Mary Mother of GOD
 Wednesday   Saints of this Day August  03 Tértio Nonas Augústi.   
Et álibi aliórum plurimórum sanctórum Mártyrum et Confessórum, atque sanctárum Vírginum.
And elsewhere in divers places, many other holy martyrs, confessors, and holy virgins.
 Пресвятая Богородице спаси нас!
   (Santíssima Mãe de Deus, salva-nos!)


CAUSES OF SAINTS

 Our Bartholomew Family Prayer List

Acts of the Apostles

Nine First Fridays Devotion to the Sacred Heart From the writings of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

How do I start the Five First Saturdays?

Mary Mother of GOD
15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary
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It Makes No Sense Not To Believe In GOD 
Every Christian must be a living book wherein one can read the teaching of the gospel
St. Ignatius Of Loyola founder of the Jesuits
 Wednesday   Saints of this Day August  03 Tértio Nonas Augústi.   
1868 ST PETER JULIAN EYMARD, FOUNDER of the priests of the Blessed Sacrement

THE PRECIOUS BLOOD OF OUR LORD JESUS CHRIST  
 50 St. Lydia Purpuraria Paul's first convert at Philippi
1st v. St. Abibas A convert to the faith 2nd son of Gamaliel famed Jewish teacher of St. Paul
45 St. Gamaliel Pharisee mentor of St. Paul great teachers of the Mosaic law 1st century counselled the Sanhedrin not to confute God's will by killing Peter and Apostles arrested for preaching Jesus
1st v. Nicodemus Sanhedrin spoke out on Jesus' behalf before the chief priests and the Pharisees
       St. Aspren Bishop cured and baptized by St. Peter
 304 ST Theodota, MARTYR
  415 The Finding Of St Stephe
  446 St. Dalmatius  Anti Nestorian An archimandrite a great ascetic and particularly excelled at fasting;  
484 Saint Razhden, a convert in Georgia, the Protomartyr descended from a noble Persian family

6th v. St Cosmas the Hermit; lived in Palestine Pharan wilderness strict fasting, firm defender of Orthodox Faith and dogmas, profoundly knowledgeable Holy Scripture works of the Church Fathers;
933 Blessed Gregory of Nonantula, Benedictine abbot the great Italian abbey of Nonantula near Modena
940 Benno of Metz; Strasbourg priest, hermit on Mount Etzel Switzerland where Saint Meinrad had lived; restored Mary shrine attracted disciples; German King named Benno bishop of Metz; blinded by enemies of his reforms; resigned see returned to Mount Etzel joined by Eberhard Strasbourg cathedral provost; hermitage developed into Einsiedeln Abbey monastery; long venerated a beatus
1105 St. Peter of Anagni 1st crusader Benedictine bishop papal legate
1160 St Waltneof, Abbot of Melrose; saw not the form of bread, but radiant form of the child Jesus.
1323 Blessed Augustine Gazotich of Lucera fought Manichæen heresy Sicily, Islam; in Hungary; miracles
1868 ST PETER JULIAN EYMARD, FOUNDER of the priests of the Blessed Sacrement

August 3 – Act of consecration to the Virgin Mary
inspired by St Peter Damian and approved by the Archbishop of Cambrai (France, 1626) 
 
"The soul must not say that it would like to suffer…"
 
Saint Mariam Baouardy of Jesus Crucified, a Palestinian Arab recently canonized by Pope Francis, was favored with many visions of Heaven. In one of these visions Our Lady gave this precious spiritual advice to Mariam:

"The soul must not say that it would like to suffer, or that it would like this or that cross, deprivation or humiliation, because self-will spoils everything. It is better to have fewer deprivations, less suffering and humiliations by the will of God, than a larger number by one’s own will. The key is to accept—with love and full compliance to his will—all that it pleases the Lord to send us."

"In hell there are souls that asked God for crosses and humiliations. God answered their prayers, but they did not take advantage of these graces and were lost through their pride. Give thanks and accept what God sends you,
without asking for anything else in particular. "
 
 Reverend Father Estrate
In Mariam, sainte palestinienne, la vie de Marie de Jésus crucifié, Editions Téqui, Paris

 
Pope Benedict XVI to The Catholic Church In China {whole article here }

The saints are a “cloud of witnesses over our head”,
showing us life of Christian perfection is possible.

15 Promises of the Virgin Mary to those who recite the Rosary

 50 St. Lydia Purpuraria Paul's first convert at Philippi
1st v. St. Abibas A convert to the faith 2nd son of Gamaliel famed Jewish teacher of St. Paul
45 St. Gamaliel Pharisee mentor of St. Paul great teachers of the Mosaic law 1st century counselled the Sanhedrin not to confute God's will by killing Peter and Apostles arrested for preaching Jesus
1st v. Nicodemus Sanhedrin spoke out on Jesus' behalf before the chief priests and the Pharisees "We know that you are a teacher come from God, for no one can do these signs that you do unless God is with him." Saint John even says that it was to Nicodemus that our Lord said, "God so loved the world that He gave His only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life."M (RM)


1868 ST PETER JULIAN EYMARD, Founder of Priests Of The Blessed Sacrament


August 3 – Our Lady of the Stairs to Heaven (Italy, 1498) – Feast of Saint Gamaliel and Saint Abibon 
 
Why does Mary bear the title of ‘Cooperatrix in the Redemption’?

Saint Bernard says, that as a man and a woman have co-operated for our ruin, so it was fit that another man and another woman should cooperate for our restoration; and these were Jesus and his Mother Mary.

Doubtless, says the saint, Jesus Christ alone was all-sufficient for our redemption: yet it was more fitting that each sex should take part in our redemption, when both took part in our corruption. For this reason blessed Albertus Magnus calls Mary the co-operatrix with Christ in our redemption: "Adjutrix Redemptionis."

And she herself revealed to Saint Bridget that as Adam and Eve sold the world for one apple, so her Son and herself with one heart redeemed the world. God could, indeed, as Saint Anselm asserts, create the world from nothing; but when it was lost by sin, he would not redeem it without the cooperation of Mary.

Saint Alphonsus of Liguori  The Glories of Mary, chapter 5, section II
 
August 4 – OUR LADY OF DORDRECHT (Holland) - Saint John Vianney, Curé of Ars (d. 1859)
The Marian Childhood of John Mary Vianney (I)
When John went out to the fields to herd his father’s sheep, he enjoyed kneading the clay-like soil into small statues of the Blessed Virgin and the saints as best he could. His sister told me that John had once made a fairly good statue of the Blessed Virgin. So they had it baked in a kiln and kept it in their home a long time.  Later, someone gave John a statuette of the Blessed Virgin as a gift and this made him very happy. He kept it close to him both day and night.
Catherine Lassagne in: Mgr. R. Fourrey, The Virgin Mary and the Curé of Ars

The Great Miracle of Our Lady Del Pilar August 3
 Our Lady of the Stairway to Heaven (Italy, 1498)
  In 1637, a youngster employed on a farm, Juan Miguel Pellicer (1617-1647), born in Calanda, Spain in a family of seven children, fell from a cart. A wheel broke his right leg, crushing "the tibia right down the middle" (Article 7 of Proceedings, quoted by Deroo, 1977, 24). 0He was admitted to a hospital in Valencia on August 3, 1637, and then transferred to the royal hospital in Zaragoza in early October. Reduced to begging, he tried different remedies in vain.
At the end of October, his leg was amputated "four fingers above the knee."
He left the hospital in the spring of 1638 and returned to live in Calanda, among his own.

The night of March 29, 1640, he slept in a room with his parents. In the morning, his father discovered two feet under the covers: the amputated leg had returned! A canonical trial began on June 5, 1640.
On April 22, 1641, the municipality of Calanda chose Our Lady of the Pilar as its patron saint.
 On April 27, Bishop Apaolaza, Archbishop of Zaragoza, declared: "We say, vote and declare that Juan Miguel Pellicer (...) has miraculously recovered his right leg which previously had been amputated.
This restitution is not the work of nature, but was carried out in a miraculous and admirable way
and should be recognized as a miracle."
(AASS, July, vol VI, 120 and Copia literal auténtica y del
Proceso y sentencia de calificacio'n, Zaragoza, 1940, 28.)

A medal to commemorate the miracle was struck in 1671.
Some associate this miracle to an apparition of the Blessed Virgin.
In actual fact, no evidence can lead us to believe this.
Juan Miguel had merely prayed to Our Lady of the Pilar before going to bed and then he "had a dream in which he saw the Blessed Virgin rubbing his sore stump with oil from the lamps in the chapel of Saragossa."
Taken from Father Laurentin's Dictionnaire des Apparitions, Fayard 2007


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Aug 3 - Our Lady of Bows (London, England) - Saint Gamaliel and Saint Abibon
Mary's Resting Place (I)
Twenty miles west of Jerusalem, near the convent of the Sisters of Bethlehem, Beit Gemal (the house of Gamaliel) the Salesian church keeps the memory of the apparition of the great rabbi Gamaliel to Fr. Lucien, a priest from Cafargamala on Friday, August 3, 415, at three o'clock A.M.

Falling into a kind of ecstasy, Fr. Lucien saw a very old man, of great stature and full of dignity, with white hair and a long beard, wearing a shield decorated with gold tassels and a cross in the middle, holding a gold crosier in his hand, who said, "Lucien, Lucien, Lucien, go to the city of Aelia, which is none other than Jerusalem, and tell the old holy man John, the bishop these words:
8/2/09
"How long will we remain imprisoned without anyone to open the door for us? It is under your bishopric that we should to be revealed. Quickly open the tomb where our relics were carelessly laid, so that God may open the door of his clemency to the world before its many, daily faults put it in danger."
 50 St. Lydia Purpuraria Paul's first convert at Philippi
1st v. St. Abibas A convert to the faith 2nd son of Gamaliel famed Jewish teacher of St. Paul
45 St. Gamaliel Pharisee mentor of St. Paul great teachers of the Mosaic law 1st century counselled the Sanhedrin not to confute God's will by killing Peter and Apostles arrested for preaching Jesus
1st v. Nicodemus Sanhedrin spoke out on Jesus' behalf before the chief priests and the Pharisees "We know that you are a teacher come from God, for no one can do these signs that you do unless God is with him." Saint John even says that it was to Nicodemus that our Lord said, "God so loved the world that He gave His only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life."M (RM)
       St. Aspren Bishop cured and baptized by St. Peter
 304 ST Theodota, MARTYR
  415 The Finding Of St Stephe
  446 St. Dalmatius { Dalmatus )Anti Nestorian An archimandrite a great ascetic and particularly excelled at fasting; a zealous proponent of the Orthodox Faith at the Third Ecumenical Council at Ephesus (431), which condemned the heresy of Nestorius venerated in Constantinople; a staunch defender of the Church against the heretical Nestorians.
5th v. Trea of Ardtree conversion to Christianity by Saint Patrick recluse at ArdtreeV (AC)
  448 St Germanus, Bishop Of Auxerre; by his teaching and miracles Pelagianism was finally eradicated and its teachers banished, free from heresy the Church in these islands remained for a space of eleven hundred years, until the errors of Protestantism took root and were watered by royal corruption in the sixteenth century;  feast observed in Wales and in several southern English dioceses; he was strengthening and consolidating the British church after abandoned by the Roman empire, of purging it from error, of converting yet more of the people; and by his influence on St Patrick; no doubt Germanus left his mark on Ireland also
  450 St. Faustus A monk of considerable fame, reportedly the son of St. Dalmatius.
475 Euphronius of Autun extant letter (Patrologia Latina col. 66-67) from Bishop Saint Euphronius of Autun to Saint Lupus of Troyes B (RM)

 484 Saint Razhden, a convert in Georgia, the Protomartyr descended from a noble Persian family
5th v. Marana and Cyra two maidens who became hermits near Beroea, Syria MM (RM)
         
St. Senach Finian 6th century disciple of Saint Finnian and his successor at Clonard
6th v. St Cosmas the Hermit; lived in the Pharan wilderness of Palestine; strict of fasting, firm defender of the Orthodox Faith and Church dogmas, profoundly knowledgeable in Holy Scripture and works of the Church Fathers;
Mancus (Manaccus) is the titular patron of Lanreath church in Cornwall, where, according to William Worcestre, his relics were venerated; image appears in 16th-century Young Women's Window Saint Neot's Church in Cornwall
933 Blessed Gregory of Nonantula, OSB Abbot A Benedictine abbot of the great Italian abbey of Nonantula near Modena (Benedictines).(AC)
  940 Benno of Metz; left noble family became Strasbourg priest, hermit on Mount Etzel Switzerland where Saint Meinrad had lived; restored Mary shrine attracted disciples; German King named Benno bishop of Metz; blinded by enemies of his reforms; resigned see returned to Mount Etzel joined by Eberhard Strasbourg cathedral provost; hermitage developed into Einsiedeln Abbey monastery; long venerated a beatus
1105 St. Peter of Anagni 1st crusader Benedictine bishop papal legate
1147 St Anthony the Roman Born to rich parents adhered to Orthodox Faith; raised him in piety; study of the Fathers in the Greek language; distributed part inheritance to poor, other portion he put into a wooden barrel and threw it
into the sea; Persecution of the Latins against the  Orthodox forced the brethren to separate; a terrible storm tor 
away the stone on which St Anthony stood, and threw it into the sea; divine Providence floated the stone to
Novgorod { the Novgorod Chronicles};  fishermen recovered barrel was returned used money for monastery
1160 Bl. Waltheof Cistercian abbot  undaunted cheerfulness  humility, simplicity, and kindness  unbounded generosity
incorrupt Many miracles recorded during lifetime Eucharistic visions of Christ in the form appropriate to feast 
of Christmas, Passiontide, Easter, visions of heaven and hell
1160 St Waltneof, Abbot of Melrose; Waltheof saw in his hands, not the form of bread, but the radiant form of the child Jesus. When he had laid the Host on the altar he saw only the sacramental form.
1295 “ST” THOMAS OF DOVER Miracles were recorded at his tomb and Simon Simeon, an Irish friar who made a pilgrimage to the Holy Land about 1322, mentions the honour given to him as a martyr “at the Black Monks, under Dover Castle”. King Richard II asked Pope Urban VI to canonize Thomas, and a process was begun in 1382 but never carried out
1323 Blessed Augustine Gazotich of Lucera fought the Manichæen heresy; in Sicily, Islam; in Hungary charming miracles are related OP B (AC)
1625 Marabda 9,000 Martyrs; On the Feast of the Annunciation the Georgians annihilated army of the Persian shah Abbas I Battle of Martqopi. The victory unified Georgia’s eastern provinces of Kartli and Kakheti. It instilled hope in other Transcaucasus enslaved peoples, rebellions began to break out everywhere; another battle had begun at dawn finally ended late night with the defeat of the Georgian army. 9,000 Georgians died for Christ and their motherland on the battlefield at Marabda
1868 ST PETER JULIAN EYMARD, FOUNDER OF THE PRIESTS OF THE BLESSED SACRAMENT


50 St. Lydia Purpuraria Paul's first convert at Philippi
Philíppis, in Macedónia, sanctæ Lydiæ purpuráriæ, quæ, prædicánte ibídem sancto Paulo Apóstolo, ut beátus Lucas in Actibus Apostolórum refert, ómnium prima crédidit Evangélio.
    At Philippi in Macedonia, St. Lydia, a dealer in purple, who was the first to believe in the Gospel when the apostle St. Paul preached in that city, as is related by St. Luke in the Acts of the Apostles
Lydia Purpuraria (1st century) was born at Thyatira (Ak-Hissar), a town in Asia Minor, famous for its dye works, (hence, her name which means purple seller). She became Paul's first convert at Philippi. She was baptized with her household, and Paul stayed at her home there.
Lydia Purpuraria, Matron (RM) Born at Thyatira (Ak-Hissar) in Asia Minor, 1st century. Saint Lydia was born in a town famous for its dye works. She was a seller of purple dye, when she became Saint Paul's first convert at Philippi (Acts 16:14-15), Macedonia, and in Europe. She and her entire household were baptized, which probably included young children. Thereafter, Paul made his home with her while in Philippi (Benedictines, Delaney, Encyclopedia)
.
1st v. St. Abibas A convert to the faith 2nd son of Gamaliel famed Jewish teacher of St. Paul
Gamaliel was a member of the Sanhedrin that tried Jesus and condemned him to death. Gamaliel is recorded as having become a Christian, and Abibas is traditionally listed as an early convert to the Church. Little else is known of his life.

Abibas (Abibo) (RM). Abibas, the second son of Gamaliel (Acts 5:34; 22:3), converted to Christianity like his father and father's disciple, Saint Paul. He seems to have escaped the destruction of Jerusalem and lived until he was 80. In 415, his remains, together with  Saints Stephen, Gamaliel, and Nicodemus, found at Capergamela near Jerusalem (Benedictines, Encyclopedia)
.
St. Aspren Bishop cured and baptized by St. Peter
Neápoli, in Campánia, sancti Aspréni Epíscopi, qui a sancto Petro Apóstolo, curátus ab infirmitáte ac deínde baptizátus, ejúsdem civitátis Epíscopus ordinátus fuit.
    At Naples in Campania, St. Aspren, bishop, who was cured of a sickness by the apostle St. Peter, and after being baptized, was made bishop of that city.
Aspren was a native of Naples, in Campania, Italy. He became ill and was cured by St. Peter. Baptized and a vital member of the Church in Naples, Aspren was made bishop of the city.
Aspren (Aspronas) of Naples B (RM). The Roman Martyrology contains this laus: At Naples in Campania, the birthday of Saint Aspren the bishop, who was cured of infirmity by Saint Peter the Apostle, and afterwards baptized and ordained bishop of that city." The historical records, however, indicate that he probably lived at the end of 2nd beginning 3rd century (Benedictines)
.
45 St. Gamaliel Pharisee mentor of St. Paul great teachers of the Mosaic law 1st century counselled the Sanhedrin not to confute God's will by killing Peter and Apostles arrested for preaching Jesus
Rabbinical teacher, the mentor of St. Paul. Gamaliel counseled the Jewish Sanhedrin in Jerusalem to release St. Peter and other apostles. He reportedly became a Christian; finding of his body in Jerusalem was celebrated on August 3 by early Christians.

Gamaliel (RM) 1st century. One of the great teachers of the Mosaic law, Gamaliel is honored in rabbinical circles with the title Rabban. He was the Pharisee who taught Saint Paul the law in Jerusalem (Acts 22:3). Gamaliel was also the one who counselled the Sanhedrin not to confute God's will by surreptitiously killing Peter and the Apostles who had been arrested for preaching Jesus. His eloquent speech caused that body to release Peter and the apostles with only a flogging (Acts 5:34-41). According to an ancient tradition recorded by Saint John Chrysostom, Gamaliel became a Christian even before Saint Paul.
He witnessed the martyrdom of Saint Stephen and buried the protomartyr's body on his own estate about 20 miles outside Jerusalem. At his own death, Gamaliel was buried in the same sepulchre, where the relics of both were found, together with those of his son, Saint Abibas and Saint Nicodemus, in 415 following a vision by Lucian, as recorded in the Roman Martyrology (Benedictines, Delaney, Husenbeth)
.
1st v. Nicodemus Sanhedrin spoke out on Jesus' behalf before the chief priests and the Pharisees "We know that you are a teacher come from God, for no one can do these signs that you do unless God is with him." Saint John even says that it was to Nicodemus that our Lord said, "God so loved the world that He gave His only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life."M (RM)
1st century. The Sanhedrin, the supreme council and highest court of justice of the Jews in Jerusalem, had wanted to condemn Jesus. Any member of the Sanhedrin who showed sympathy towards Jesus would have been considered by his colleagues as a traitor and an outcast. Yet we know that at least one member, Nicodemus, did.
Even before Jesus was tried, Saint John tells us that Nicodemus came to see Jesus, secretly and at night, to talk to him about what it means to see the kingdom of God (John 3). On this occasion Nicodemus partly confessed his belief in Jesus, saying: "We know that you are a teacher come from God, for no one can do these signs that you do unless God is with him." Jesus tried to teach him about being born again by the Holy Spirit and by baptism. Saint John even says that it was to Nicodemus that our Lord said, "God so loved the world that He gave His only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life."

Nicodemus spoke out on Jesus' behalf before the chief priests and the Pharisees, pointing out to them that the Law demanded the accused be given a hearing before judgment was passed (John 7:50- 52).

Together with Saint Joseph of Arimathea, he had the privilege of laying Jesus' body in the tomb on Good Friday. He brought with him large quantities of costly myrrh and aloes to the tomb and with Joseph wrapped Jesus' body "with spices in linen cloth" (John 1939-42).

One of the apocryphal gospels was circulated under his name in the early centuries of the Church. Saint Nicodemus has always been venerated as a martyr, although nothing is mentioned about his conversion or martyrdom in the New Testament (Benedictines, Bentley, Delaney)
.

304 ST Theodota, MARTYR

ST THEODOTA, named in the Roman Martyrology on this day, was a noble lady of Nicaea. According to the acta, which are of no value, she was sought in marriage by the prefect Leucatius, and when she refused to have anything to do with him he denounced her and her three children to Nicetius, proconsul in Bithynia, as Christians. It was at the time of the persecution of Diocletian, and when they were brought before Nicetius he asked Theodota if it were she who had taught her children the new-fangled impiety which they believed. She retorted that they had been taught nothing new, but rather the age-old law. “What” asked her questioner, “Did your ancestors know these doctrines?” At this the eldest boy, Evodius, spoke up and said, “If our ancestors have been in error it is not because God has hidden the truth from them. Rather they were blind, and wandered into untruth through their blindness. But we are going to follow our mother.” “Your mother is going to sacrifice to the gods, whether she likes it or not”, replied Nicetius, and then, blaming Theodota for the offensive candour of her son’s words, urged her to sacrifice that they might follow her example and be saved. But when he could in no way move either her or them, he ordered them all to be burned together. Which was done.

Although the so-called “acts”, both in the Greek and Latin recensions, are worthless, there is good reason to believe that the martyrdom of St Theodota at Nicaea with her three sons is an authentic fact. “The sons of Theodota” are mentioned in the Syriac “breviarium” at the beginning of the fifth century, and it is probable that September 2, the date there assigned them, is the true anniversary, though in the “Hieronymianum”, from which our Roman Martyrology derives, August 2 has been erroneously indicated.

See H. Delehaye, CMH., pp. 412—414, and again in Analecta Bollandiana, vol. Iv (1937), pp. 201 seq.
415 The Finding Of St Stephen
Hierosólymis Invéntio beatíssimi Stéphani Protomártyris, et sanctórum Gamaliélis, Nicodémi et Abibónis, sicut Luciáno Presbytero divínitus revelátum est, Honórii Príncipis témpore.
    At Jerusalem, the finding of the body of blessed Stephen, protomartyr, and of the Saints Gamaliel, Nicodemus, and Abibo, through a divine revelation made to the priest Lucian, in the time of Emperor Honorius.
   This second festival in honour of the protomartyr St Stephen was instituted by the Church to commemorate discovery by the priest Lucian of his relics, together with those of Gamaliel, Nicodemus and Abibo, at Kafr Gamala in Palestine December 415.  According to the narrative attributed to Lucian, this discovery was made in consequence of dreams or visions vouchsafed to himself and to the monk Migetius.
  Alban Butler narrates the occurrence in some detail, which is not reproduced here; for it adds nothing to our knowledge of St Stephen, and moreover scholars increasingly incline to the view that there was no supernatural revelation made to Lucian or Migetiu.  Father Delebaye and others suggest that the discovery was accidental, but that a few years afterwards the incident was "dramatized" by Lucian in accord with the hagiographical precedents of that age.
  The wide distribution of relics of the martyr that followed the finding at Kafr Gamala had a great influence, directly and indirectly, on the spread of the cult of St Stephen.  God was pleased to glorify His name by miracles wrought through their means and the intercession of His first martyr.  Many of them were described by Evodius, Bishop of Uzalum in Africa, and by St Augustine, who said of them to his flock, "Let us so desire to obtain temporal blessings by his intercession, that we may by imitating him deserve those which are eternal".
   Our corporal necessities were not the motive which drew our divine Physician down from Heaven; but in His mortal life He restored many sick to health and delivered demoniacs, to relieve distress, to give men sensible proof of His divine power, and as a sign that He came to relieve spiritual disease.
In a Moto Proprio of John XXIII dated July 25, 1960, this feast was dropped from the Roman Calendar.
The most trustworthy text of Lucian's narrative is the Latin translation by Avitus, which is printed, for example, in the works of St Augustine (see Migne, PL., voL xli, cc. 805-816), but there are also versions in Greek, Syria; Armenian and Old Slavonic. The story of the discovery of the relics as narrated by Lucian, and its bearing upon certain traditional sites in Jerusalem, led in the years 1900-1908 to a good deal of lively controversy.  For this see especially the Revue de l'Orient chrétien, t. xxx, and the article of Fr Peeters in the Analecta Bollandiana, vol. xxvii (1908), pp. 359-368.  See also F. M. Abel, La legende apocrypha de S. Etienne (1931), and H. Delehaye, Origines du culte des martyrs (1933), pp. 80-82.  Upon the miracles at Uzalum, etc., see the same writer in the Analecta Bollandiana, vol. xliii (1925), pp. 74-85, and upon the fact that the "inventio F. Stephani" is commemorated on August 3, see the Analecta Bollandiana, vol. xlix (1931), pp. 22-30.  A very full article on the "inventio", with copious references, has been contributed by H. Leclercq to DAC., vol. v, cc. 624-671. Pope Benedict XIV's commission proposed to suppress this feast.
446 St. Dalmatius { Dalmatus )Anti Nestorian An archimandrite a great ascetic and particularly excelled at fasting; a zealous proponent of the Orthodox Faith at the Third Ecumenical Council at Ephesus (431), which condemned the heresy of Nestorius venerated in Constantinople. He was a staunch defender of the Church against the heretical Nestorians.

dalmatus_isaac_.faustus.jpg
Saint Dalmatus had served in the army of the holy emperor Theodosius the Great (379-395) and gained his notice. He left the world somewhere between the years 381-383, and went with his son Faustus to the monastery of St Isaac near Constantinople. St Isaac (May 30) tonsured father and son into monasticism, and they both began to lead a strict ascetic life.  Once during Great Lent St Dalmatus did not eat any food for the forty days. Later he regained his strength and was found worthy of a divine vision.
When St Isaac was approaching the end of his earthly life, he named St Dalmatus as igumen of the monastery, which later became known as the Dalmatian Monastery.  St Dalmatus showed himself a zealous proponent of the Orthodox Faith at the Third Ecumenical Council at Ephesus (431), which condemned the heresy of Nestorius.  After the Council the holy Fathers elevated St Dalmatus as archimandrite of the Dalmatian monastery, where he died at the age of ninety (after 446).
St Faustus, like his father, was a great ascetic and particularly excelled at fasting. After the death of his father, Faustus became igumen of the monastery .
448 St Germanus, Bishop Of Auxerre; by his teaching and miracles Pelagianism was finally eradicated and its teachers banished, free from heresy the Church in these islands remained for a space of eleven hundred years, until the errors of Protestantism took root and were watered by royal corruption in the sixteenth century;  feast observed in Wales and in several southern English dioceses; he was strengthening and consolidating the British church after abandoned by the Roman empire, of purging it from error, of converting yet more of the people; and by his influence on St Patrick; no doubt Germanus left his mark on Ireland also.  The feast of St Germanus is August 3 in Wales and other dates in Westminster, Plymouth and Portsmouth.  His day in the Roman Martyrology is July 31.
It is very fitting that the feast of St Gerrnanus (Germain) of Auxerre should be observed in Wales and in several southern English dioceses for, while there is no saint who can be venerated as the apostle of Britain, to him belongs the honour of strengthening and consolidating the British church after the country was abandoned by the Roman empire, of purging it from error, and of converting yet more of the people; and by his influence on St Patrick no doubt Germanus left his mark on Ireland also.   But there was nothing in his youth and early manhood to suggest the future that was before him.

  He was born at Auxerre of Christian parents, and attended the Gallic schools then he went to Rome, read law and studied eloquence there, and practised at the bar, as we should say, with succcss.  He married-his wife was named Eustochia -and was sent back to Gaul as dux of the Armorican border provinces.  Germanus was a capable governor, and on the death of St Amator in 418 he was chosen, much against his will, to succeed him as bishop of Auxerre.  This sudden change of state imbued him with a deep sense of the obligations of his new dignity (cf. St Amator on May I). He renounced all worldliness, and embraced a life of poverty austerity. He extended his hospitality to all sorts of persons, washed the feet of the poor and served them with his own hands, while he himself fasted.   He built a monastery near Auxerre, on the other side of the river Yonne, in honour of SS. Cosmas and Damian, and endowed the cathedral and other churches of Auxerre, which he found very poor.
  At this time the British church was troubled by the heresy of Pelagius. This man was himself a Briton, and he, teaching in Rome, rejected the doctrine of original sin and denied that grace is necessary for salvation.  One of his disciples, Agricola, had propagated this false teaching in Britain, and the bishops of Gaul were asked to deal with the trouble.  Pope St Celestine and the Gallic bishops nominated St Germanus to go in year 429, and appointed St Lupus, Bishop of Troyes, to accompany him on this mission.
   The bishops arrived in Britain after a rough passage, and the fame of their sanctity, doctrine and miracles soon spread abroad.  They confirmed the orthodox and converted heretics, preaching wherever people would listen.  A public disputation was held at some unnamed place, where the heretics were allowed to speak first. When they had talked a long time, the bishops answered them with great eloquence, and so supported their arguments with quotations from the Bible and the fathers that their adversaries were reduced to silence. The saints went from this conference to return thanks to God at the tomb of St Alban, and ask for smooth passage home. St Germanus caused his sepulchre to be opened, and put therein his box of relics (with which he had just cured a little blind girl), taking out a little of the dust of St Alban.  This he carried away with him, and at his return built at Auxerre a church in his honour.  St Germanus found his people burdened with excessive taxes and went to Arles to appeal to Auxiliaris, prefect of Gaul, on their behalf.   On the road the people everywhere met him in crowds to receive his blessing.  In consequence of the bishop's healing of his sick wife, Auxiliaris granted Germanus the discharge from the taxes which he had asked for his people.
  About 440 he was called again into Britain to assist that church against Pelagianism, which was again gaining ground.
He sought out those who had been seduced by the heretics, and converted many of them; so that by his teaching and miracles Pelagianism was finally eradicated and its teachers banished.  Germanus knew that ignorance could not be banished, nor the reformation which he had established maintain its ground, without schools for the instruction of the clergy, and is said himself to have founded such institutions, by which means, "These churches continued afterward pure in the faith, and free from heresy", as Bede observes. But for the slight and passing success of Wiclif, free from heresy the Church in these islands remained for 11 hundred years, until errors of Protestantism took root and watered by royal corruption in the 16 thcentury.
    In the proper Mass of St Germanus formerly used in the diocese of Paris, the offertory verse was taken from the Apocalypse xix I, 3:  "I heard as it were the voice of much people in Heaven, saying, Alleluia.  And again they said, Alleluia."
This had reference to an incident recorded by Germanus's biographer Constantius.  During his first visit to Britain, a plundering expedition of Picts and Saxons descended on the country, and the Britons, having assembled an army, invited the bishop into their camp, hoping to be protected by his prayers and presence.  The saint agreed, and employed his time in bringing idolaters to faith, and the Christians to penance.  Many demanded baptism, and they were prepared to receive it at Easter, for it was then Lent.   They made a church in the camp, of green boughs twisted together, in which the catechumens received the sacrament of regeneration, and the whole army celebrated the festival with great devotion. After Easter, St Germanus had recourse to a stratagem by which, without bloodshed, he rescued his friends from the danger with which they were threatened.  He led the little army into a vale between two high mountains; when warned of the enemy's approach, ordered his troops to send forth the same shout for which he would give them a sign. When the Saxons came near, he cried out thrice, Alleluia! which was repeated by the whole British force, and the sound was carried on by the echo from the hills with an awe-inspiring noise.  The barbarians, judging from the shout that they were falling upon the swords of a mighty army, flung down their arms and ran away. According to tradition this "battle" took place near Mold, in Flintshire, where is a meadow called Maes Garmon, though the association is very dubious indeed: other suggested localizations are near the south-east coast (Dr Hugh Williams) and the Chiltern escarpment (R. H. Hodgkin).
  To quell a revolt in Armorica, the Roman general Aetius sent a force of barbarians under their chief Goar, and Germanus, fearing for the people in the hands of such savages, went out to meet Gear, stopping his horse by the bridle, at the head of his army.   He at first refused to hear the bishop, but Germanus was firm, and Goar agreed not to ravish the province until the matter had been referred to Aetius, who in turn said that Germanus must get the imperial pardon for the people. He therefore undertook a journey to Ravenna.  His fame went before him like a triumphal progress, so that he entered the city by night to avoid a public reception.  He was received with joy by the bishop, St Peter Chrysologus, by the young Emperor Valentinian III, and by his mother, Galla Placidia; but unhappily for the cause which had brought Germanus there, news came of a further revolt among the Armoricans.
  The last great act of charity of his life was done, for while still at Ravenna, God took him, on July 31, 448. The transport of his body to Auxerre was one of the most magnificent funerals of which there is record, and his shrine in the great abbey church of his name at Auxerre was a famous place of pilgrimage.
  Saint Germans in Cornwall takes its name from this saint, who in a ninth- or tenth-century sacramentary is referred to as "a preacher of the truth and the light and pillar of Cornwall".  A medieval legend associates the foundation of the great abbey of Selby with a vision of St Germanus to the monk Benedict, with many marvels added.

The critical edition published by W. Levison in 1920 of Constantius's Vita S. Germani renders the older texts, such as that in the Acta Sanctorum, July, vol. vii, to some extent out of date. Like so many of the other biographies edited in MGH., Scriptores Merov. (vol. vii, pp. 225-283), the older text is now shown to have been considerably interpolated. Still the substance remains, and it cannot be disputed that Constantius wrote within thirty years of the death of the saint. See also Levison's "Bischof Germanus von Auxerre" in Neues Archiv, vol. xxix (1904); and, for a good popular work, L. Prunel's book in the series "Les Saints "(1929).  The meeting of the Association Bourguignonne des Sociétés Savantes held at Auxerre in 1948 produced a volume of studies, St Germain d'Auxerre et son temps, of great value. Baring-Gould and Fisher's hypothesis (LBS., vol. iii, pp. 60-79) of a separate St Germanus, "of Man", giving his name to Saint Germains on that island and other British churches, cannot be accepted without many reserves: see Analecta Bollandiana, vol. xxiii (1904), p. 356 and J. Loth in the Annales de Bretagne, vol. xx (1905), p. 351.  The vita by Constantius is translated in F. R. Hoare, The Western Fathers (1954).  The feast of St Germanus is August 3 in Wales and other dates in Westminster, Plymouth and Portsmouth.  His day in the Roman Martyrology is July 31.
450 St. Trea Patrick Irish hermitess convert to Christianity through St. Patrick efforts
A convert to Christianity through the efforts of St. Patrick, she embraced the eremitical life and lived out her days as a recluse at Ardtree, Derry, Ireland
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450 St. Faustus A monk of considerable fame, reportedly the son of St. Dalmatius.
5th v. Marana and Cyra two maidens who became hermits near Beroea, Syria MM (RM)
Berœæ, in Syria, sanctárum mulíerum Maránæ et Cyræ.    At Beroea in Syria, the holy women Marana and Cyra.
5th century. Saints Marana and Cyra were two maidens who became hermits near Beroea, Syria. They are said to have kept holy silence throughout the year, except on Whitsunday (Benedictines). In art, this duo is depicted as two female hermits in mantles and hoods with chains on their shoulders (Roeder).
484 Saint Razhden, a convert in Georgia, the Protomartyr descended from a noble Persian family
When Holy King Vakhtang Gorgasali married the daughter of the Persian king Hormuzd III Balunducht, the queen took Razhden with her to Georgia. In Kartli Razhden converted to the Christian Faith, and King Vakhtang presented him with an estate and appointed him as a military adviser and commander.
At that time Georgia was under heavy political pressure from Persia. Enraged at King Vakhtang’s clearly Christian convictions, the Persian king Peroz (Son of Yazgard III.)(457–484) attacked Georgia with an enormous army. His accomplishments in this battle earned Razhden his distinction as a brave and virtuous warrior.
Before long the furious King Peroz ordered that “a certain Persian aristocrat who had converted to Christianity and survived the battle” be taken captive. The Persians surrounded Razhden, bound his hands and feet, and delivered him to their king. Peroz received him with feigned tenderness, saying, “Greetings, my virtuous Razhden! Peace be to you! Where have you been all this time, and for what reason have you turned from the faith of your fathers to confess a creed in which your fathers did not instruct you?”

Razhden fearlessly asserted Christianity the only true faith Christ the only true Savior of mankind.

King Peroz tried to conceal his anger and cunningly lure Razhden to his side, but his attempt was in vain. Convinced that his efforts were futile, Peroz finally ordered that the saint be beaten without mercy. The expert executioners trampled St. Razhden, battered him, knocked out his teeth, dragged him across jagged cliffs, then chained him in heavy irons and cast him into prison.
When the news of Razhden’s suffering and captivity spread to Mtskheta, the Georgian nobility came to Peroz and requested that he free the holy man. Peroz consented to their request, but made Razhden vow to return.
Razhden arrived in Mtskheta, bid farewell to his family and the beloved king Vakhtang Gorgasali and, despite his loved ones’ admonitions to the contrary, returned to Peroz.
The Persian king tried again to return Razhden to the religion of the fire-worshippers. But seeing that he would not be broken, Peroz instead ordered his exile to a military camp at Tsromi in central Georgia. Then he secretly ordered the chief of the Persian camp to turn him away from Christianity and to execute him if he refused.
“Your flattery and bribes are insulting to me. With joy I am prepared to endure every suffering for the sake of Christ!”
Razhden replied to his appeals.
“If he hopes in the Crucified One, then he also is fit to suffer crucifixion!”
Such was the Persians’ verdict. They erected a cross, crucified Christ’s humble servant, and prepared to shoot at the pious man with bow and arrow. “Into Thy hands, O Lord, I commit my spirit!” were the last words of St. Razhden.
That night a group of Christians stole the Persians’ cross, took the holy martyr’s body down from it, and buried his holy relics in secret. A few years later Vakhtang Gorgasali translated St. Razhden’s relics from Tsromi to Nikozi (in central Georgia) and interred them in a cathedral that he had built there not long before. Holy King Vakhtang later erected churches in honor of Georgia’s first martyr in Ujarma and Samgori in eastern Georgia

475 Euphronius of Autun extant letter (Patrologia Latina col. 66-67) from Bishop Saint Euphronius of Autun to Saint Lupus of Troyes B (RM)
Augustodúni deposítio sancti Euphrónii, Epíscopi et Confessóris.
    At Autun, the death of St. Euphronius, bishop and confessor.
There is an extant letter (Patrologia Latina col. 66-67) from Bishop Saint Euphronius of Autun to his friend Saint Lupus of Troyes (Benedictines).
550 St. Senach Finian 6th century disciple of Saint Finnian and his successor at Clonard
A disciple of St. Finian. He became a bishop in Ireland and succeeded Finian as head of the great Irish school of Clonard.
Senach (Snach) of Clonard B (AC) 6th century. A disciple of Saint Finnian and his successor at Clonard (Benedictines).

5th v. Trea of Ardtree conversion to Christianity by Saint Patrick recluse at ArdtreeV (AC)
5th century. After her conversion to Christianity by Saint Patrick, Saint Trea became a recluse at Ardtree in Derry, Ireland (Benedictines)
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6th v. St Cosmas the Hermit lived in the Pharan wilderness of Palestine; strict of fasting, a firm defender of the Orthodox Faith and Church dogmas, and profoundly knowledgeable in Holy Scripture and the works of the Church Fathers;
An account of the Bikaneia presbyter Abba Basil about St Cosmas is located in the book Spiritual Meadow (Ch. 40) compiled by St John Moschus. He was strict of fasting, a firm defender of the Orthodox Faith and Church dogmas, and profoundly knowledgeable in Holy Scripture and the works of the Church Fathers.  St Cosmas particularly revered the works of St Athanasius the Great and told those to whom he spoke:  "If you come across a word of St Athanasius and have no paper, write it upon your clothing."  He had the habit to stand at prayer all night Saturday through Sunday.  Having once come to Antioch, he died there, and the patriarch buried his body at his monastery. Abba Basil relates that when he came to venerate the grave of St Cosmas, he found there a beggar, who told him:  "It is a great Elder whom you have buried here!" He explained that he had been paralyzed for twelve years, and received healing through the prayers of St Cosmas.
Mancus (Manaccus) is the titular patron of Lanreath church in Cornwall, where, according to William Worcestre, his relics were venerated. His image appears in the 16th-century Young Women's Window at Saint Neot's Church in Cornwall (Farmer). (AC).
933 Blessed Gregory of Nonantula, OSB Abbot A Benedictine abbot of the great Italian abbey of Nonantula near Modena (Benedictines).(AC)
940 (Blessed) Benno of Metz; left noble family became Strasbourg priest, hermit on Mount Etzel Switzerland where Saint Meinrad had lived; restored Mary shrine attracted disciples; German King named Benno bishop of Metz in opposition to a locally candidate; blinded by enemies of his reforms; resigned his see returned to Mount Etzel joined by Eberhard Strasbourg cathedral provost; hermitage was developed into a monastery became Einsiedeln Abbey; long venerated a beatus OSB B (AC)
Born in Schwabia (Germany); died August 3. Benno left his noble family to become a priest at Strasbourg and, in 906, a hermit on Mount Etzel in the canton of Schwyz, Switzerland. He occupied the hermitage in which Saint Meinrad had lived, restored a shrine to Mary, and soon attracted disciples. In 927, the German King Henry the Fowler named Benno bishop of Metz in opposition to a locally elected candidate. Striving to remedy abuses, two years later he was blinded by the enemies his reforms and the method of his appointment had made. He resigned his see and returned to Mount Etzel, where he was joined in 934 by Eberhard, provost of Strasbourg cathedral, and Benno's hermitage was developed into a monastery that in time became the famous Einsiedeln Abbey. He has long been venerated as both a beatus and a saint, although his cultus has never been recognized formally (Benedictines, Delaney)
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1160 St Waltneof, Abbot of Melrose; Waltheof saw in his hands, not the form of bread, but the radiant form of the child Jesus. When he had laid the Host on the altar he saw only the sacramental form.
Waltneof was second son of Simon, Earl of Huntingdon, and Matilda or Maud, daughter to Judith, the niece of William the Conqueror.  His elder brother was called Simon, and in their childhood it was the pastime of this Simon to build castles and play at soldiers, but Waltheof's to build churches and monasteries of stones and wood.
  When grown up, the elder inherited his father's martial disposition together with his title; but Waltheof had a strong inclination for the religious life and was mild and peace-loving. Their mother Maud, after the death of her first husband, was given in marriage by King Henry I to St David I, King of Scotland, and Waltheof followed his mother to that court, where he formed an intimate friendship with St Ached, who was master of the royal household at that time.  When he went out hunting with the king Waltheof used to hide himself in. some thicket and there employ the day in meditation or reading.  The king, having one day surprised him at this, told the queen that her son was not a man of this world, for he could find no satisfaction in its diversions.  Only once did it look as if his vocation might be lost; he had attracted the attention of one of the ladies of the court and accepted from her a ring, which he wore on his linger. Such gages commonly have more serious developments, but when a courtier, noticing the ring, said, "Ha! At last Waltheof begins to take some notice of women he pulled himself together, snatched off the ring, and threw it into the fire.

  Soon after he decided to avoid the life of a court cleric and become a religious. He left Scotland, and made his profession among regular canons of St Augustine in their monastery at Nostell, near Pontefract in Yorkshire.   He was soon after chosen prior of Kirkham, in the same county, and, realizing the obligations he now lay under for the sanctification of others as well as for his own, he redoubled his austerity and regularity of observance.   In celebrating Mass one Christmas day, after the consecration of the bread he was favoured with a wonderful vision.  The divine Word, who on that day had made Himself visible to mankind by His birth, seemed pleased to manifest Himself not only to the eyes of faith but also to the bodily eyes of His servant.  Waltheof saw in his hands, not the form of bread, but the radiant form of the child Jesus.   When he had laid the Host on the altar he saw only the sacramental form.
  Waitheof, impressed by the life and vigour of the Cistercian monks, became anxious to join them; naturally he was encouraged by the advice of his friend St Aelred, then abbot of Rievaulx, and accordingly he took the habit at Wardon in Bedfordshire.  Waltheof found Cistercian life excessively severe, and judged it to be therefore less suitable for the salvation of souls than Augustinian discretion.  Nevertheless, only four years after profession, he was chosen abbot of Melrose, recently founded on banks of the Tweed by King David.  Whenever he fell into the smallest falling by inadvertence Waltheof immediately had recourse to confession, a practice of perfection which the confessors found rather trying, as one of them admitted to Jordan, the saint's biographer. Yet cheerfulness and spiritual joy always shone in his face, and his words were animated with a lire which penetrated the hearts of those that heard him.   His alms supported the poor of all the country round his abbey, and he is said to have twice multiplied bread miraculously. He once went to King Stephen in England, about affairs of his community, carrying a bundle on his back.   His brother Simon, who was present, was very annoyed and said to the king, "See how this brother of mine, and cousin of yours, disgraces his family."  " Not so," said the king.  "If we understand what the grace of God is, he does honour to us and all his kindred."  In 1154 Waltheof was chosen archbishop of Saint Andrews; but he prevailed on St Aelred to oppose the election and not to oblige him to accept it.   Once when giving a conference to his community he had occasion to refer to a vision of the glory of Heaven which had been vouchsafed to him, but he spoke in the third person as of another; but at last by inadvertence he spoke in the first person: he no sooner realized it than, cutting his discourse short, he withdrew in tears, much afflicted for the word which had escaped him.   St Waltheof died at a great age on August 3, about 1160.

  Under the Latin form "Walthenus", a long life, attributed to Joscelia, or Jordan, a monk of Furness (c. mc), is printed in the Acta Sanctonan, August, vol. i.  Though prolix, the narrative may be considered fairly reliable.  See also T. 1). Hardy, Descriptive Catalogue of MSS. (Rolls Series), vol. ii, p. 285.
1105 St. Peter of Anagni 1st crusader Benedictine bishop papal legate
Anágniæ sancti Petri Epíscopi, qui, monástica primum observántia, deínde pastoráli vigilántia clarus, quiévit in Dómino.
    At Anagni, St. Peter, who rested in the Lord after gaining great renown for monastical observance and for pastoral vigilance.
   A native of Salerno, Italy, he entered the Benedictines and so distinguished himself as a monk that Pope St. Gregory VII appointed him bishop of Anagni. As bishop, he improved the spiritual welfare of the city, built a new cathedral, and promoted the First Crusade to the Holy Land, a venture in which he participated. Pope Urban II sent him to Constantinople as papal legate to the Byzantine Empire. He was canonized in 1109 by Pope Paschal II, a mere four years after his death. 
   Peter of Anagni, OSB B (RM) Born at Salerno, Italy; died 1105; canonized in 1109. Saint Peter became a Benedictine in Salerno, and was appointed bishop of Anagni by Pope Saint Gregory VII in 1062. There he built a new cathedral. He participated in the first crusade and was sent as papal legate to Constantinople (Benedictines, Encyclopedia)
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1147 St Anthony the Roman Born to rich parents adhered to Orthodox Faith; raised him in piety; study of the Fathers in the Greek language; distributed part inheritance to poor, other portion he put into a wooden barrel and threw it into the sea; Persecution of the Latins against the Orthodox forced the brethren to separate; a terrible storm tore away the stone on which St Anthony stood, and threw it into the sea; divine Providence floated the stone to Novgorod {the Novgorod Chronicles}; fishermen recovered barrel was returned used money to buy land for monastery
   Born at Rome 1067 to rich parents who adhered to the Orthodox Faith, raised in piety. After losing his parents at age 17, he took up the study of the Fathers in the Greek language. Afterwards, he distributed part of his inheritance to the poor, and the other portion he put into a wooden barrel and threw it into the sea;
Then he was tonsured at one of the wilderness monasteries, where he lived for 20 years.
    Persecution of Latins against the Orthodox forced the brethren to separate. St Anthony wandered from place to place until he came upon a large rock upon the shore of the sea, where he lived for a whole year in fasting and prayer. On September 5, 1105 a terrible storm tore away the stone on which St Anthony stood, and threw it into the sea. By divine Providence, the stone floated to Novgorod. On the Feast of the Nativity of the Most Holy Theotokos, the stone halted 3 versts from Novgorod on the banks of the River Volkhov near the village of Volkhov This event is testified to in the Novgorod Chronicles.
At this place the monk, with the blessing of St Nikita the Hermit (May 14), founded a monastery in honor of the Nativity of the Most Holy Theotokos

In another year, fishermen recovered the barrel containing St Anthony's inheritance, cast into the sea many years before. The saint recognized his barrel, but the fishermen did not want to give it to him. Before a judge, St Anthony described the contents of the barrel, and it was returned to him. The saint used the money to buy land for the monastery. Spiritual asceticism was combined at the monastery with intense physical labor.
St Anthony was concerned that help should be given to the needy, orphans and widows from monastery funds.

In 1117, the saint built a stone church in honor of the Nativity of the Most Holy Theotokos. The church, built during the lifetime of St Anthony in the years 1117-1119 by the renowned Novgorod architect Peter, and adorned with frescoes in the year 1125, has been preserved to the present time. In 1131, St Niphon of Novgorod made St Anthony igumen of the monastery. He died on August 3, 1147 and was buried by St Niphon.
St Anthony was glorified in 1597. His memory is also celebrated (uncovering of his relics) on the first Friday after the Feast of the Foremost Apostles Peter and Paul (June 29), and on January 17, on the same day that St Anthony the Great is commemorated. The first Life of St Anthony the Roman was written soon after his death by his disciple and successor as igumen, the hieromonk Andrew. A Life, with an account of the uncovering of the relics, was written by a novice of the Antoniev monastery, the monk Niphon, in the year 1598.
1160 Bl. Waltheof Cistercian abbot undaunted cheerfulness humility, simplicity, and kindness unbounded generosity incorrupt Many miracles recorded during lifetime Eucharistic visions of Christ in the form appropriate to feasts of Christmas, Passiontide, Easter, visions of heaven and hell.
also known as Walthen and Waldef. The son of Simon, earl of lluntingdon, England, he was born circa 1100, and was raised at the court ofthe Scottish king alter his mother, Maud, wed King David I of Scotland (r. 1124-1153) following the death ofher first husband. While at court, Waltheof came under the influence of St. Adred, who was master of the royal household. Drawn toward the religious life, he entered the Augustinian Canons in Yorkshire and was elected abbot of Kirkham after a vision of the Christ Child.
Waltheofdesired a more austere life and so joined the Cistercians at Wardon, Bedfordshire, and then became abbot ofMelrose which had been rebuilt recently by his stepfather. In later years, he declined the office of archbishop of St. Andrews. He was renowned for his immense charity to the poor, personal holiness, and deep austerity.

Waltheof of Melrose, OSB Cist. Abbot (AC) (also known as Waldef, Walden, Wallevus, Walène, Walthen)
Died August 3, c. 1160. Waltheof was the grandson of the Northumbrian patriot Saint Waldef, and the second son of Earl Simon of Huntingdon and Matilda (Maud), daughter of Judith, the niece of William the Conqueror. During their childhood, his elder brother Simon loved to build castles and play at soldiers, but Waltheof's passion was to build churches and monasteries of wood and stones. When grown up, Simon inherited his father's martial disposition as well as his title; but Waltheof had a strong inclination toward the religious life, and was mild and peace-loving.
When their father died, King Henry I gave their mother in marriage to King Saint David of Scotland. Waltheof followed his mother to the Scottish court, where he became an intimate friend of Saint Aelred, who was master of the royal household at that time.
Soon Waltheof decided to enter religious life. He left Scotland, and, about 1130, professed himself an Augustinian canon regular at Nostell, near Pontefract in Yorkshire. He was soon chosen prior of the recently founded Kirkham (1134) in the same country, and, realizing the obligations he now had to work for the sanctification of others as well as himself, he redoubled his austerity and regularity of observance.
In 1140, Waltheof was chosen by the canons of York to succeed Thurstan as archbishop, but King Stephen quashed the election because of Waltheof's known Scottish sympathies.
Waltheof, impressed by the life and vigor of the Cistercian monks, became anxious to join them. At first he tried to unite his community en bloc with that of Rievaulx, but met with opposition. Naturally he was encouraged by the advice of his friend Aelred, then abbot of Rievaulx, and accordingly he took the habit at Wardon (Waldron) in Bedfordshire.
Perhaps because one of his own traits was undaunted cheerfulness, Waltheof found Cistercian life excessively severe. The canons also put obstacles in his way. But he persevered as a Cistercian and moved to Rievaulx, where Aelred had been elected abbot in 1148. Only four years after profession, Waltheof was chosen abbot of Melrose in 1149, recently founded on the banks of the Tweed by King David.
He had succeeded a man of ungovernable temper, so his sweetness must have been a shock for his brothers. He won their love and respect through humility, simplicity, and kindness. Like Saint Mayeul of Cluny, he preferred to be damned for excessive mercy rather than for excessive justice. With the help of King David, he also founded monasteries at Cultram and Kinross.
Whenever he fell into the smallest failing by inadvertence, Waltheof immediately made his confession, a practice of perfection which the confessors found rather trying, as one of them admitted to Jordan, the saint's biographer. In 1154 (or 1159), Waltheof was chosen archbishop of Saint Andrew's; but he prevailed upon Aelred to oppose the election and not to oblige him to accept it.
Upon his death, this saint of unbounded generosity to the poor was buried in the chapter house at Melrose. In 1207, his body was found to be incorrupt and was translated. When it was again translated in 1240, it was corrupted. Waltheof was never formally canonized but a popular cultus continued until the time of the Reformation.
Many miracles were recorded of Saint Waltheof during his lifetime. He had Eucharistic visions of Christ in the form appropriate to the feasts of Christmas, Passiontide, and Easter, and visions of heaven and hell. He multiplied food and had the gift of healing (Benedictines, Farmer, Walsh).
In art, Saint Waltheof is portrayed as a Cistercian kneeling by a block of stone at sunrise. Sometimes he may be shown restoring sight to a blind man (Roeder).

1295 “ST” THOMAS OF DOVER Miracles were recorded at his tomb and Simon Simeon, an Irish friar who made a pilgrimage to the Holy Land about 1322, mentions the honour given to him as a martyr “at the Black Monks, under Dover Castle”. King Richard II asked Pope Urban VI to canonize Thomas, and a process was begun in 1382 but never carried out

AMONG English holy men of the middle ages who have quite dropped out of memory is Thomas of Hales, a monk of the Benedictine priory of St Martin at Dover, a cell of Christ Church, Canterbury. On August 2, 1295, a French raid descended on Dover from the sea, and the monks of the priory fled with the exception of this venerable old man, who in accordance with the Rule went to take his mid-day siesta. When the raiders invaded the monastery they found him on his bed and told him to disclose where the church plate and other valuables had been hidden; he refused, and was at once put to death.

Miracles were recorded at his tomb and Simon Simeon, an Irish friar who made a pilgrimage to the Holy Land about 1322, mentions the honour given to him as a martyr “at the Black Monks, under Dover Castle”. King Richard II asked Pope Urban VI to canonize Thomas, and a process was begun in 1382 but never carried out. There was considerable popular cultus of Thomas locally, and he was represented among the paintings of martyrs in the English College of Rome; but to call him Saint is an almost entirely modern practice.

There is a life and passio (BHL. 8248 b), and a summary of it and of some miracles (BHL. 8249); texts in C. Horstman, Nova Legenda Anglie (1901), vol. ii, pp. 555—558 and 403; translations in C. R. Haines, Dover Priory (1930), on which book see the following article, p. 168, n. 4 and p. 191, n. 2. In Analecta Bollandiana, vol. lxxii (1954), pp. 167—191, Fr P. Grosjean provides a fully documented discussion of all that is known of Thomas de la Hale.

1323 Blessed Augustine Gazotich of Lucera fought the Manichæen heresy; in Sicily, Islam; in Hungary both Several charming miracles are related OP B (AC) Born in Trau, Dalmatia, c. 1260-1262; cultus reconfirmed by Pope Clement XI in 1702.
Augustine was born into a wealthy family who provided him with an excellent education. At 18, he and an Italian friend headed to the Dominican novitiate in France. Near Pavia, Italy, they were attacked by enemies of his family, who left the bodies of the two boys in the snow by the side of the road. Augustine was badly injured; his friend died. When he recovered from his injuries, Augustine continued to the novitiate. Augustine spent most of his life battling heresy: In his native Dalmatia, he fought the Manichæen heresy; in Sicily, Islam; in Hungary both.

In every situation in which he found himself, Augustine gave proof of his virtue and good judgment. When Cardinal Boccasini came to Hungary as legate, he noted the wisdom and tact of his brother Dominican, and when he himself ascended the papal throne as Benedict XI, he appointed Augustine bishop of Zagreb in Croatia in 1303.
This diocese was in chaos when Augustine assumed the cathedra. His three predecessors had all tried, but failed, to repair the ravages of heresy, plague, and schism. The new bishop began by reforming the clergy. He finished building the cathedral and made a complete visitation of his diocese. His work was to bring him into violent conflict with the government, but, spiritually, he restored the entire see during his episcopacy.

Several charming miracles are related about Augustine. The river water of Zagreb was unfit to drink, so the Dominican fathers asked Augustine to pray for a new supply. At his prayer a fountain sprang up in the yard of the convent, abundantly supplying their needs. Another time he planted a tree in a little village and the leaves turned out to have healing properties. On one occasion, when Bishop Augustine was dining with Benedict XI, the pope, feeling that a missionary bishop must eat well to preach well, had a dish of partridge set before Augustine, who never ate meat. Because he did not want to offend the pope, he prayed for a resolution to the situation. The legend says that God turned the partridges into fish!

Augustine was transferred from Zagreb to Lucera (Nocera), Sicily. Here he continued his holy government, using his characteristic gentleness and his gift of healing. He promoted devotion to Saints Dominic, Thomas Aquinas, and Peter Martyr--all brother Dominicans. Feeling that he was near death, he returned to the Dominican convent in Nocera to die among his brethren. Under his statue in the cathedral of Nocera is the legend, "Sanctus Augustine Episcopus Lucerinus Ordinis Praedicatorum," an indication of the veneration in which he is held (Benedictines, Dorcy)
.
1625 Marabda 9,000 Martyrs; On the Feast of the Annunciation the Georgians annihilated the army of the Persian shah Abbas I in the Battle of Martqopi. The victory unified Georgia’s eastern provinces of Kartli and Kakheti. It also instilled hope in other enslaved peoples of the Transcaucasus, and rebellions began to break out everywhere; But another battle that had begun at dawn finally ended late that night with the defeat of the Georgian army. Nine thousand Georgians gave their lives for Christ and their motherland on the battlefield at Marabda
Apud Indos, Persis finítimos, pássio sanctórum Monachórum, et aliórum fidélium, quos Abénner Rex, pérsequens Ecclésiam Dei, divérsis afflíctos supplíciis, cædi jussit.
    Among the Indians, bordering on Persia, the martyrdom of holy monks and other Christians who were put to death after suffering diverse torments, during the persecution of the Church of God by King Abenner.
   Soon the enraged Shah Abbas marched his finest and largest army toward Georgia under the leadership of Isa-Khan Qurchibash. A Georgian army of some twenty thousand men encamped near Kojori-Tabakhmela in preparation for the attack, while the enemy’s army, which numbered in excess of fifty thousand men, encamped at Marabda. According to tradition, the Georgian soldiers received Holy Communion at dawn before the battle.
Bishop Domenti (Avalishvili) of Ruisi prepared to serve the Holy Gifts to the soldiers but they cried out with a single voice: “If you will join us and take up your sword and fight, then do so. We can receive Holy Communion from another!”
Inspired by these words, the bishop joined in, proclaiming, “Today we will fight a battle for faith and for Christ; therefore my blood must be spilled before yours!” With his vestments as armor, the bishop blessed the soldiers and took place front line.
The banner of the Georgian army was entrusted to the nine Kherkheulidze brothers.
    The Persians panicked upon coming face-to-face with the courage and fortitude of the Georgian soldiers, but the experienced commander Isa-Khan Qurchibash would not yield in battle. Help arrived from Beglerbeg Shaybani-Khan, and with the extra forces the Persians soon gained the advantage over the Georgian army. The Georgian colonel Teimuraz Mukhranbatoni was fatally wounded, and rumors of his death threw the soldiers into a frenzy, since they erroneously believed that the dead man was King Teimuraz I of Kakheti, the commander of their army.
   Believing that their leader had fallen, the Georgian soldiers became anxious and their army was enfeebled. Before long they recognized their mistake, but it was too late—the fate of the battle had already been decided.
   The military leaders Davit Jandieri, Aghatang Kherkheulidze and Baadur Tsitsishvili and the bishops of Rustavi and Kharchasho all fell in the battle at Marabda. The nine banner-bearing Kherkheulidze brothers were also killed. When the banner that had led their army through the battles at Didgori and Basiani fell from the hands of the youngest brother, their sister grabbed hold of it immediately, and when she also fell, the banner and symbol of Georgian invincibility was raised up again by their mother.
   King Teimuraz fought until sunset, when every sword he had held in his hands had been broken. Even his rings were broken in the combat. The uniform of the brilliant military leader Giorgi Saakadze was stained with blood from top to bottom. Atabeg Manuchar of Samtskhe and his sons also fought bravely in this battle.
   Utterly exhausted and debilitated by the heat, the Georgians fought heroically to the last moment. But the battle that had begun at dawn finally ended late that night with the defeat of the Georgian army. Nine thousand Georgians gave their lives for Christ and their motherland on the battlefield at Marabda.

1868 ST PETER JULIAN EYMARD, FOUNDER OF THE PRIESTS OF THE BLESSED SACRAMENT

August 3, 2009 St. Peter Julian Eymard (1811-1868) 
Born in La Mure d'Isère in southeastern France, Peter Julian's faith journey drew him from being a priest in the Diocese of Grenoble (1834) to joining the Marists (1839) to founding the Congregation of the Blessed Sacrament (1856).

In addition to those changes, Peter Julian coped with poverty, his father's initial opposition to Peter's vocation, serious illness, a Jansenistic striving for inner perfection and the difficulties of getting diocesan and later papal approval for his new religious community.

His years as a Marist, including service as a provincial leader, saw the deepening of his eucharistic devotion, especially through his preaching of Forty Hours in many parishes.

Inspired at first by the idea of reparation for indifference to the Eucharist, Peter Julian was eventually attracted to a more positive spirituality of Christ-centered love. Members of the men's community, which Peter founded, alternated between an active apostolic life and contemplating Jesus in the Eucharist. He and Marguerite Guillot founded the women's Congregation of the Servants of the Blessed Sacrament.
Peter Julian Eymard was beatified in 1925 and canonized in 1962, one day after Vatican II's first session ended.

Comment:  In every century, sin has been painfully real in the life of the Church. It is easy to give in to despair, to speak so strongly of human failings that people may forget the immense and self-sacrificing love of Jesus, as his death on the cross and his gift of the Eucharist make evident. Peter Julian knew that the Eucharist was key to helping Catholics live out their Baptism and preach by word and example the Good News of Jesus Christ.
Quote: “The Eucharist is the life of the people. The Eucharist gives them a center of life. All can come together without the barriers of race or language in order to celebrate the feast days of the Church. It gives them a law of life, that of charity, of which it is the source; thus it forges between them a common bond, a Christian kinship” (Peter Julian Eymard).

ST PETER JULIAN was born in 1811 at La Mure d’Isère, a small town in the diocese of Grenoble. His father was a cutler, and Peter Julian worked at his father’s trade, and in an oil-press, until he was eighteen; in his spare hours he studied Latin and had some instruction from a priest at Grenoble for whom he worked for a time, and in 1831 he went to the seminary of Grenoble. He was ordained there in 1834 and for the five following years ministered in the parishes of Chatte and Monteynard. What they thought of him there was expressed in the words of his bishop, Mgr de Bruillard, when the Abbé Eymard asked for permission to join the Marists: “I show my esteem for that congregation by allowing such a priest as yourself to enter it.”

After his novitiate he was made spiritual director of the junior seminary at Belley, and in 1845 provincial of his congregation at Lyons. Always the Blessed Sacrament had been the centre round which his life revolved, “without It I should have been lost”, and on a certain Corpus Christi Sunday, while carrying the Host in procession, he had an overwhelming experience: “My soul was flooded with faith and love for Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament. Those two hours seemed but a moment. I laid at the feet of our Lord the Church in France and throughout the world, everybody, myself. My eyes were filled with tears: it was as though my heart were under the wine-press. I longed at that moment for all hearts to have been within my own and to have been fired with the zeal of St Paul.”

In 1851 Father Eymard made a pilgrimage to Notre-Dame de Fourvières:  One idea haunted me, and it was this: that Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament had no religious institute to glorify His mystery of love, whose only object was entire consecration to Its service. There ought to be one. . . . I promised Mary to devote myself to this end. It was still all very vague, and I had no idea of leaving the society. . . . ‘What hours I spent there!” His superiors advised him to defer his plans till they were more mature, and he spent four years at La Seyne. During this time he received encouragement from Pope Pius IX and from the Ven. John Cohn, founder of the Marists, and he determined to sacrifice his vocation with the Society of Mary and to devote himself to a new society. In 1856, with the approval of the Marist superior general, he submitted his scheme for an institute of priest­-adorers of the Blessed Sacrament to Mgr de Sibour, Archbishop of Paris, and at the end of twelve anxious days it was approved. Mgr de Sibour put a house at his disposal, wherein Father Eymard took up his residence with one companion, and on January 6, 1857, the Blessed Sacrament was exposed in its chapel for the first time, and Father Eymard preached to a large assembly.

The first members of the Congregation of Priests of the Most Blessed Sacrament were Father de Cuers and Father Champion, and they began with exposition three times a week. Vocations were slow: many were called but few chosen; and the difficulties were great. They had to leave their first house, and in 1858 they obtained a small chapel in the Faubourg Saint-Jacques, where during nine years the grace of God was poured out so abundantly that Father Eymard called it the “chapel of miracles”. In the following year Pope Pius IX gave the congregation a laudatory brief and a second house was opened, at Marseilles, and in 1862 a third, at Angers. By this time there were enough members to establish a regular novitiate, and the congregation rapidly expanded. The priests recite the Divine Office in choir and perform all other duties of the clergy, subordinate to their chief business of maintaining perpetual adoration of the Blessed Sacrament exposed, in which they are assisted by lay-brothers. In 1858 Father Eymard established the Servants of the Blessed Sacrament, sisters who are also engaged in perpetual adoration and spreading the love of our Lord; and he founded the Priests’ Euchar­istic League, whose members pledge themselves to spend so far as possible about an hour a day in prayer before the Tabernacle.

But Father Eymard did not confine his labours to the clergy and religious: in his Work for Poor Adults he put before his congregation the necessity for preparing for first communion all adults who are no longer of an age to attend the parish catechism classes, or who are unable to go to these classes, and he also organized the Archconfraternity of the Blessed Sacrament, whose value is so highly regarded by the Church that by canon law a branch should be erected in every parish; he also wrote a number of books on the Eucharist which have been translated into several languages.

Of the difficulties which beset St Peter Julian in making his new foundation one of the most trying was the adverse criticism he was subjected to at its very inception, because he had left the Society of Mary, and detractors of the work were not wanting when it was started. He excused them: “They do not under­stand it, and each one who thinks to oppose it does it a service. For I know well it must be persecuted. Was not our Lord persecuted throughout His life?” There were other grave difficulties and disappointments, but in spite of all the congregation was approved by the Holy See, as has been said, in his lifetime, and was finally confirmed in perpetuum in 1895. He had an engaging spirit of pietas: whenever he visited his home at La Mure he regularly made three “stations”: at the font at which he was baptized, at the altar where he received his first communion, and at the tomb of his parents; and again, in 1867, “For how long have I waited to see again the dear country of Chatte and Saint-Romans”, scenes of his earliest ministry. Father Eymard had been looked on as a saint even in those days, and throughout his life the impression of his holiness was recognized more and more, in his daily life and virtues, in his works, and in his supernatural gifts: several times he knew the thoughts of persons absent, he read souls, and more than once had prophetic prevision. St John-Baptist Vianney, who knew Eymard personally, said of him, “He is a saint. The world hinders his work, but not knowingly, and it will do great things for the glory of God. Adoration by priests! How fine!

Tell the good Father Eymard I will pray for the work every day.”

During the last four years of his life St Peter Julian suffered from rheumatic gout and insomnia, and his sufferings were added to by saddening difficulties. For once he allowed his discouragement to be seen. “He opened his heart to us”, wrote Father Mayet in 1868." ‘ This time’, he said, ‘ I am crushed under the cross, beaten down, annihilated.’ His heart felt the need of seeking relief from a friend, because, as he explained, ‘ I am obliged to bear my cross alone, so as not to frighten or discourage my confreres'.” The presentiment of approaching death was strong. “ I shall return sooner than you think”, was his reply when his sister urged him to visit La Mure more often. This was in February, and he began to go round visiting his penitents and others who looked to him, speaking to them as one who spoke for the last time. In July he broke down and his doctor ordered him to leave Paris at once. On the 21st he left Grenoble by coach for La Mure; it was very hot and he arrived in a state of collapse and partial paralysis. On August 1 he died. Miracles took place at his tomb before the end of that years and in 1925 Peter Julian Eymard was beatified, and canonized in 1962 during the Second Vatican Council.

There is a short sketch by Lady Herbert, The Priest of the Eucharist (1898); an excellent life by J. M. Lambert in the series “Les Saints” (1925); a full biography in French by F. Trochu (1949), and one in Italian by P. Fossati (1925). See also A. Bettinger, Pierre­Julien Eymard et sa méthode d’Adoration (1927).



ewtnmissionaries.com
Our Lady of the Angels of Portiuncula (Solemnity)

It Makes No Sense Not To Believe In GOD
Every Christian must be a living book wherein one can read the teaching of the gospel

September is the month of Our Lady of Sorrows since 1857;

Pope Francis  PRAYER INTENTIONS FOR  August 2016
Universal:   That sports may be an opportunity for friendly encounters between peoples and may contribute to peace in the world.
Evangelization:  That Christians may live the Gospel, giving witness to faith, honesty, and love of neighbor.
          
 50 St. Lydia Purpuraria Paul's first convert at Philippi
1st v. St. Abibas A convert to the faith 2nd son of Gamaliel famed Jewish teacher of St. Paul
45 St. Gamaliel Pharisee mentor of St. Paul great teachers of the Mosaic law 1st century counselled the Sanhedrin not to confute God's will by killing Peter and Apostles arrested for preaching Jesus
1st v. Nicodemus Sanhedrin spoke out on Jesus' behalf before the chief priests and the Pharisees "We know that you are a teacher come from God, for no one can do these signs that you do unless God is with him." Saint John even says that it was to Nicodemus that our Lord said, "God so loved the world that He gave His only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life."M (RM)
45 St. Gamaliel Pharisee mentor of St. Paul great teachers of the Mosaic law 1st century counselled the Sanhedrin not to confute God's will by killing Peter and Apostles arrested for preaching Jesus
1st v. Nicodemus Sanhedrin spoke out on Jesus' behalf before the chief priests and the Pharisees
       St. Aspren Bishop cured and baptized by St. Peter
 304 ST Theodota, MARTYR
  415 The Finding Of St Stephe
  446 St. Dalmatius  Anti Nestorian An archimandrite a great ascetic and particularly excelled at fasting;  
484 Saint Razhden, a convert in Georgia, the Protomartyr descended from a noble Persian family

6th v. St Cosmas the Hermit; lived in Palestine Pharan wilderness strict fasting, firm defender of Orthodox Faith and dogmas, profoundly knowledgeable Holy Scripture works of the Church Fathers;
933 Blessed Gregory of Nonantula, Benedictine abbot the great Italian abbey of Nonantula near Modena
940 Benno of Metz; Strasbourg priest, hermit on Mount Etzel Switzerland where Saint Meinrad had lived; restored Mary shrine attracted disciples; German King named Benno bishop of Metz; blinded by enemies of his reforms; resigned see returned to Mount Etzel joined by Eberhard Strasbourg cathedral provost; hermitage developed into Einsiedeln Abbey monastery; long venerated a beatus
1105 St. Peter of Anagni 1st crusader Benedictine bishop papal legate
1160 St Waltneof, Abbot of Melrose; saw not the form of bread, but radiant form of the child Jesus.
1323 Blessed Augustine Gazotich of Lucera fought Manichæen heresy Sicily, Islam; in Hungary; miracles
1868 ST PETER JULIAN EYMARD, FOUNDER of the priests of the Blessed Sacrement

                                                           
       
40 Days for Life  11,000+ saved lives in 2015
We are the defenders of true freedom.
  May our witness unveil the deception of the "pro-choice" slogan.
40 days for Life Campaign saves lives Shawn Carney Campaign Director www.40daysforlife.com
Please help save the unborn they are the future for the world

It is a great poverty that a child must die so that you may live as you wish -- Mother Teresa
 Saving babies, healing moms and dads, 'The Gospel of Life'

"Man Needs Eternity -- and Every Other Hope, for Him, Is All Too Brief"
It Makes No Sense Not To Believe In GOD 
Every Christian must be a living book wherein one can read the teaching of the gospel

Jesus brings us many Blessings
Cheerfulness strengthens the heart and makes us persevere in a good life.
Therefore the servant of God ought always to be in good spirits. -- St. Philip Neri


"Time is not our own and we must give a strict accounting of it."
1606 St. Toribio Alfonso de Mogrovejo Bishop defender of the native Indians in Peru's rights

SCRIPTURE
My power is made perfect in weakness. -- 2 Corinthians 12:9
Holy Week: A Liturgical Explanation for the Days of Holy Week

Wednesday, August 3, 2016

Jeremiah 31:1-7 ;1"At that time, says the LORD, I will be the God of all the families of Israel, and they shall be my people." 2Thus says the LORD: "The people who survived the sword found grace in the wilderness; when Israel sought for rest, 3the LORD appeared to him from afar. I have loved you with an everlasting love; therefore I have continued my faithfulness to you. 4Again I will build you, and you shall be built, O virgin Israel! Again you shall adorn yourself with timbrels, and shall go forth in the dance of the merrymakers. 5Again you shall plant vineyards upon the mountains of Sama'ria; the planters shall plant, and shall enjoy the fruit. 6For there shall be a day when watchmen will call in the hill country of E'phraim: `Arise, and let us go up to Zion, to the LORD our God.'" 7For thus says the LORD: "Sing aloud with gladness for Jacob, and raise shouts for the chief of the nations; proclaim, give praise, and say, `The LORD has saved his people, the remnant of Israel.' 
 
Jeremiah 31:10-13 ; 10"Hear the word of the LORD, O nations, and declare it in the coastlands afar off; say, `He who scattered Israel will gather him, and will keep him as a shepherd keeps his flock.' 11For the LORD has ransomed Jacob, and has redeemed him from hands too strong for him. 12They shall come and sing aloud on the height of Zion, and they shall be radiant over the goodness of the LORD, over the grain, the wine, and the oil, and over the young of the flock and the herd; their life shall be like a watered garden, and they shall languish no more. 13Then shall the maidens rejoice in the dance, and the young men and the old shall be merry. I will turn their mourning into joy, I will comfort them, and give them gladness for sorrow.

Matthew 15:21-28 ;  21And Jesus went away from there and withdrew to the district of Tyre and Sidon. 22And behold, a Canaanite woman from that region came out and cried, "Have mercy on me, O Lord, Son of David; my daughter is severely possessed by a demon." 23But he did not answer her a word. And his disciples came and begged him, saying, "Send her away, for she is crying after us." 24He answered, "I was sent only to the lost sheep of the house of Israel." 25But she came and knelt before him, saying, "Lord, help me." 26And he answered, "It is not fair to take the children's bread and throw it to the dogs." 27She said, "Yes, Lord, yet even the dogs eat the crumbs that fall from their masters' table." 28Then Jesus answered her, "O woman, great is your faith! Be it done for you as you desire." And her daughter was healed instantly. 
   Blessed are they who have kept the word with a generous heart
and yield a harvest through perseverance.


Please pray for those who have no one to pray for them.

Now there is a great difference between believing in Christ, and in believing that Jesus is the Christ.
For that he was the Christ even the devils believed;
but he believes in Christ who both loves Christ, and hopes in Christ.  -- St. Augustine


8 Martyrs Move Closer to Sainthood 8 July, 2016

Pope Francis  PRAYER INTENTIONS FOR  August 2016
Universal:   That sports may be an opportunity for friendly encounters between peoples and may contribute to peace in the world.
Evangelization:  That Christians may live the Gospel, giving witness to faith, honesty, and love of neighbor.

The Virgin Mary of Nazareth
The First Moment of Christian Tradition Began in Mary's Heart (III)
Today her intercession has proved to be amazingly powerful...
 
When faith is strong it works wonders ( Mk 16:17 ).
 
Mary's heart is not a document, it's a source. "She stored up all these things in her heart"
(Lk 2:19 & 51), and that was the Word of God.
Excerpt from "Follow the Lamb" (Suivre l'Agneau)  Father Marie-Dominique Philippe Saint Paul Ed. 2005


THE HOLY NAME OF JESUS
 50 St. Lydia Purpuraria Paul's first convert at Philippi
1st v. St. Abibas A convert to the faith 2nd son of Gamaliel famed Jewish teacher of St. Paul
45 St. Gamaliel Pharisee mentor of St. Paul great teachers of the Mosaic law 1st century counselled the Sanhedrin not to confute God's will by killing Peter and Apostles arrested for preaching Jesus
1st v. Nicodemus Sanhedrin spoke out on Jesus' behalf before the chief priests and the Pharisees "We know that you are a teacher come from God, for no one can do these signs that you do unless God is with him." Saint John even says that it was to Nicodemus that our Lord said, "God so loved the world that He gave His only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life."M (RM)
       St. Aspren Bishop cured and baptized by St. Peter
 304 ST Theodota, MARTYR
  415 The Finding Of St Stephe
  446 St. Dalmatius { Dalmatus )Anti Nestorian An archimandrite a great ascetic and particularly excelled at fasting; a zealous proponent of the Orthodox Faith at the Third Ecumenical Council at Ephesus (431), which condemned the heresy of Nestorius venerated in Constantinople; a staunch defender of the Church against the heretical Nestorians.
5th v. Trea of Ardtree conversion to Christianity by Saint Patrick recluse at ArdtreeV (AC)
  448 St Germanus, Bishop Of Auxerre; by his teaching and miracles Pelagianism was finally eradicated and its teachers banished, free from heresy the Church in these islands remained for a space of eleven hundred years, until the errors of Protestantism took root and were watered by royal corruption in the sixteenth century;  feast observed in Wales and in several southern English dioceses; he was strengthening and consolidating the British church after abandoned by the Roman empire, of purging it from error, of converting yet more of the people; and by his influence on St Patrick; no doubt Germanus left his mark on Ireland also
  450 St. Faustus A monk of considerable fame, reportedly the son of St. Dalmatius.
475 Euphronius of Autun extant letter (Patrologia Latina col. 66-67) from Bishop Saint Euphronius of Autun to Saint Lupus of Troyes B (RM)

 484 Saint Razhden, a convert in Georgia, the Protomartyr descended from a noble Persian family
5th v. Marana and Cyra two maidens who became hermits near Beroea, Syria MM (RM)
         
St. Senach Finian 6th century disciple of Saint Finnian and his successor at Clonard
6th v. St Cosmas the Hermit; lived in the Pharan wilderness of Palestine; strict of fasting, firm defender of the Orthodox Faith and Church dogmas, profoundly knowledgeable in Holy Scripture and works of the Church Fathers;
Mancus (Manaccus) is the titular patron of Lanreath church in Cornwall, where, according to William Worcestre, his relics were venerated; image appears in 16th-century Young Women's Window Saint Neot's Church in Cornwall
933 Blessed Gregory of Nonantula, OSB Abbot A Benedictine abbot of the great Italian abbey of Nonantula near Modena (Benedictines).(AC)
  940 Benno of Metz; left noble family became Strasbourg priest, hermit on Mount Etzel Switzerland where Saint Meinrad had lived; restored Mary shrine attracted disciples; German King named Benno bishop of Metz; blinded by enemies of his reforms; resigned see returned to Mount Etzel joined by Eberhard Strasbourg cathedral provost; hermitage developed into Einsiedeln Abbey monastery; long venerated a beatus
1105 St. Peter of Anagni 1st crusader Benedictine bishop papal legate
1147 St Anthony the Roman Born to rich parents adhered to Orthodox Faith; raised him in piety; study of the Fathers in the Greek language; distributed part inheritance to poor, other portion he put into a wooden barrel and threw it
into the sea; Persecution of the Latins against the  Orthodox forced the brethren to separate; a terrible storm tor 
away the stone on which St Anthony stood, and threw it into the sea; divine Providence floated the stone to
Novgorod { the Novgorod Chronicles};  fishermen recovered barrel was returned used money for monastery
1160 Bl. Waltheof Cistercian abbot  undaunted cheerfulness  humility, simplicity, and kindness  unbounded generosity
incorrupt Many miracles recorded during lifetime Eucharistic visions of Christ in the form appropriate to feast 
of Christmas, Passiontide, Easter, visions of heaven and hell
1160 St Waltneof, Abbot of Melrose; Waltheof saw in his hands, not the form of bread, but the radiant form of the child Jesus. When he had laid the Host on the altar he saw only the sacramental form.
1295 “ST” THOMAS OF DOVER Miracles were recorded at his tomb and Simon Simeon, an Irish friar who made a pilgrimage to the Holy Land about 1322, mentions the honour given to him as a martyr “at the Black Monks, under Dover Castle”. King Richard II asked Pope Urban VI to canonize Thomas, and a process was begun in 1382 but never carried out
1323 Blessed Augustine Gazotich of Lucera fought the Manichæen heresy; in Sicily, Islam; in Hungary charming miracles are related OP B (AC)
1625 Marabda 9,000 Martyrs; On the Feast of the Annunciation the Georgians annihilated army of the Persian shah Abbas I Battle of Martqopi. The victory unified Georgia’s eastern provinces of Kartli and Kakheti. It instilled hope in other Transcaucasus enslaved peoples, rebellions began to break out everywhere; another battle had begun at dawn finally ended late night with the defeat of the Georgian army. 9,000 Georgians died for Christ and their motherland on the battlefield at Marabda
1868 ST PETER JULIAN EYMARD, FOUNDER OF THE PRIESTS OF THE BLESSED SACRAMENT