friars Minor, he was ordained. He taught philosophy for two years and then began a successful preaching career.  Pacifico was an ascetic man. He fasted perpetually, eating no more than bread, soup or water. His "hair shirt" was made of iron. Poverty and obedience were two virtues for which his confreres especially remembered him.

At the age of 35, Pacifico contracted an illness that eventually left him deaf, blind and crippled. He offered his sufferings for the conversion of sinners, and he cured many of the sick who came to him. Pacifico also served as the superior of the friary in San Severino. He was canonized in 1839.

Comment: Pacifico lived out the words of St. Francis cited below. His preaching and ministry were linked to his life of penance.
    Francis urged his brothers to proclaim the Word of God without fanfare or self-interest. In that way, their words were truly God’s and directed toward the welfare of their listeners. The way Pacifico lived made his preaching all the more effective, for his listeners knew the power present in his words.

Quote:  "Moreover, I advise and admonish the friars that in their preaching, their words should be examined and chaste. They should aim only at the advantage and spiritual good of their listeners, telling them briefly about vice and virtue, punishment and glory, because our Lord himself kept his words short on earth" (St. Francis, Rule of 1223, Ch. 9).

1794 On the anniversary of the arrival of the Russian missionaries in Alaska, we remember the New Martyrs St Peter the Aleut, Protomartyr of America, and St Juvenal.
Saint Peter the Aleut is mentioned in the Life of St Herman of Alaska (December 13). Simeon Yanovsky (who ended his life as the schemamonk Sergius in the St Tikhon of Kaluga Monastery), has left the following account:

"On another occasion I was relating to him how the Spanish in California had imprisoned fourteen Aleuts, and how the Jesuits (actually Franciscans) were forcing all of them to accept the Catholic Faith. But the Aleuts would not agree under any circumstances, saying, 'We are Christians.' The Jesuits argued, 'That's not true, you are heretics and schismatics. If you do not agree to accept our faith then we will torture all of you to death.' Then the Aleuts were placed in prisons two to a cell. That evening, the Jesuits came to the prison with lanterns and lighted candles. Again they tried to persuade two Aleuts in the cell to accept the Catholic Faith. 'We are Christians,' the Aleuts replied, 'and we will not change our Faith.' Then the Jesuits began to torture them, at first the one while his companion was a witness. They cut off one of the joints of his feet, and then the other joint. Then they cut the first joint on the fingers of his hands, and then the other joint. Then they cut off his feet, and his hands. The blood flowed, but the martyr endured all and firmly repeated one thing: "I am a Christian.' He died in such suffering, due to a loss of blood. The Jesuit also promised to torture his comrade to death the next day.

But that night an order was received from Monterey stating that the imprisoned Aleuts were to be released immediately, and sent there under escort. Therefore, in the morning all were sent to Monterey with the exception of the dead Aleut. This was related to me by a witness, the same Aleut who had escaped torture, and who was the friend of the martyred Aleut. I reported this incident to the authorities in St Petersburg. When I finished my story, Father Herman asked, 'What was the name of the martyred Aleut?' I answered, 'Peter. I do not remember his family name.' The Elder stood reverently before an icon, made the Sign of the Cross and said, "Holy New Martyr Peter, pray to God for usl"

We know very little about St Peter, except that he was from Kodiak, and was arrested and put to death by the Spaniards in California because he refused to convert to Catholicism. The circumstances of his martyrdom recall the torture of St James the Persian (November 27).

Both in his sufferings and in his steadfast confession of the Faith, St Peter is the equal of the martyrs of old, and also of the New Martyrs who have shone forth in more recent times. Now he rejoices with them in the heavenly Kingdom, glorifying God, the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit, throughout all ages.

Saint Juvenal, the Protomartyr of America, was born in 1761 in Nerchinsk, Siberia. His secular name was John Feodorovich Hovorukhin, and he was trained as a mining engineer. In a letter to Abbot Nazarius of Valaam (December 13, 1819), St Herman says that St Juvenal "had been an assistant at our monastery and was a former officer."

After his wife died in 1791, John entered a monastery at St Petersburg (St Herman's Letter of December 13, 1819) and was tonsured with the name Juvenal. Three years later, he went to Alaska as a missionary.

During 1794, the hieromonks Juvenal and Macarius spent two months in the area around Kodiak teaching the inhabitants about Christ and baptizing them. They traveled in small boats of hide in all sorts of weather, dividing up the territory among themselves. St Herman tells of a conversation he heard one day as he walked with the hieromonks to a small hill on the south side of the harbor. They sat down facing the sea, and spoke of various things. Soon they began to discuss where each of them should go to preach. Aflame with zeal and eager to set out on their journey, a friendly argument ensued between Fr Macarius and Fr Juvenal. Fr Macarius said he intended to go north to the Aleutian Islands, and then make his way to the Alaskan mainland, where the inhabitants had invited him to visit. The monks had a map of Captain Cook's which indicated that some Russians were living near a certain river in that particular area, and Fr Macarius hoped to find them.

Fr Juvenal interrupted, saying that he believed that the Alaskan mainland was his territory. "I beg you to yield to me and not offend me in this," he told Fr Macarius, "since the ship is leaving for Yakutan. I shall begin preaching in the south, proceeding north along the ocean, cross the Kenai peninsula, then from the port there I shall cross to Alaska."

Fr Macarius became sorrowful and said, "No, Father. Do not restrict me in this way. You know the Aleutian chain of islands is joined to Alaska, therefore it belongs to me, and also the whole northern shore. As for you, the southern part of America is sufficient for your whole lifetime, if you please."


As he listened to their apostolic fervor, St Herman says he "went from joy to rapture" (Letter to Abbot Nazarius, May 19, 1795).

In 1795, Father Juvenal baptized over 700 Chugatchi at Nushek, then he crossed Kenai Bay and baptized the local people there. In 1796, according to native oral tradition, St Juvenal came to the mouth of the Kuskokwim near the present village of Quinahgak, where he was killed by a hunting party (There is a forged diary attributed to Ivan Petroff which gives a slanderous version of Fr Juvenal's death, and alleges that he was martyred at Lake Iliamna).

The precise reason for St Juvenal's murder by the natives is not known. However, they later told St Innocent something about his death. They said that St Juvenal did not try to defend himself when attacked, nor did he make any attempt to escape. After being struck from behind, he turned to face his attackers and begged them to spare the natives he had baptized.

The natives told St Innocent that after they had killed St Juvenal, he got up and followed them, urging them to repent. The fell upon him again and gave him a savage beating. Once more, he got to his feet and called them to repentance. This happened several times, then finally the natives hacked him to pieces. Thus, the zealous Hieromonk Juvenal became the first Orthodox Christian in America to receive the crown of martyrdom. His unnamed guide, possibly a Tanaina Indian convert, was also martyred at the same time.

It is said that a local shaman removed St Juvenal's brass pectoral cross from his body and attempted to cast a spell. Unexpectedly, the shaman was lifted up off the ground. He made three more tries with the same result, then concluded that there was a greater power than his own at work here. Years later, a man showed up at the Nushagak Trading Post wearing a brass pectoral cross exactly like the one worn by St Juvenal.

A column of light arose from his holy relics and reached up to Heaven. It is not known how long this phenomenon continued.

St Juvenal, in his tireless evangelization of the native peoples of Alaska, served the Church more than all the other missionaries combined.



On Death and Life
"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!
   (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)


Month by Month of Saintly Dedications


The Rosary html Mary Mother of GOD -- Her Rosary Here
Mary Mother of GOD Mary's Divine Motherhood: FEASTS OF OUR LADY
     of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

May 9 – Our Lady of the Wood (Italy, 1607) 
Months of Dedication
January is the month of the Holy Name of Jesus since 1902;
March is the month of Saint Joseph since 1855;
May, the month of Mary, is the oldest and most well-known Marian month, officially since 1724;
June is the month of the Sacred Heart since 1873;
July is the month of the Precious Blood since 1850;
August is the month of the Immaculate Heart of Mary;
September is the month of Our Lady of Sorrows since 1857;
October is the month of the Rosary since 1868;
November is the month of the Holy Souls in Purgatory since 1888;
December is the month of the Immaculate Conception.

In all, five months of the year are dedicated to Mary.
The idea of dedicating months came from Rome and promotion of the month of Mary owes much to the Jesuits.  arras.catholique.fr


Pray that the witness of 40 Days for Life bears abundant fruit, and that we begin again each day to storm the gates of hell until God welcomes us into the gates of heaven.

If you seek patience, you will find no better example than the cross. Great patience occurs in two ways:
either when one patiently suffers much, or when one suffers things which one is able to avoid and yet does not avoid.
Christ endured much on the cross, and did so patiently, because when he suffered he did not threaten;
he was led like a sheep to the slaughter and he did not open his mouth.-- St. Thomas Aquinas


We begin our day by seeing Christ in the consecrated bread, and throughout the day we continue to see Him in the torn bodies of our poor. We pray, that is, through our work, performing it with Jesus, for Jesus and upon Jesus.
The poor are our prayer. They carry God in them. Prayer means praying everything, praying the work.
We meet the Lord who hungers and thirsts, in the poor.....and the poor could be you or I or any person kind enough to show us his or her love and to come to our place.
Because we cannot see Christ, we cannot express our love to Him in person.
But our neighbor we can see, and we can do for him or her what we would love to do for Jesus if He were visible.
-- Mother Teresa
My God, I believe, I adore, I trust and I love Thee.  I beg pardon for those who do not believe, do not adore, do not love Thee.  O most Holy trinity, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, I adore Thee profoundly.
 I offer Thee the most precious Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ, present in all the Tabernacles of the world,  in reparation for the outrages, sacrileges and indifference by which He is offended,
and by the infite merits of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

I beg the conversion of poor sinners,  Amen Fatima Prayer, Angel of Peace
Mary's Divine Motherhood
Pope Francis and Pope Benedict XVI { 2013 } Catholic Church In China { article here}
1648 to1930 St. Augustine Zhao Rong and 120 Companions Christianity arrived in China by way of Syria -- 600s.
        Depending on China's relations with outside world,
Christianity for centuries was free to grow or forced to operate secretly.

How do I start the Five First Saturdays? 
Called in the Gospel “the Mother of Jesus,” Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as “the Mother of my Lord” (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son, the second person of the Holy Trinity. Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos). 
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
“The Blessed Virgin was eternally predestined, in conjunction with the incarnation of the divine Word, to be the Mother of God. By decree of divine Providence, she served on earth as the loving mother of the divine Redeemer, an associate of unique nobility, and the Lord's humble handmaid. She conceived, brought forth, and nourished Christ.”
The voice of the Father is heard, the Son enters the water, and the Holy Spirit appears in the form of a dove.
   THE spirit and example of the world imperceptibly instil the error into the minds of many that there is a kind of middle way of going to Heaven; and so, because the world does not live up to the gospel, they bring the gospel down to the level of the world. It is not by this example that we are to measure the Christian rule, but words and life of Christ. All His followers are commanded to labour to become perfect even as our heavenly Father is perfect, and to bear His image in our hearts that we may be His children. We are obliged by the gospel to die to ourselves by fighting self-love in our hearts, by the mastery of our passions, by taking on the spirit of our Lord.
   These are the conditions under which Christ makes His promises and numbers us among His children, as is manifest from His words which the apostles have left us in their inspired writings. Here is no distinction made or foreseen between the apostles or clergy or religious and secular persons. The former, indeed, take upon themselves certain stricter obligations, as a means of accomplishing these ends more perfectly; but the law of holiness and of disengagement of the heart from the world is geeral and binds all the followers of Christ.

Join Mary of Nazareth Project help us build the International Marian Center of Nazareth
http://www.worldpriest.com/
THE EUCHARIST, A MYSTERY TO BE BELIEVED POST-SYNODAL APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION
SACRAMENTUM CARITATIS OF THE HOLY FATHER BENEDICT XVI
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Miracles by Century 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000    1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800   1900  Miracles_BLay Saints
Morning Prayer and Hymn    Meditation of the Day    Prayer for Priests    Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List  Here
We are called upon with the whole Church militant on earth to join in praising and thanking God for the grace and glory he has bestowed on his saints. At the same time we earnestly implore Him to exert His almighty power and mercy in raising us from our miseries and sins, healing the disorders of our souls and leading us by the path of repentance to the company of His saints, to which He has called us.
   They were once what we are now, travellers on earth they had the same weaknesses, which we have. We have difficulties to encounter so had the saints, and many of them far greater than we can meet with; obstacles from kings and whole nations, sometimes from the prisons, racks and swords of persecutors. Yet they surmounted these difficulties, which they made the very means of their virtue and victories. It was by the strength they received from above, not by their own, that they triumphed. But the blood of Christ was shed for us as it was for them and the grace of our Redeemer is not wanting to us; if we fail, the failure is in ourselves.
   THE saints and just, from the beginning of time and throughout the world, who have been made perfect, everlasting monuments of God’s infinite power and clemency, praise His goodness without ceasing; casting their crowns before His throne they give to Him all the glory of their triumphs: “His gifts alone in us He crowns.”
“The saints must be honored as friends of Christ and children and heirs of God, as John the theologian and evangelist says: ‘But as many as received him, he gave them the power to be made the sons of God....’ Let us carefully observe the manner of life of all the apostles, martyrs, ascetics and just men who announced the coming of the Lord. And let us emulate their faith, charity, hope, zeal, life, patience under suffering, and perseverance unto death, so that we may also share their crowns of glory” Exposition of the Orthodox Faith

Called in the Gospel the Mother of Jesus, Mary is acclaimed by Elizabeth, at the prompting of the Spirit and even before the birth of her son, as the Mother of my Lord (Lk 1:43; Jn 2:1; 19:25; cf. Mt 13:55; et al.). In fact, the One whom she conceived as man by the Holy Spirit, who truly became her Son according to the flesh, was none other than the Father's eternal Son,  the second person of the Holy Trinity.
Hence the Church confesses that Mary is truly Mother of God (Theotokos).
Catechism of the Catholic Church 495, quoting the Council of Ephesus (431): DS 251.
Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart ... From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque
On Friday during Holy Communion, He said these words to me, His unworthy slave, if I mistake not:
I promise you in the excessive mercy of my Heart that its all-powerful love will grant to all those who receive Holy Communion on nine first Fridays of consecutive months the grace of final repentance; they will not die under my displeasure or without receiving their sacraments, my divine Heart making itself their assured refuge at the last moment.
Margaret Mary was inspired by Christ to establish the Holy Hour and to pray lying prostrate with her face to the ground from eleven till midnight on the eve of the first Friday of each month, to share in the mortal sadness.
He endured when abandoned by His Apostles in His Agony, and to receive holy Communion on the first Friday of every month. In the first great revelation, He made known to her His ardent desire to be loved by men and His design of manifesting His Heart with all Its treasures of love and mercy, of sanctification and salvation.
He appointed the Friday after the octave of the feast of Corpus Christi as the feast of the Sacred Heart; He called her the Beloved Disciple of the Sacred Heart, and the heiress of all Its treasures. The love of the Sacred Heart was the fire which consumed her, and devotion to the Sacred Heart is the refrain of all her writings. In her last illness she refused all alleviation, repeating frequently: What have I in heaven and what do I desire on earth, but Thee alone, O my God, and died pronouncing the Holy Name of Jesus.
With regard to this promise it may be remarked: (1) that our Lord required Communion to be received on a particular day chosen by Him; (2) that the nine Fridays must be consecutive; (3) that they must be made in honor of His Sacred Heart, which means that those who make the nine Fridays must practice the devotion and must have a great love for our Lord; (4) that our Lord does not say that those who make the nine Fridays will be dispensed from any of their obligations or from exercising the vigilance necessary to lead a good life and overcome temptation; rather He implicitly promises abundant graces to those who make the nine Fridays to help them to carry out these obligations and persevere to the end; (5) that perseverance in receiving Holy Communion for nine consecutive First Firdays helps the faithful to acquire the habit of frequent Communion, which our Lord eagerly desires; and (6) that the practice of the nine Fridays is very pleasing to our Lord He promises such great reward, and all Catholics should endeavor to make nine Fridays.
How do I start the Five First Saturdays? by Fr. Tom O'Mahony.
On July 13,1917, Our Lady appeared for the third time to the three children of Fatima an showed them the vision of hell and made the now - famous thirteen prophecies. In this vision Our Lady said that 'GOD WISHES TO ESTABLISH IN THE WORLD DEVOTION to Her Immaculate Heart and that She would come TO ASK FOR THE COMMUNION OF REPARATION ON THE FIRST SATURDAYS...'  Eight years later, on December 10, 1925, Our Lady did indeed come back. She appeared (with the Child Jesus) to Lucia in the convent of the Dorothean Sisters in Pontevedra.
The Child Jesus spoke first:
'HAVE COMPASSION ON THE HEART OF YOUR MOST HOLY MOTHER WHICH IS COVERED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT, WHILE THERE IS NO ONE TO REMOVE THEM WITH AN ACT OF REPARATION.'

THE GREAT PROMISE
Our Lady then said: 'MY DAUGHTER LOOK AT MY HEART SURROUNDED WITH THORNS WITH WHICH UNGRATEFUL MEN PIERCE IT AT EVERY MOMENT BY THEIR BLASPHEMIES AND INGRATITUDE. YOU, AT LEAST, TRY TO CONSOLE ME, AND SAY THAT I PROMISE TO ASSIST AT THE HOUR OF DEATH WITH ALL THE GRACES NECESSARY FOR SALVATION, ALL THOSE WHO, ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS GO TO CONFESSION AND RECEIVE HOLY COMMUNION, RECITE FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY AND KEEP ME COMPANY FOR A QUARTER OF AN HOUR WHILE MEDITATING ON MYSTERIES OF THE ROSARY, WITH THE INTENTION OF MAKING REPARATION TO ME.'

The Five Reasons
Lucia once asked this question of Our Lord and received as an answer: 'MY DAUGHTER, THE MOTIVE IS SIMPLE, THERE ARE FIVE KINDS OF OFFENCES AND BLASPHEMIES UTTERED AGAINST THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY: (1) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION: (2) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER VIRGINITY: (3) BLASPHEMIES AGAINST HER DIVINE MATERNITY: (4) BLASPHEMIES OF THOSE WHO OPENLY SEEK TO FOSTER IN THE HEARTS OF CHILDREN INDIFFERENCE OR EVEN HATRED FOR THIS IMMACULATE MOTHER: (5) THE OFFENCES OF THOSE WHO DIRECTLY OUTRAGE HER IN HOLY IMAGES.'
From the above, it is easy to see that each of the Five Saturdays can correspond to a specific offence. By offering the graces received during each First Saturday as reparation for the offence being prayed for, the participant can hope to help remove the thorns from Our Lady's Heart.
What Do I Have To Do?
The devotion of First Saturdays, as requested by Our Lady of Fatima, carries with it the assurance of salvation. However, to derive profit from such a great promise of Our Lady, the devotion must be properly understood and duly performed.
The requirements as stipulated by Our Lady are as follows:
(1) CONFESSION, (2) COMMUNION, (3) FIVE DECADES OF THE ROSARY, (4) MEDITATION ON ONE OR MORE OF THE ROSARY MYSTERIES FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES, (5) TO DO ALL THESE THINGS IN THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION TO THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY, and (6) TO OBSERVE ALL THESE PRACTICES ON THE FIRST SATURDAY OF FIVE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS.
(1) CONFESSION: A reparative confession means that the confession should not only be good (valid and licit), but also be offered in the spirit of reparation, in this case, to Mary's Immaculate Heart. This confession may be made on the First Saturday itself or some days before or after the First Saturday within the preceding octave would suffice.
(2) COMMUNION: The communion of reparation must be sacramental duly received with the intention of making reparation. This offering, like the confession, is an interior act and so no external action to express the intention is needed.
(3) THE ROSARY: The Rosary mentioned here was indicated by the Portuguese word 'terco' which is commonly employed to denote a Rosary of five decades, since it forms a fourth of the full Rosary of 20 decades. This too must recited in a spirit of reparation.
(4) MEDITATION FOR FIFTEEN MINUTES: Here the meditation on one mystery or more is to be made without simultaneous recitation of the Rosary decade. As indicated, the meditation may be either on one mystery alone for 15 minutes, or on all 20 mysteries, spending about one minute on each mystery, or again, on two or more mysteries during the period. This can also be made before each decade spending three minutes or more in considering the mystery of the particular decade. This meditation has likewise to be made in the spirit of reparation to the Immaculate Heart.
(5) THE SPIRIT OF REPARATION: All these acts, as said above, have to be done with the intention of offering reparation to the Immaculate Heart of Mary for the offences committed against Her. Everyone who offends Her commits, so to speak, a two-fold offence, for these sins also offend her Divine Son, Christ, and so endanger our salvation. They give bad example to others and weaken the strength of society to withstand immoral onslaughts. Such devotions therefore make us consider not only the enormity of the offence against God, but also the effect of sins on human society as well as the need for undoing these social effects even when the offender repents and is converted. Further, this reparation emphasises our responsibility towards sinners who, themselves, will not pray and make reparation for their sins.
(6) FIVE CONSECUTIVE FIRST SATURDAYS: The idea of the Five First Saturdays is obviously to make us persevere in the devotional acts for these Saturdays and overcome initial difficulties. Once this is done, Our Lady knows that the person would become devoted to Her immaculate Heart and persist in practising such devotion on all First Saturdays, working thereby for personal self-reform and for the salvation of others.

Unless Russia is converted, the movement against God and for sin will continue to spread, promoting wars and persecutions, and making the attainment for peace and justice impossible for this world. One means of obtaining Russia's conversion is to practise the Fatima Message. The stakes are so great that to encourage Catholics to practise the devotion of the First Saturdays, Our Lady has assured us that She will obtain salvation for all those who observe the first Saturdays for five consecutive months in accordance with Her conditions.
At the supreme moment the departing person will be either in the state of grace or not. In either case Our Lady will be by his side. If in the state of grace, She will console and help him to resist whatever temptations the devil might put before him in his last attempt to take the person with him to hell. If not in the state of grace, Our Lady will help the person to repent in a manner agreeable to God and so benefit by the fruits of redemption and be saved.

God loves variety. He doesn't mass-produce his saints. Every saint is unique, for each is the result of a new idea.  As the liturgy says: Non est inventus similis illis--there are no two exactly alike. It is we with our lack of imagination, who paint the same haloes on all the saints. Dear Lord, grant us a spirit that is not bound by our own ideas and preferences.  Grant that we may be able to appreciate in others what we lack in ourselves. O Lord, grant that we may understand that every saint must be a unique praise of Your glory. Catholic saints are holy people and human people who lived extraordinary lives.  Each saint the Church honors responded to God's invitation to use his or her unique gifts.   God calls each one of us to be a saint in order to get into heavenonly saints are allowed into heaven. The more "extravagant" graces are bestowed NOT for the benefit of the recipients so much as FOR the benefit of others.
There are over 10,000 named saints beati  from history
 and Roman Martyology Orthodox sources

Patron_Saints.html  Widowed_Saints htmIndulgences The Catholic Church in China
LINKS: Marian Shrines  
India Marian Shrine Lourdes of the East   Lourdes 1858  China Marian shrines 1995
Kenya national Marian shrine  Loreto, Italy  Marian Apparitions (over 2000Quang Tri Vietnam La Vang 1798
 
Links to Related MarianWebsites  Angels and Archangels  Saints Visions of Heaven and Hell

Widowed Saints  html
Doctors_of_the_Church   Acts_Of_The_Apostles  Roman Catholic Popes  Purgatory  UniateChalcedon

Mary the Mother of Jesus Miracles_BLay Saints  Miraculous_IconMiraculous_Medal_Novena Patron Saints
Miracles by Century 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000    1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800  1900 2000
Miracles 100   200   300   400   500   600   700    800   900   1000  
 
1100   1200   1300   1400  1500  1600  1700  1800   1900 Lay Saints
The POPES HTML
Pius IX 1846--1878 • Leo XIII 1878-1903 • Pius X 1903-1914• Benedict XV 1914-1922 • Pius XI 1922-1939 • Pius XII 1939-1958 • John XXIII 1958-1963 • Paul VI 1963 to 1978 • John Paul • John Paul II 10/16/1975-4/2/2005 Benedict XVI

Pope St. Clement:  Since all things lie open to His eyes and ears, let us hold Him in awe and rid ourselves of impure desires to do works of evil, so that we may be protected by His mercy from the judgement that is to come.
Which of us can escape His mighty hand? 

"The answers to many of life's questions can be found by reading the Lives of the Saints. They teach us how to overcome obstacles and difficulties, how to stand firm in our faith, and how to struggle against evil and emerge victorious."  1913 Saint Barsanuphius of Optina
The more "extravagant" graces are bestowed NOT for the benefit of the recipients so much as FOR benefit of others.
Non est inventus similis illis
God calls each one of us to be a saint in order to get into heaven.

Popes mentioned in articles of Saints today
   
67 Saint Linus a native of Tuscany succeeded St. Peter as Pope
Romæ sancti Lini, Papæ et Mártyris, qui, primus post beátum Petrum Apóstolum, Romanum Ecclésiam gubernávit, et, martyrio coronátus, sepúltus est in Vaticano, prope eundem Apóstolum.
    At Rome, St. Linus, pope and martyr, who governed the Roman Church next after the blessed apostle Peter. 
He was crowned with martyrdom and was buried on the Vatican Hill beside the same apostle.

Cross Not Optional, Says Benedict XVI
Reflects on Peter's "Immature" Faith CASTEL GANDOLFO, Italy, AUG. 31, 2008 (Zenit.org).- Taking up one's cross isn't an option, it's a mission all Christians are called to, says Benedict XVI.
APOSTLES: COLLABORATORS IN TRUE JOY
VATICAN CITY, 10 SEP 2008 (VIS) - At his general audience this morning, celebrated in the Paul VI Hall, the Pope dedicated his catechesis to St. Paul's view of the meaning of apostolate.
  The Pauline concept of apostleship went "beyond that of the group of Twelve" explained the Holy Father. "It was characterised by three elements: the first was the fact of having seen the Lord, in other words of having encountered Him in a way that marked his life. ... Definitively then, it is the Lord Who confers the apostolate, not individual presumption. Apostles do not make themselves but are created so by the Lord".
  The second characteristic is that of "having been sent. In fact, the Greek term 'apostolos' means envoy, ... the representative of a principal. ... Once again the idea emerges of an initiative arising from someone else, from God in Jesus Christ, to Whom one is duty-bound", of "a mission to be accomplished in His name, putting all personal interests aside".
  "Announcing the Gospel and the consequent founding of Churches" is the third requisite. "The tile of apostle", said Pope Benedict, "is not and cannot be a merely honorary title. It truly, even dramatically, involves the entire existence of the person concerned".
  St. Paul also defined apostles as "servants of God, Whose grace acts in them", said the Pope. "A typical element of the true apostle ... is a form of identification between the Gospel and the evangeliser, both share the same destiny. Indeed no-one so much as Paul highlighted how announcing the cross of Christ is a 'stumbling block and foolishness' to which many react with misunderstanding and refusal. That happened then and it should be no surprise that the same thing happens today".
  "With the stoical philosophy of his time, Paul shared the idea of tenacious perseverance in all the difficulties he had to face; but he went beyond the merely human perspective by recalling ... God's love and Christ's. ... This is the certainty, the profound joy that guided the Apostle though all those events: nothing can separate us from the love of God, and this love is the real treasure of human life".
  "As we may see, St. Paul gave himself to the Gospel with all his life", said the Holy Father in conclusion. "He undertook his ministry with faithfulness and joy that he 'might by all means save some'. And though aware of his own relationship of paternity - even, indeed, of maternity - towards the Churches, his attitude to them was one of complete service, declaring: "I do not mean to imply that we lord it over your faith; rather, we are workers with you for your joy'. This remains the mission of all the apostles of Christ in all times: to be collaborators of true joy".
AG/ST. PAUL/...VIS 080910 (480)

JOHN PAUL I  ANGELUS  Sunday, 10 September 1978
At Camp David, in America, Presidents Carter and Sadat and Prime Minister Begin are working for peace in the Middle East. All men are hungry and thirsty for peace, especially the poor, who pay more and suffer more in troubled times and in wars; for this reason they look to the Camp David meeting with interest and great hope. The Pope, too, has prayed, had prayers said, and is praying the Lord may deign to help the efforts of these politicians.

I was very favourably impressed by the fact that the three Presidents wished to express their hope in the Lord publicly in prayer. President Sadat's brothers in religion are accustomed to say as follows:
 "there is pitch darkness, a black stone and on the stone a little ant; but God sees it, and does not forget it".
President Carter, who is a fervent Christian, reads in the Gospel;
 "Knock, and it will be opened to you; ask, and it will be given you. Even the hairs of your head are all numbered."
And Premier Begin recalls that the Jewish people once passed difficult moments and addressed the Lord complaining and saying:
 "You have forsaken us, you have forgotten us!" "No!"—He replied through Isaiah the Prophet—"can a mother forget her own child? But even if it should happen, God will never forget his people".

Also we who are here have the same sentiments; we are the objects of undying love on the part of God. We know: he has always his eyes open on us, even when it seems to be dark. He is our father; even more he is our mother. He does not want to hurt us, He wants only to do good to us, to all of us.  If children are ill, they have additional claim to be loved by their mother. And we too, if by chance we are sick with badness, on the wrong track, have yet another claim to be loved by the Lord.

With these sentiments I invite you to pray together with the Pope for each of us, for the Middle East, for Iran, and for the whole world.  © Copyright 1978 - Libreria Editrice Vaticana

"Peace destroys nothing; War destroys everything" Paul VI
Paul VI_Athenagoras_05_01_1964
Quote: Pope Paul VI’s 1969 Instruction on the Contemplative Life includes this passage:  
 "To withdraw into the desert is for Christians tantamount to associating themselves more intimately with Christ’s passion, and it enables them, in a very special way, to share in the paschal mystery and in the passage of Our Lord from this world to the heavenly homeland" (#1). 

"The answers to many of life's questions can be found by reading the Lives of the Saints.
They teach us how to overcome obstacles and difficulties,
how to stand firm in our faith, and how to struggle against evil and emerge victorious." 

THE COMMEMORATION OF OUR LADY OF MOUNT CARMEL
THE patronal feast of the Carmelite Order was originally the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary on August 15; but between 1376 and 1386 the custom arose of observing a special feast of our Lady, to celebrate the approbation of their rule by Pope Honorius III in 1226. This custom appears to have originated in England; and the observance was fixed for July 16, which is also the date that, according to Carmelite tradition, our Lady appeared to St Simon Stock and gave him the scapular. At the beginning of the seventeenth century it became definitely the "scapular feast" and soon began to be observed outside the order, and in 1726 it was extended to the whole Western church by Pope Benedict XIII. In the proper of the Mass for the day no mention is made of the scapular or of St Simon's vision, but they are referred to in the lessons of the second nocturn at Matins; and our Lady's scapular is mentioned in the proper preface used by the Carmelites on this feast

Quote: Pope Paul VI’s 1969 Instruction on the Contemplative Life includes this passage:  
 "To withdraw into the desert is for Christians tantamount to associating themselves more intimately with Christ’s passion, and it enables them, in a very special way, to share in the paschal mystery and in the passage of Our Lord from this world to the heavenly homeland" (#1).

Benedict_XVI_Patriarch_Bartholomew

Jesus Christ is the blessing for every man and woman ... The Church, in giving us Jesus, offers us the fullness of the Lord’s blessing. This is precisely the mission of the people of God: to spread to all peoples God’s blessing made flesh in Jesus Christ. And Mary, the first and most perfect disciple of Jesus, the first and most perfect believer, the model of the pilgrim Church, is the one who opens the way to the Church’s motherhood and constantly sustains her maternal mission to all mankind. Mary’s tactful maternal witness has accompanied the Church from the beginning. She, the Mother of God, is also the Mother of the Church, and through the Church, the mother of all men and women, and of every people. …

Let us look to Mary, let us contemplate the Holy Mother of God. I suggest that you all greet her together, just like those courageous people of Ephesus, who cried out before their pastors when they entered Church: “Hail, Holy Mother of God!” What a beautiful greeting for our Mother. There is a story – I do not know if it is true – that some among those people had clubs in their hands, perhaps to make the Bishops understand what would happen if they did not have the courage to proclaim Mary “Mother of God”! I invite all of you, without clubs, to stand up and to greet her three times with this greeting of the early Church: “Hail, Holy Mother of God!”  Pope Francis; Homily, Holy Mass on the Solemnity of Mary, Mother of God

Chinese Catholics Celebrate Pentecost, World Day of Prayer for Church in China
Sacraments of Initiation Administered During Course of Celebrations
Hail, Holy Mother of God -- Pope Francis
By Staff Reporter
Rome, May 27, 2015 (ZENIT.org)

Many Chinese Catholic communities celebrated the World Day of Prayer for the Church in China last Sunday, reported Fides. Pope Benedict XVI instituted this day of prayer in 2007.

The May 24 prayer day coincides with the Marian feast day of Our Lady Help of Christians, and this year it coincided with the feast of Pentecost.  At the end of last Wednesday's General Audience in the Vatican, Pope Francis remembered the prayer day for the Asian nation.

In China on the prayer day, the sacraments of Christian initiation were administered to seven catechumans, 13 infants, and 38 adults in the He Bei province's parishes of Yan Jiao and of Bao Ding, as well as in the Zhe Jiang province's parish of Long Gang in the diocese of Wen Zhou.

The feast day of Our Lady Help of Christians is celebrated at the Shrine of Our Lady of Sheshan in Shanghai and on the day, the parish of Chang Shu in the diocese of Su Zhou, along with many other communities, prayed: "Let us pray for the Church in China, that faces major challenges in the life of the Church and society. Let us pray so that the Holy Spirit guides us ... and may Our Lady Help of Christians protect us."  Four infants were also baptized during Mass in Chang Shu.

Also to celebrate, the parish of Yi Shan in the Diocese of Wen Zhou in the province of Zhe Jiang held a solemn Marian procession, so that, as observers noted, "the Church is one and united and a witness of love."

Moreover, religious and some lay people of the diocese of Nan Chong, located in the southern province of Sichuan, went on a pilgrimage not only to celebrate the special feasts of Sunday, but also to celebrate the Year of Consecrated Life. During it, those partaking exchanged their experiences of vocation, faith, mission and pastoral activity.

Pope Francis called for the Year of Consecrated Life at the end of his meeting with 120 superior generals of male institutes last November. The year started on the First Sunday of Advent, the weekend of Nov. 29, 2014, and ends on Feb. 2, 2016, the World Day of Consecrated Life. (D.C.L.)


  Popes Html link here: 
 “Where there is no honor for the elderly, there is no future for young people.” Pope Francis:
It Is a Mortal Sin When Children Don't Visit Their Elderly Parents.
By Deborah Castellano Lubov VATICAN CITY, March 04, 2015 (Zenit.org) –

“Where there is no honor for the elderly, there is no future for young people.”
During his weekly General Audience in St. Peter’s Square, Pope Francis made this strong statement while continuing his catechesis on the family, with this and next week focusing on the elderly.  Confining this week’s address to their problematic current condition, the Holy Father said the elderly are ignored and that a society that does this is perverse.
While noting that life has been lengthened thanks to advances in medicine, he lamented that while the number of older people has multiplied, "our societies are not organized enough to make room for them, with proper respect and concrete consideration for their fragility and their dignity.”

“As long as we are young, we are led to ignore old age, as if it were a disease to be taken away. Then when we become older, especially if we are poor, sick and alone, we experience the shortcomings of a society planned on efficiency, which consequently ignores the elderly.”


He went on to quote his predecessor Pope Benedict XVI, who, when visiting a nursing home in November 2012, “used clear and prophetic words: ‘The quality of a society, I would say of a civilization, is judged also on how the elderly are treated and the place reserved for them in the common life.’"  Without a space for them, Francis highlighted, society dies.

Cultures, he decried, see the elderly as a burden who do not produce and should be discarded.
“You do not say it openly, but you do it!” he exclaimed. "Out of our fear of weakness and vulnerability, we do not tolerate and abandon the elderly," he said. “It’s sickening to see the elderly discarded. It is ugly. It’s a sin. Abandoning the elderly is a mortal sin.”
“Children who do not visit their elderly and ill parents have mortally sinned. Understand?”

The Pope expressed his dismay at children who go months without seeing a parent, or how elderly are confined to little tables in their kitchens alone, without anyone caring for them.  He noted that he observed this reality during his ministry in Buenos Aires.  Unwilling to accept limits, society, he noted, doesn’t allow elderly to participate and gives into the mentality that only the young can be useful and enjoy life.
The whole society must realize, the Pope said, the elderly contain the wisdom of the people.
The tradition of the Church, Pope Francis reaffirmed, has always supported a culture of closeness to the elderly, involving affectionately and supportively accompanying them in this final part of life.  The Church cannot, and does not want to, Francis underscored, comply with a mentality of impatience, and even less of indifference and contempt towards old age.
Sooner or later, we will all be old, he said. If we do not treat the elderly well, he stressed we will not be treated well either.
“We must awaken the collective sense of gratitude, of appreciation, of hospitality, which make them feel the elderly living part of his community.”

Concluding his address, Pope Francis noted how old age will come to all one day and reminded the faithful how much they have received from their elders. He also challenged them to not take a step back and abandon them to their fate.


The Church without Mary is an orphanage
 
Pope Francis:
“It is  very different to try and grow in the faith without Mary's help. It is something else. It is like growing in the faith, yes, but in a Church that is an orphanage. A Church without Mary is an orphanage. With Mary—she educates us, she makes us grow, she accompanies us, she touches consciences. She knows how to touch consciences, for repentance.”
Pope Francis Speech of October 25, 2014, to the Schönstatt Apostolic Movement
on the occasion of the 100th anniversary of its founding
.

 "Whatever you ask for in prayer, believe that you shall receive it, and it shall come to you. St. Mark 11:24"

Nazareth is the School of the Gospel (II)
It is first a lesson of silence.
May the esteem of silence be born in us anew, this admirable and indispensable condition of the spirit, in us who are assailed by so much clamor, noise and shouting in our modern life, so noisy and hyper sensitized. O silence of Nazareth, teach us recollection, interiority, disposition to listen to the good inspirations and words of the true masters; teach us the need and value of preparation, study, meditation, personal and interior life, and prayer that God alone sees in secret.

It is a lesson of family life.
May Nazareth teach us what a family is, with its communion of love, its austere and simple beauty, its sacred and inviolable character; let us learn from Nazareth how sweet and irreplaceable is the formation one receives within it; let us learn how primordial its role is on the social level.

It is a lesson of work. Nazareth, the house of the carpenter's son; it is there that we would like to understand and celebrate the severe and redeeming law of human labor; there, to reestablish the conscience of work's nobility; to remind people that working cannot be an end in itself, but that its freedom and nobility come, in addition to its economic value, from the value that finalize it; how we wish to salute here all the workers of the world and show them their great model, their divine brother, the prophet of all their just causes, Christ Our Lord.
Homily of Paul VI in Nazareth January 5, 1964

  Pope Francis: The Kingdom of God is found in silence, not in causing a spectacle (